At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the Virginia Standards of Learning and Curriculum Framework.

Odysseyware Academy is an Approved Multidivision Online Provider for the Virginia Department of Education and has over 65 courses that have been approved.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

English Grade 6 (1109) VA

English Grade 6 (1109) VA

In English Grade 6 (1109) VA, students will delve into texts that span the genres of narrative fiction, poetry, literary nonfiction, and informational texts to build reading, writing and thinking skills. Students will also develop their writing skills as they focus on producing narrative, persuasive, explanatory, and reflective compositions, as well as creative pieces including poetry. The course concludes with students completing a full research report. With a strong emphasis on close reading instruction, writing and thinking activities, as well as speaking and listening tasks, this course will help students expand their understanding of literature while building 21st century skills. Multimedia and interactive elements are built in to ensure a high-level of student engagement. Students will be enriched as they expand their skills and confidence in language arts through a comprehensive study that includes the following units:

  • Unit 1: Compare characters in both literature and informational text to build on analytical strategies and further develop reading skills
  • Unit 2: Understand the construction of words and their parts, their use in sentences, and the process of editing sentences and paragraphs
  • Unit 3: Justify the power of words and analyze how authors use language to communicate ideas in varied poetry forms and explanatory essays
  • Unit 4: Examine and utilize the components of narrative writing and demonstrate communication skills during group discussions
  • Unit 5: Identify argument and specific claims found in news media, distinguish facts from opinion, as well as identifying bias, propaganda, and fallacies
  • Unit 6: Identify multiple perspectives on various issues by completing a close read of nonfiction texts and integrate information presented in different media and formats to develop a coherent understanding on a complex topic
  • Unit 7:  Use research and inquiry to deepen understanding on selected topics and complete an in-depth research project answering an essential question

State: National
Grade Level: 6
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English Grade 12 (1160) VA

English Grade 12 (1160) VA

In English Grade 12 (1160) VA, students will engage in close-textual interaction with literature to heighten appreciation for those texts, improved critical and analytical skills in reading and writing, enhanced speaking and listening abilities, and enriched students' academic and personal vocabulary. This course is organized chronologically, so students can see the influences on and evolution of the ideas and forms. Writing, research, and speaking assignments will continue to focus on formulating and expressing ideas and arguments about the readings. Emphasis is placed on gaining critical perspective on the relationship between content and form and on synthesizing ideas into clear and concise prose and presentations. To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. 

  • Unit 1: Framing Western Literature: Students will explore selected works of medieval literature and philosophy, closely examining the narrative structure and literary elements such as allegory and satire, noting the way in which these elements reflect social and philosophical views; projects will engage skills such as the participation in academic group discussion and the construction of a literary character study.
  • Unit 2: Humanism: Students will explore selected philosophical and literary works of the Renaissance, comparing the works of this period with those of the Middle Ages, looking at their differences and similarities; projects will engage skills such asargumentation, research, and presentation.
  • Unit 3: The Quest for Knowledge: Students will examine the philosophical and literary writings of the late seventeenth and eighteenth century, focusing their emphasis on reform, reason, and science; special attention will be paid to the literary form known as satire and what it reveals about the author's purpose. Students will also think critically about media and its influence on public opinion. 
  • Unit 5: Head and Heart: Students will explore the literature and philosophy of the early nineteenth century and the emphasis on emotion in early romantic works, such as Jane Austen’sSense and Sensibility; projects will engage skills such as speaking and listening, comparative analysis, and writing and revising an original narrative. Unit 6: The Individual and Society:Students will focus on works and authors concerned with the place of the individual in society during the nineteenth century, including important philosophical works of the period, writing literary analysis essays and constructing and delivering a persuasive speech. 
  • Unit 7: The Search for Meaning: Students will explore works in which authors confront questions about the nature of existence, the meaning of life, the human psyche, and alienation, with the unit culminating in a multimedia research project which presents and evaluates different critical perspectives of a work of the student's choice. To end the course, students will analyze the intent of media and critically analyze multiple media sources.

State: National
Grade Level: 12
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English Grade 11 (1150) VA

English Grade 11 (1150) VA

English Grade 11 (1150) VA is a survey of American Literature and literary culture from its inception through the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on a rhetorical analysis of the literature to determine how authors achieve a particular purpose or effect. Through focused readings, composition, speaking and listening activities, vocabulary study and research, students will continue to build the literacy skills they need to meet the challenges of high school and beyond. To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. That critical content is both rigorous and relevant and includes high-quality contemporary works as well as the classics of literature, in addition to classic myths and stories from around the world, America’s founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare.

  • Unit 1: Intersection in a New World: Students will examine the earliest American literature, which will highlight the intersection, and resulting conflicts, of Native American, European, and African American cultures; students will analyze and understand the use of rhetoric, archaic language, satire, and poetic devices, and will complete projects requiring skills such as academic research and the construction of arguments.
  • Unit 2: Becoming a Nation: Students will focus on the historic and literary significance of documents relating to the establishment of the new government in America, comparing and contrasting tone and point of view in foundational documents, and using what they learn about the qualities of an effective argument to create one of their own.
  • Unit 3: American Romanticism: Students will examine and compare works from American romantic literature, transcendentalism, and the sub-genre of slave narrative; skills that will be addressed will include the analysis of literary elements such as tone, point of view, figurative language, rhetoric, and structure, as well as students will participate in academic discussions; and write analytical and argumentative essays based on literature. 
  • Unit 5: Regional Voices: Students will explore American literature that addresses the issues of racism, slavery, inequality, and displacement, learning the ways in which authors utilize characters, language, and theme to express the challenges facing America in this period; speaking and listening skills will be developed through a presentation project.
  • Unit 6: Modernism in America: Students will be introduced to the characteristics that define literature as modern and analyze those characteristics in poetry, fiction, and drama; students will be expected to utilize skills that involve writing literary analysis essays, reviewing and revising their written work, conducting structured academic research, and constructing oral and visual presentations.
  • Unit 7: Post-World War II: Students will examine the literature that followed the Second World War and takes students up to what is known as the postmodern period in literature, interpreting cultural context, dissecting the form and structure of poetry and literature, conducting organized research, and utilizing speaking and listening skills through varied presentations. Students will also analyze the ways in which the media presents information and its effect on public opinion, in addition to creating their own media messaging.

State: National
Grade Level: 11
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English Grade 10 (1140) VA

English Grade 10 (1140) VA

Students will gain valuable cultural insight as they read and write about works depicting the social, personal, religious, and political struggles and triumphs faced by people all over the world and all through history. Students will continue to build their literacy skills by engaging in active reading, composition, speaking and listening activities, vocabulary study, and focused research projects. To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to whichthey apply those skills. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will continue to develop their understanding of effective communication, as well as gain a broader perspective of literature. 

  • Unit 1: Coming of Age: Students will examine works that reflect the universal theme of crossing the threshold into maturity, analyzing literary elements such as theme, motif, rhetoric, and archetypes, as well as the impact of author background and culture. 
  • Unit 2: The Struggle Against Injustice: Students will complete an analytical reading ofAnimal Farm, evaluating the powerful political message of the text, and the way the author utilizes methods such as characterization and allegory to communicate his purpose. They will also begin a critical study of the role of media in society and culture, evaluating media from several sources to determine its agenda, message, and tone.
  • Unit 3: Fighting for Freedom: Students will read works that have been selected because they represent the struggle for freedom, covering different countries, cultures, centuries and genders, and will be introduced to the power of literary, religious, and philosophical traditions that influenced writer from other cultures. 
  • Unit 5: Perspectives in World Literature: Students will examine literature that offers a wide world perspective, includingNectar in a Sieve, varied poetry, and work by Gandhi; students will apply their analysis skills to explore elements such as themes, narrative structure, symbolism, and context, utilizing writing skills to compose well-structured arguments.
  • Unit 6: Cultural Context of Writing: Using culture as a context, students will focus on utilizing inference skills to analyze theme and author purpose, composing several written works that require reading comprehension, well-developed literary analysis, and strong research skills.
  • Unit 7:Things Fall Apart: Students will incorporate research and historical/cultural context in their exploration of the post-colonial South African novel, Things Fall Apart, progressing into an analysis of the rhetoric and logical of politically-charged literature and speeches of South Africa. 
  • Unit 8: Tradition vs. Change: Students will encounter works that illuminate the theme of the conflict between tradition and change, focusing heavily on project-based work, including a speaking and listening project and an advanced research project that requires students to employ such skills as paraphrasing, proper citations, and determining credible research sources.

State: National
Grade Level: 10
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

Earth Science I (4210) VA

Earth Science I (4210) VA

Earth Science I (4210) VA is a basic science course intended to further explore the designs and patterns of our planet. This course covers such areas as the origin, history, and structure of the earth. It also covers forces that cause change on the earth and features of the earth including the crust, water, atmosphere, weather, and climate. Earth science wraps up with astronomyand a study of all the planets, the solar system, and galaxies. The course strives to teach that each feature of the earth interacts with the others in many critical ways, and the study of these relationships is important to humanity.Students at this level should show development in their understanding of scientific inquiry. Some of the units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop meaning and to actively engage the student. The continued exposure to science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the students' skill and understanding.

  • Origin of the Earth: Students will explore the theories of the origin of the universe and the Earth.
  • History of the Earth: Students will explore methods for determining the age of the Earth and its geologic history.
  • Dynamic Structure of Earth: Students will explore the changes and cycles constantly affecting the Earth.
  • Forces and Features of Earth: Students will explore the forces at work on the Earth, such as earthquakes and volcanoes and how to use maps.
  • Features of Earth’s Crust: Students will explore rocks, minerals and other resources.
  • Shaping Earth’s Crust: Students will explore the forces that shape the Earth’s crust, such as weathering and erosion, and other constructive and destructive forces.
  • Earth’s Water: Students will explore the water cycle and the different bodies of water on the Earth.
  • Earth’s Atmosphere: Students will explore the make-up of the Earth’s atmosphere and the impact of humans on the atmosphere.
  • Earth’s Weather and Climate: Students will explore weather and climate and how to measure and predict weather.
  • Astronomy: Students will explore the solar system and other celestial bodies in the universe.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science
Course Length: Year

Chemistry I (4410) VA

Chemistry I (4410) VA

Chemistry I (4410) VA is intended to provide a more in-depth study of matter and its interactions. In preceding years students should have developed an understanding for the macroscopic properties of substances and been introduced to the microstructure of substances. This chemistry course will expand upon that knowledge, further develop the microstructure of substances and teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas, equations, and symbols.  The major concepts covered are measurement in chemistry, atomic structure, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, chemical equilibrium, and organic chemistry. Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for the student and actively engage the student. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the student's skill and understanding.Chemistry I (4410) VA should be preceded by an Algebra I course and preceded or accompanied by an Algebra II course.

  • Measurement and Analysis: Students will identify and relate different types of laboratory measurements.
  • Starting the Investigation: How to Identify Elements, Compounds, and Mixtures: Students will differentiate between the chemical and physical properties of elements, compounds, and mixtures.
  • Exploring Laws for Gases and Conservation of Mass: Students will solve problems using the kinetic molecular theory, the gas laws and the conservation of mass.
  • The Discovery of Atoms: Nature’s Building Blocks: Students will describe the history and current atomic theory.
  • Molecular Structure: Students will calculate stoichiometry, chemical bonding, and polar properties of different substances.
  • Chemical Reactions, Rates and Equilibrium: Students will analyze chemical changes, reaction rates, and factors that affect equilibrium.
  • Equilibrium Systems: Students will define parameters of solutions and equilibrium systems.
  • Carbon Chemistry: Hydrocarbons: Students will describe organic compounds and distinguish between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons.
  • Carbon Chemistry: Functional Groups: Students will describe and explain the purpose of functional groups in hydrocarbons.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science
Course Length: Year

Biology I (4310) VA

Biology I (4310) VA

Biology I (4310) VA is intended to expose students to the designs and patterns of living organisms and their interactions with the environment. In preceding years, students should have developed a foundational understanding of life sciences. Expanding on that, this Biology course will incorporate more abstract knowledge. The student’s understanding should encompass both the micro and macro aspects of life, and this biology course includes both. The major concepts covered are taxonomy, the chemical basis of life, cellular structure and function, genetics, microbiology, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, and ecology and the environment.

Students at this level should show development in their understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for students and that actively engage them. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the students’ skills and understanding.Biology I (4310) VA should be preceded or accompanied by an Algebra I course.

  • Biology: The Study of Life: Students will define the steps of, and apply, the scientific method, identify the characteristics of life, and how living organisms are classified.
  • Biochemistry: Students will investigate the chemicals and reactions of life processes.
  • Cells: Students will identify the structure and functions of plant and animal cells.
  • Cell Energy: Students will identify how energy flows in cells and ecosystems, including photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and compare patterns between plant and animal cells.
  • Cell Division and Reproduction: Students will compare and relate the processes involved in cell division and reproduction.
  • Genetics and Heredity: Students will explore the basics of genetics, heredity, and the patterns and evidence of evolution.
  • Microbiology and Biodiversity: Students will be able to describe the characteristics of the different kingdoms, Protista, fungi, plantae, and Animalia
  • Plants: Students will recognize that plants create their own energy via photosynthesis, how plants grow and reproduce, and their uses.
  • Animals and Humans: Students will interpret the body systems of animals and humans, and their functions.
  • Ecology and the Environment: Students will explore the interactions between living organisms and the environment.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science
Course Length: Year

Algebra II (3143) VA

Algebra II (3143) VA

Algebra II is a full-year, high school math course intended for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course Algebra I. This course focuses on algebraic techniques and methods in order to develop student understanding of advanced number theory and concepts involving linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, radical, and polynomial functions. Students also explore statistical concepts, applying their understanding of functions to solve problems.

  • Structure and Functions: Student will review the properties of functions, determine the domain, range, and inverse of a function, and simplify expressions by combining like terms and applying rules for exponents.
  • Linear Functions: Student will determine the slope of a line and use that information to write an equation, compare lines, and solve a system of equations using the addition property of equality, the substitution property of equality, and graphical methods.
  • Inequalities and Absolute Value: Student will solve and graph inequalities, including absolute value inequalities in one or two variables. 
  • Polynomials: Student will factor polynomials, including applying their understanding of the difference of two squares, perfect square trinomials, and the difference of two cubes. The student will also solve problems involving direct variation, inverse variation, and joint or combination variation.
  • Algebraic Fractions: Student will add, subtract, multiply, and divide with rational expressions, as well as solve and graph rational equations and functions that model mathematical and real-world situations.  
  • Real Numbers: Student will evaluate and simplify expressions containing radicals and fractional exponents and solve quadratic equations and systems of quadratic equations using a variety of methods. The student is also introduced to the concept of imaginary numbers and complex solutions.  
  • Functions: Student will explore a variety of functions and systems of equations, including exponential, absolute value, radical, and piece-wise defined functions.  
  • More Functions: Student will deepen the understanding of inverse functions, understanding the inverse relationship of exponential and logarithmic functions. 
  • Statistics: Student will algebraically represent sequences and series, including arithmetic and geometric, and distinguish between permutations and combinations. The student will also describe properties of normal distributions and solve statistical problems with linear, quadratic, and exponential models.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

Algebra I (3130) VA

Algebra I (3130) VA

Algebra I is a full year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic concepts covered in the prerequisite course, Grade Eight Math. Within the Algebra I course, the student will explore basic algebraic fundamentals such as evaluating, creating, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic functions.

  • Foundations of Algebra: Student will identify different real number properties, and how to use them to simplify and evaluate algebraic expressions.
  • Linear Equations: Student will translate word problems into algebraic equations and solve them using real number properties.
  • Functions: Student will understand the characteristics of linear functions, representing them both algebraically and graphically.
  • Inequalities and Linear Systems: Student will write, graph, and solve inequalities using real number properties. In addition, the student will determine the solution of a pair of linear equations or inequalities, graphically or algebraically.
  • Polynomials: Student will add, subtract, multiply, and divide monomials and polynomials, as well as factor polynomials using several different methods.
  • Exponents and Roots: Student will simplify exponential expressions using the rules of exponents. In addition, the student will apply their understanding of exponents to explore exponential functions.
  • Quadratics: Student will identify, write, and graph quadratic functions and solve quadratic equations and inequalities using several different methods.
  • Statistics: Student will determine the central tendencies of a given data set, as well as use a linear or quadratic function to model and describe the set.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

English Grade 7 (1110) VA

English Grade 7 (1110) VA

Students will demonstrate their understanding of various works by analyzing how common themes like exploration and courage are able to transcend diverse time periods and genres. They will develop their writing skills as they focus on the six traits of writing while producing persuasive, narrative, expository, and reflective compositions. With a strong emphasis on close reading instruction, research activities, and speaking and listening tasks, this course will help students expand their understanding of literature and nonfiction while building twenty-first century skills. Students will be exposed to classic and contemporary texts to become critical consumers of information, story, and point of view. 

  • Unit 1: Reading Skills: Students will demonstrate a mastery of the foundational reading skills necessary to succeed in this course and are provided with an opportunity for review and practice to ensure preparation and understanding. Topics include types of literature, grammar, the process for decoding unknown vocabulary, reading comprehension, and analysis.
  • Unit 2: Call of the Wild: Students will examine Jack London's The Call of the Wild, interpreting characters, events, literary elements, author purpose, tone, and theme with a critical eye. 
  • Unit 3: Writing Skills: Narrative and Expository:Students will demonstrate prewriting skills, organizational skills, and editing skills as they compose narrative texts. Students will develop their editing skills in punctuation, grammar, and structure, both individually and in peer groups.
  • Unit 4: Reading Nonfiction: Students will examine the structure, form, and organization of a variety of nonfiction texts, including literary nonfiction, business letters, technical writing, and informative essays. Students will read Helen Keller'sThe Story of My Life, as well as analyze texts for purpose and viewpoint as they determine which sources of information are credible. 
  • Unit 5: Persuasive Writing and Communication Skills: Students will engage in expository writing, following appropriate structure, purpose, audience, and prewriting strategies. They will work with others in a peer editing environment. Students will recognize what type of purpose, structure, or style might be appropriate for a specific audience. Students will learn the purpose of reflective writing as it relates to expository texts and the writing process.
  • Unit 6: Poetry and Drama: Students will explore poetry and drama, including The Diary of Anne Frank. Students will participate in classroom discussions, following agreed-upon rules for interaction. They will also analyze speakers and produce their own speeches. Students will demonstrate media literacy and create multi-media presentations.

State: National
Grade Level: 7
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year