At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the Ohio Learning Standards.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Corrections: Policies and Procedures

Corrections: Policies and Procedures

Corrections is one of the three branches of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) in the United States. All three branches employ personnel who are authorized to uphold and enforce the law and are required to operate under the rule of law. Each branch works as part of the entire system to maintain the public safety and well-being and bring criminals to justice. Corrections facilities and programs are run by a complex system of policies and procedures, which uphold local, state, and federal laws. This course gives students an introductory, yet thorough view of many aspects of corrections operations. Students receive historical and legal background information as they study how prisons and prisoners have evolved into correctional facilities and programs for offenders. In this course the duties responsibilities, conduct, training, and special certification possibilities for corrections staff are explored. Many aspects of procedures in corrections are reviewed, giving students an in-depth look at what a variety of careers in this growing field encompass and require.

Corrections within the Criminal Justice System: Unit 1 introduces students to the three branches of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections, and how they interact in managing criminals and criminal activity. The unit provides a brief history of how corrections, as a term, came to be used, and the focus of the system today in helping offenders rebuild their lives. The three branches within corrections, facilities, and programs operating at the local, state, and federal levels, are further explored.
Impact of Laws on the Corrections Service: Unit 2 focuses on the law, and how it and its interpretation historically have mandated changes to corrections policies and procedures. Bill of Rights amendments, intervention or restrictions on intervention of the different branches of the CJS, and landmark Supreme Court cases involving prison conditions and prisoners’ rights are also explored. Students gain a working knowledge of the relationship between federal and state laws, societal changes in interpretation of rights, actual events that changed policy, and the reasons behind adjustments to conditions inside facilities.
Effective Communications and Ethical Staff Conduct: Unit 3 examines effective communication skills and techniques, and why they are important in corrections work. Communicating effectively utilizes various methods of speaking, listening, observation, and special services and aids for special disabilities. Corrections staff is trained in communications appropriate for different situations, incidents, and person. Effective communication can avert crises, prevent incidents, and resolve hostage crises. Students examine and test their own communications skills.
High Liability in Corrections Services: Use of Force, Crisis and Emergency Responses: Unit 4 takes a close look at the law, policy, procedure, and examples requiring the use of force.
Security Facilities, and Computer Forensics: This unit examines safety and security in corrections environments, and how risk-management policy and procedures avoid incidents, security breaches, emergencies, and illegal activities.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Transportation and Tours for the Traveler

Transportation and Tours for the Traveler

This course looks at transportation and package tours. During this course, students will learn about the package tour industry today, the travel industry professionals, and the package tour customers. Students will find out who tour operators must work with to create travel products and what kinds of decisions they must make in terms of meal, lodging, attractions, and, of course, transportation. You will read about how a tour operator plans and markets a tour and discover what happens before the tour, during the tour, and after the tour. Finally, students will learn about how technology, events such as 9/11 and the global recession, and increased environmental awareness are affecting the travel industry today. By focusing on all the different components that go into creating a tour, you will be able to get a sense of what working for a tour operator entails as well as what other careers are available in the tour industry. Having this perspective will help you better understand the process you undergo as you plan your own vacations and give you the background to feel comfortable entering the tour industry.

  • Who’s Who in the Tour Business: This unit begins by exploring the history of package tours and transportation as it relates to tours, what exactly a package tour is, and the profile of customers who take tours. It also introduces students to the travel industry profession, which ranges from tour operations who create travel packages to travel agents, who resell travel products and advise customers.
  • Suppliers: This unit begins with discussions about supplier-tour operator dynamics and how tour operators work with attractions, dining, and accommodation suppliers. It also helps students understand the vital role of transportation, ranging from cars to trains. The unit also offers insight into yield management, load factor, and break-even points, all of which are important factors in the business of travel. Finally, the unit also introduces students to the cruise industry, including how it started, and the advantages and disadvantages for tour operators and consumers.
  • Researching and Designing the Tour: This unit is all about the tour experience, including planning itineraries, pacing, and logistical issues such as moving a tour group from one point to the next. It also offers insight into negotiating with suppliers, and discusses budgets, costs, and pricing for package travel.
  • Selling the Tour: Marketing is the focus in this unit. It helps students understand the role of research, the marketing plan, and marketing promotions. It also covers the primary promotional tools, which are advertising, sales promotions, and public relations. Specific kinds of marketing are also investigated, such as direct marketing, marketing to preformed groups, and the tour brochure.
  • On the Tour and Beyond: This unit covers how tour operators prepare customers for the tour, and takes a detailed look at the tour director and his or her roles as well as the logistical issues the director faces daily. It also covers what happens after a tour is over, current issues in transportation and tours, and careers paths in the tour industry.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Hospitality & Tourism
Course Length: Semester

Sustainable Service Management for Hospitality and Tourism

Sustainable Service Management for Hospitality and Tourism

This comprehensive course will cover the principles and practices of sustainable service management. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of socially, environmentally, and financially sustainable hospitality management. The course will provide a sustainable approach to service management, incorporating the role of the customer, employee, leaders, and the environment. After successful completion of this course, students will understand and be able to explain the fundamentals of sustainability in the hospitality industry.

Objectives

  • Articulate the importance of customer-centered service in the hospitality industry
  • Know how to empower employees to create sustainable service
  • Be able to describe leadership qualities that contribute to a sustainable service environment
  • Be able to identify drivers of sustainable success in service businesses
  • Understand how green policies and social profit benefit the planet and the bottom line

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Hospitality & Tourism
Course Length: Semester

Planning Meetings and Special Events

Planning Meetings and Special Events

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of planning meetings and special events. Being a meetings and special events planner is both demanding and rewarding. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects this profession will grow by 43.7 percent between 2010 and 2020. It's not all fun and parties, though. In 2012, Career Cast ranked being an event planner as the sixth most stressful job, with soldiers and firefighters holding the top two positions. That's because a meeting coordinator is responsible for every detail of an event. Planners must know how to communicate, be empathetic, and think of their clients. It's crucial to remember that in some instances the event will be a once-in -a-lifetime occasion, so it's important to get it right.

  • The Big Business of Meetings and Special Events: This unit offers an historical overview of the meetings and special events industry and how it has grown to be an annual $273 billion industry in America. It also reviews different types of meetings and helps students learn to communicate with those in the convention and visitor industry. Students will also learn about committees, supervision styles, and how to set up work schedules.
  • It All Comes Down to the Plan: This unit, students become familiar with definitions needed to work in this industry, and why it is so important to lay the foundation for a meeting or special event. Students will also start to develop a network and became familiar with the professional associations. The tools of the meetings and special event planner trade are also reviewed: smartphones, iPad, computers, and the Internet. Finally, students will learn about developing budgets.
  • Getting Organized: This unit is all about getting organized. In this part of the course, students will work through topics such as site selection and how to map meeting room space using the latest apps. Students will also understand how to work with suppliers, and the importance of using precise language and getting everything on paper.
  • F & B, Equipment and Getting It Out There: Unit Four discusses food and beverage (F & B) and equipment. Students will learn about the different kinds of food set-ups, how to use pipe-and-drape, and the importance of checking everything twice. Students will also learn about working with mass media, and about using the Internet and SEO for promotion.
  • Logistics: This unit the transportation logistics of meetings and international considerations. Students will learn how to organize transportation, monitor shuttle services, and understand airport codes. Students will also gain the knowledge to develop evaluations that will provide valuable feedback to improve future meetings.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Hospitality & Tourism
Course Length: Semester

Marketing and Sales for Tourism and Hospitality

Marketing and Sales for Tourism and Hospitality

Marketing and Sales for Tourism and Hospitality Course OverviewThis course is designed as an introduction to the study of tourism and hospitality marketing and sales. Students will be introduced to marketing theory and application of the basic principles of marketing as applied in hospitality and tourism. The relationship between marketing and other functions such as advertising, sales techniques, and public relations to maximize profits in a hospitality organization is addressed. Students will have an opportunity to explore this multi-faceted world, identifying multiple career paths and opportunities.

  • Introduction to Marketing: This unit introduces students to marketing and sales. Students learn about the historical development of the field, and about the core principles of marketing. The also learn the importance of the differences between marketing and sales. Students will also explore components of a marketing plan, and about a technique to evaluate the effectiveness of a plan.
  • Marketing Research and Analysis: Because travel is both a product and a service, it needs a unique marketing strategy. Students will learn how to develop that strategy, as well as about market segmentation and research for the travel industry.
  • Marketing Strategy and Planning: Specifics about promotion and sales are covered in this unit, which also details the use of promotion as a component of the marketing mix. Students also learn about the importance of effective selling and the importance of closing the sale.
  • Delivering Hospitality Services to Customers: This unit reviews the wide variety of distribution methods typically used to promote tourism and hospitality to the travel trade and customers. It also reminds students of the importance of customer needs and wants and how to obtain this information through technology and market research.
  • Career Opportunities in Tourism and Hospitality: This unit discusses the career paths of tourism entities and hospitality businesses, the skills needed to work in tourism and hospitality, and the educational levels that are essential today to perform in an exceedingly competitive arena.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Hospitality & Tourism
Course Length: Semester

Food Safety and Sanitation

Food Safety and Sanitation

This comprehensive course will cover the principles and practices of food safety and sanitation that are essential in the hospitality industry for the protection and well-being of staff, guests and customers. The course will provide a systems approach to sanitation risk management and the prevention of food contamination by emphasizing the key components of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) food safety system. After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to meet the requirements of state and national certification exams.

  • Facing up to the Importance of Food Safety: This unit introduces students to methods of safely handling food, both in the kitchen and throughout food facilities, as well as good practices for personal hygiene for food handlers.
  • Food Travel Path: The Flow of Food Through the Operation: This unit teaches how managers examine the flow of food, identify the types of food that are at risk of contamination, and then establish critical control points in the flow of food to apply the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) process during the receiving, storing, preparing, holding, and serving processes.
  • Clean and Sanitary Facilities and Equipment: Clean and sanitary facilities and equipment are basic components in any HACCP system. In unit, students learn how to maintain cleanliness by establishing a master schedule of when different facilities are cleaned and stocked with proper supplies, who will do it, and what constitutes cleanliness. Students will also learn about proper handling of cleaning supplies.
  • Accident Prevention and Crisis Management: Students will learn that an important role of the foodservice manager is to look closely at the facility, the equipment, and employee behavior to identify safety hazards. Students will also learn about the types of injuries that may occur in a foodservice establishment and how to prepare for them. Compliance with OSHA standards will also be covered.
  • Sanitation Management: Students will learn that to successfully implement a training program, the manager must assess and analyze the training needs of employees by looking at critical control points and making sure there are written directions for each procedure and that each employee is fully aware of his or her responsibilities. Students will also learn about different management roles in a food service facility as well as about the different types of food styles a restaurant may serve.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Hospitality & Tourism
Course Length: Semester

Software Development Tools

Software Development Tools

This course introduces students to the variety of careers related to programming and software development. Students will gather and analyze customer software needs and requirements, learn core principles of programming, develop software specifications, and use appropriate reference tools to evaluate new and emerging software. Students will produce IT-based strategies and a project plan to solve specific problems and define and analyze system and software requirements.

Objectives

  • Understand the development of the computer.
  • Be able to describe the organization of the Central Processing Unit.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of widely used software applications (e.g., word processing, database management, spreadsheet development).
  • Identity three levels of programming languages.
  • Identity execution differences between interpreted, translated, and compiled languages.
  • Describe how computers address data in memory.
  • Design structures, classes, and objects that include variables and methods.
  • Summarize how data is organized in software development.
  • Understand the standard primitive types and operations of the java programming language.
  • Define and initialize Java arrays.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the basics of structured, object-oriented language.
  • Write software applications using while, do while, for, for-each loops. 
  • Define logic statements using if, else if, else and switch statements.
  • Develop an application using conditional statements.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of key constructs and commands specific to a language.
  • Develop an application that responds to user input.
  • Develop a web application that responds to user input.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Information Technology
Course Length: Semester

New Applications: Web Development in the 21st Century

New Applications: Web Development in the 21st Century

New Applications introduces students to the rapidly evolving world of apps, or applications. The introduction of the Apple II in 1977 followed by the IBM PC and scores of compatible computers just four years later created strong consumer demand for software programs, as these applications were referred to at the time. Capable of formatting spreadsheets, composing and proofing hundreds of lines of text, or supporting classroom instruction, computer programs were initially sold by specialty stores, college bookstores, or through the mail.

The explosive growth of the Internet that followed at the beginning of the twenty-first century with the introduction of high-speed networking, the dynamic World Wide Web, and most recently the development of affordable smartphones and web tablets have all contributed to global, cultural, and societal change.

This course begins with a historical tour of the Internet and World Wide Web as well as the programs and applications that made it possible for computer users on every continent to begin to explore and better understand their world. Then, through astep-by-step introduction to WordPress, students gain the tools and insight necessary to create their own web pages and discover their online voice.

In addition to learning how to use WordPress and other applications that promote students' presence on the World Wide Web, this course discusses how the web has become the foremost channel for the distribution of applications that increase the functionality of the web and support a global hub of social networking and communication. Students are introduced to the evolution of networking and data-transfer capabilities beginning with early HTTP protocols continuing through to the recent introduction of smartphones capable of connecting to sites on the World Wide Web without having to rely on a browser for navigation.

The course concludes with a survey of the continuing explosion of new apps, or applications, designed to operate on one or more of the proprietary mobile devices (smartphones, tablets, and netbooks). Students are given an opportunity to track fundamental changes in this growing industry as development has moved from the original model of a single experienced programmer developing a single app for distribution at little or no cost to a model in which retailers, non-profit organizations, government agencies, and Fortune 500 companies contract with mid-sized marketing and communications firms to develop sophisticated apps designed to raise global market and public awareness of institutions and issues. Additionally, students have an opportunity to understand that career opportunities in app development have evolved from programming and coding to now include marketing, public relations, creative arts, project and product management and sales, with a growing number of careers in the industry requiring little if any actual programming experience.

New Applications is a survey course that travels from the first software programs developed to facilitate communication on the Internet to the new generation of mobile and native apps that access the Internet without a reliance on a web browser. New Applications is also a practical course in how to develop a presence on the World Wide Web using WordPress and other available web-application tools. The goal of the course is to provide the learner insight into the rapidly evolving universe of programming and application development so that he or she can make informed career decisions in an industry that is changing as quickly as it is growing.

Objectives

  • Describe major advances in network and communications technology beginning with the early Internet and continuing through the introduction of web-enabled smartphones and other devices.
  • Create a web presence using simple applications.
  • Evaluate and select from a variety of web development tools and apps those most appropriate for their interests and needs.
  • Design a current generation app for use on a smartphone or tablet.
  • Evaluate the education and training qualities and experiences essential to secure a position with growth potential in the app industry.

This is an introductory course in the history and development of new applications for use on web-enabled devices including personal computers, tablets, smartphones, and ultra-books. While there are no specific prerequisites for this course, students should have a basic understanding of the Internet, the World Wide Web, browsers, file formats, hardware, and software applications. Students who have working knowledge of IP addressing, programming, the differences among local, wide-area, and cloud-computing networks as well as the current state of mobile devices will be well prepared to complete this course

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Information Technology
Course Length: Semester

Network System Design

Network System Design

The Network System Design course will provide students with an understanding of computer networks and how they operate, as well as a basic understanding of how to manage and maintain computer networks. These skills will provide students with theability to design, configure, and troubleshoot networks of all sizes.Students will learn the basics of network design, including how to identify network requirements and determine the proper network architecture. They will be instructed on the requirements of network models, as well as be introduced to local area networks. Students will also learn about Internet Protocol and the basics of routing data on a network.Students will be introduced to wide area networks and network security issues. In addition, students will learn about networkmanagement, including monitoring and troubleshooting. Last, students will learn about network operating systems and their role in connecting computers and facilitating communications.

Objectives

  • Understand computer networks and their functions, as well as know how to analyze business and technical goals of a network to effectively meet customer needs.
  • Identify requirements to successfully support network users, applications, and devices. They will also understand network architecture and topology, protocols, and services of local and wide area networks.
  • Identify principles and operation of equipment like wire and circuits, as well as of standards such as open system interconnection, TCP/IP, and high-speed networking.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of security requirements and data protection on a network, as well as the role of security tools such as routers, firewalls, and virtual private networks.
  • Understand network operating systems and be able to support computer networks.

For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of computer hardware (desktop and laptop), as well as desktop operating systems.

If students are not familiar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required, that they be introduced to computer hardware and desktop or workstation operating systems before starting this course. That includes examining hardware devices such as motherboards, hard drives, and processing chips and exploring the features and functions of a workstation operating system.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Information Technology
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Network Systems

Introduction to Network Systems

How can we automate the transfer of information from one computer to another? To answer that question, this course introduces students to the fundamental technology and concepts that make networking systems possible. The question itself is a very practical one and the concepts taught are more concerned with practices and processes rather than theoretical generalities.

The most important concept introduced is that of the OSI reference model and its bottom four layers, which are most directly concerned with networking instead of computing. Each networking layer is explored in a three-lesson chapter. By the end of the course, every student should be comfortable reading a sentence that says something like, “X is a protocol working at the third layer.”

The course also explores a good deal of technology, specifically the software and hardware supporting LANs, WANs, and Wi-Fi networks. Particularly important are the protocols in the TCP/IP stack that are used to communicate across a network, but the students are also introduced to the hardware, including hubs, switches, bridges, routers, and transmission media. The studentis expected to learn that a network is not some mysterious idea out there in cyberspace. It is a mechanism that is fully dependent on its parts working properly.

Once the students understand the fundamentals of the layers and network hardware, they can be introduced to questions of security, network management, and network operating systems. In particular, they should understand the role of the server. They have already encountered many examples of client-server relationships, and the material later in the course should introduce them to the many roles that a server can play as a part of a network.

Objectives

  • State the purpose of a computer network, and explain the role of network hardware in achieving that purpose;
  • List at least four protocols from the TCP/IP stack and explain how each contributes to data transmission;
  • Explain the technical differences between a LAN and a WAN;•Explain the importance of technical standards in networks;
  • List all seven layers of the OSI reference model and explain what each of the bottom four layers contributes to a network;
  • Compare and contrast the Windows Server and Linux operating systems.

Students who are unfamiliar with computers and/or the Internet are likely to be at a disadvantage in this course. There are, however, no theoretical concepts required or expected for students entering the course.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Information Technology
Course Length: Semester