At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the New York Learning Standards, Core Curriuclum, and Framework.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Physics

Physics

03151 NY

Physics is intended to provide a more in-depth study of the physical universe. In preceding years students should have developed a basic understanding for the macroscopic and microscopic world of forces, motion, waves, light, and electricity. The physics course will expand upon that prior knowledge and further develop both. The curriculum will also seek to teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas and symbols used in physics. The major concepts covered are kinematics, forces and motion, work and energy, waves, sound and light, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear physics

Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for students and actively engage them. The continued exposure to science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the students' skill and understanding.

Physics should be preceded by Algebra I and II courses and Geometry.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

  • Use scalars and vectors to visualize and calculate concepts of motion.

  • Articulate Newton's and Kepler's laws of motion.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how energy is transferred and changed from one form to another.

  • Describe how sound and light waves act and react.

  • Differentiate between static and current electricity and describe each one.

  • Know the relationship between magnetism and electricity.

  • Have a general understanding of atomic theory, including fusion and fission.

State: New York
Grade Level: 12
Category: Science
Course Length: Year

Trigonometry

Trigonometry

Trigonometry is a five-unit elective course for high school students who have successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The materials cover a development of trigonometry from right triangle trigonometry to oblique triangles and the polar plane. Throughout the course, students will develop trigonometric formulas and use them in real-world applications, evaluate trigonometric proofs using complex trigonometric identities and solving trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle.

The course seeks to help students expand their knowledge and skills so that they may achieve the following goals:

  • Use trigonometry as a tool for indirect measurement.
  • Model natural phenomenon with trigonometric functions.
  • Perform operations with complex numbers using trigonometry.
  • Use trigonometric identities to evaluate trigonometric proofs and solve trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle.
  • Solve for unknown sides and angles of right and oblique triangles using right triangle trigonometry, law of sines and law of cosines.

In attaining these goals, students will begin to see the "big picture" of mathematics and understand how numeric, algebraic, and geometric concepts are woven together to build a foundation for higher mathematical thinking.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Semester

Earth Science

Earth Science

03001 NY

Earth Science is a basic science course intended to further explore the designs and patterns of our planet. This course covers such areas as the origin, history, and structure of the earth. It also covers forces that cause change on the earth and features of the earth including the crust, water, atmosphere, weather, and climate. Earth science wraps up with astronomy and a study of all the planets, the solar system, and galaxies. The course strives to teach that each feature of the earth interacts with the others in many critical ways, and the study of these relationships is important to humanity.

Students at this level should show development in their understanding of scientific inquiry. Some of the units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop meaning and to actively engage the student. The continued exposure to science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the students' skill and understanding.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

  • Gain increased awareness about where Earth came from, how Earth functions and sustains life, and how the many systems and processes of Earth rely on and balance one another.

  • Improve scientific evaluation skills and apply them to the study of Earth's physical geography and dynamic processes.

  • Discover tools that allow for the study of Earth and its further exploration.

State: New York
Grade Level: 9
Category: Science
Course Length: Year

Chemistry

Chemistry

03101 NY

Chemistry is intended to provide a more in-depth study of matter and its interactions. In preceding years students should have developed an understanding for the macroscopic properties of substances and been introduced to the microstructure of substances. This chemistry course will expand upon that knowledge, further develop the microstructure of substances, and teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas, equations, and symbols.

The major concepts covered are measurement in chemistry, atomic structure, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, and chemical equilibrium. Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for the student and actively engage the student. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the student's skill and understanding.

Chemistry should be preceded by an Algebra I course and preceded or accompanied by an Algebra II course.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

  • Calculate and convert units using scientific notation and significant figures.

  • Explain the differences between elements, compounds, and mixtures.

  • Use Avogadro's number and the gas laws to calculate different variables in chemistry examples.

  • Explain and use the periodic table.

  • Recognize symbols for common elements.

  • Differentiate between the different types of bonds.

  • Predict how different elements will react.

  • Describe acid-base reactions and redox reactions.

State: New York
Grade Level: 11
Category: Science
Course Length: Year

Biology

Biology

03051 NY

Biology is intended to expose students to the designs and patterns of living organisms and their interactions with the environment. In preceding years, students should have developed a foundational understanding of life sciences. Expanding on that, this Biology course will incorporate more abstract knowledge including the micro and macro aspect of life. The major concepts covered are taxonomy, the chemical basis of life, cellular structure and function, genetics, microbiology, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, and ecology and the environment.

Students at this level should show development in their understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for students and that actively engage them. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the students' skills and understanding.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

  • • Demonstrate a knowledge of molecular structure as it relates to organic compounds.

  • • Use a microscope to study microscopic organisms.

  • • Describe cells, their different parts, and the function of a cell.

  • • Discuss the different parts of a plant.

  • • Describe and explain the function of each system in the human body.

  • • Perform Punnett square functions to determine probability of inheritance.

  • • Differentiate between mitosis and meiosis and between asexual and sexual reproduction.

  • • Classify different animals using taxonomy.

  • • Understand the impact man has on the environment.

State: New York
Grade Level: 10
Category: Science
Course Length: Year

Pre-calculus

Pre-calculus

02110 NY

Pre-calculus is a full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic and conceptual geometric concepts covered in the prerequisite courses: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The course primarily focuses on the skills and methods of analytic geometry and trigonometry while investigating further relationships in functions, quadratics, probability, and number theory.

Upon successfully completing the course, the student should have mastered the following concepts:

  • Perform operations on functions including composition and inverses.

  • Graph, evaluate, and solve exponential, logarithmic, polynomial and rational functions and equations.

  • Utilize the unit circle in evaluating trigonometric identities; prove trigonometric identities; graph trigonometric functions and their inverses.

  • Solve application problems involving right triangle trigonometry, special right triangles, and law of sines and cosines.

  • Graph and operate with complex numbers in the complex plane.

  • Graph and solve quadratic equations that include conic sections.

  • Calculate probabilities, combinations, and permutations.

  • Use matrices to represent relationships and solve problems.

State: New York
Grade Level: 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

Mathematics 8

Mathematics 8

52038 NY

Mathematics 8 is an introductory algebra course designed to prepare junior-high school students for Algebra I. The course focuses on strengthening needed skills in problem solving, rational numbers, equations, and graphing. Students will begin to see the "big picture" of mathematics and learn how numeric, algebraic, and geometric concepts are woven together to build a foundation for higher mathematical thinking.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

  • Gain an increased awareness of how math is a life skill.

  • Understand how math is like a language, with a set of conventions.

  • Explore concepts taught in previous math courses at higher levels and in real world applications.

  • Practice algebraic thinking in order to model and solve real world problems.

  • Utilize new skills and concepts that will help them in future math courses.

  • Investigate the real number system, including irrational numbers.

  • Extend understanding of variable expressions and equations (single and multiple variable).

  • Represent linear functions, describe relationships between dependent and independent variables, and apply linear functions to statistics.

  • Represent geometric transformations both algebraically and graphically.

  • Apply volume concepts to solve mathematical and real-world problems.

State: New York
Grade Level: 8
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

Mathematics 7

Mathematics 7

52037 NY

Mathematics 7 is designed to prepare junior-high students for Pre-algebra. This course focuses on strengthening needed skills in problem solving, number sense, and proportional reasoning. It also introduces students to operations with rational numbers, solving multi-step equations and inequalities, and geometric concepts. Students will begin to see the "big picture" of mathematics and learn how numeric, algebraic, and geometric concepts are woven together to build a foundation for higher mathematical thinking.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

  • Gain an increased awareness of how math is a life skill.

  • Understand how math gives us different ways to model or express the same thing.

  • Explore concepts taught in previous math courses, but at higher levels, applying the concepts to real world situations.

  • Utilize new skills and concepts that will help them in future math courses.

  • Examine the real number system, including rational numbers.

  • Extend understanding of variable expressions and equations.

  • Use proportional reasoning in order to model and solve real-world problems.

  • Explore and extend understanding of probability and statistical concepts.

  • Apply algebraic concepts to solve geometric problems.

  • Apply surface area and volume concepts to solve mathematical and real-world problems

State: New York
Grade Level: 7
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

Consumer Math

Consumer Math

Consumer Math is an introduction to the many ways in which math can be used in everyday life. The course gives practical advice on how to handle situations that involve money and math principles. Consumer Math focuses on the basic skills and methods of arithmetic and provides students the opportunity to develop experience with algebraic techniques of evaluating variables and equations, including geometric formulas and interest equations. Students will also be introduced to topics in statistics.

  • Basic Math Review: Student will apply the rules of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing to signed numbers, fractions with like and unlike denominators, mixed numbers and improper fractions, as well as convert between fractions, decimals and percent’s.
  • Personal Finance: Student will recognize various forms of compensation for employment, identify other methods to earn money, and calculate tips, pay, income needs, and deductions from a paycheck.
  • Statistics: Student will calculate central tendencies, variances, standard deviations, and distribution curves for a set or sets of data, determine probabilities, and analyze balance sheets.
  • Taxes and Insurance: Student will differentiate between the kinds of insurance, how to calculate costs, deductibles, and out of pocket costs, as well as understanding the different types of taxes and tax rates.
  • Banking Services and Investments: Student will become familiar with the different services of a bank, know about estates, wills and trusts, and calculate different types of interest.
  • Banking and Credit Costs: Student will understand credit, how it affects your financial life, how to calculate different types of interest, and determining your account balance in several ways.
  • Purchase and Sale of Goods: Student will calculate prices, discounts and rebates on items, understand insurance premiums, deductibles, and discounts, and determine the cost of renting, leasing, or purchasing a vehicle or home, and other expenses those entail.
  • Leisure, Travel, and Retirement: Student will consider the expenses involved in traveling, different recreations and hobbies, and necessary funds for retirement.
  • Jobs Related Services: Student will use ratio and proportions to solve problems involving electricity, pulley problems, and fulcrum problems, calculate expenses involved in certain jobs, and use area formulas and trigonometric functions to solve real world problems.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

Mathematics 600

Mathematics 600

Math 600 is a full-year elementary math course focusing on number skills and numerical literacy, with an introduction to rational numbers and the skills needed for algebra. In it, students will gain solid experience with number theory and operations, including decimals and fractions. This course also integrates ratio relationships and proportional reasoning throughout the units, as well as introduces students to geometric and statistical concepts.

  • Unit 1: Identify, compare, and calculate problems with decimal numbers
  • Unit 2: Identify, reduce, compare, and represent fractions
  • Unit 3: Use division to solve problems involving fractions
  • Unit 4: Use ratios to solve problems, interpret data, and make comparisons
  • Unit 5: Use rates and percentages to solve problems
  • Unit 6: Calculate the measurements of geometric shapes
  • Unit 7: Identify and use rational numbers and their opposites
  • Unit 8: Identify, use, and compare expressions
  • Unit 9: Translate, write, and solve equations involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
  • Unit 10: Interpret and describe data presented in various graphs
  • Unit 11: Review skills and concepts from throughout the course

State: National
Grade Level: 6
Category: Math
Course Length: Year