At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to Arkansas' Academic Standards and Curriculum Framework.

Scientific Discovery and Development

Scientific Discovery and Development

This course focuses Laboratory Careers, in which students learn about more than two dozen jobs in laboratory science. Each lesson that covers careers describes, sometimes in great detail, what specific professionals do on the job. For each career students learn what is necessary in the areas of education and credentialing, and also will be able to have a good idea of the job outlook and salaries of these various professions. Students also learn quite a bit of science related to many of those careers as well as about the scientists and major breakthroughs that have brought us where we are today in laboratory science.

  • Introduction to Laboratory Science: Students will explore the history of clinical laboratory science, learning how clinical laboratories evolved and became professionalized and how scientific discoveries and breakthroughs fueled the development of the laboratory while the sub-disciplines in biology were also advancing. The science covered in the first unit includes immunology, the circulatory system, and the blood-bank system.
  • Clinical Laboratory Careers: Students will learn about the circulatory system and about microbiology and the subfields within it.
  • Tissues and Cells: Students will explore cells and tissues, cell division and basic genetics.
  • Research and Development: Students will learn a brief history of the philosophy of science, along with an explication of the scientific method. The unit goes on to teach the difference between basic and applied research. This unit also covers three major areas in bioresearch: biotechnology, nanotechnology, and pharmaceutical research and development.
  • Research and Development, Part II: Students will explore research in the social science that is something of a hybrid, since the topics cross over into science. Emphasis is put on the interdisciplinary nature of this type of research. The last few lessons in the unit raise the controversial issues of embryonic stem-cell research and the problems raised by outsourcing clinical research. The final lesson gives students a chance to catch their breath and do some exercises that can help them find a career path they are interested in.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health Science
Course Length: Semester

Public Health: Discovering the Big Picture in Health Care

Public Health: Discovering the Big Picture in Health Care

Public Health: Discovering the Big Picture in Health Care Course OverviewIn this course, we discuss the multiple definitions of public health and the ways that these definitions are put into practice. We explore the five core disciplines and the ways that they interact to reduce disease, injury and death in populations. By understanding the roles of public health, we are able to gain a greater appreciation for its importance and the various occupations that one could pursue within the field of public health. Unit 1 introduces the definition of public health and provides a description that allows you to differentiate public health from other health care fields. The five core disciplines and the interactions between local, state, and federal organizations are also discussed. The history of public health concludes the introductory unit. Unit 2 focuses on specific information regarding the core disciplines of behavioral science and emergency preparedness and response. Unit 3 takes a detailed look at epidemiology and biostatistics. Unit 4 relates to environmental and occupational health issues. Finally, Unit 5 describes global health and the future of public health.

Because of public health’s broad and multi-faceted nature, it is important to understand the details and the overall interactions and importance that make the field essential to modern society. There are many disciplines that work together on different levels within public health. Each public health worker contributes to the overall function of the field itself. By entering the field of public health, you will play an integral part in improving the health and lives of a large number of people. The contributions of public health to society have shaped our modern world and will continue to do so in the future.

  • This is Public Health: Students will explore the history, nature and context of the public health system.
  • Health Education & Behavioral Science (Health Promotion), Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response: Students will learn how to promote public health, and how to coordinate a response to a public health emergency.
  • Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Outbreak Investigation (EIS, Foodnet, PFGE): Students will explore how diseases spread. Investigating and managing outbreaks will also be topics.
  • The CDC, Environmental and Occupational Health: Students learn about the role of the Centers for Disease Control inthis unit that also enlightens them about the importance of a clean environment and the health impacts of population growth.
  • Global Health, The World Health Organization (WHO), and Future Public Health Challenges: The role of the WHO in global health is at the core of this unit, which also explores future world health challenges and choosing the right career in public health.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health Science
Course Length: Semester

Physicians, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians and Other Doctors

Physicians, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians and Other Doctors

This course focuses on preparation for physician-level careers, including dental, veterinary and pharmaceutical, along with a look into the Physician Assistant and alternative medicine systems. This course will also introduce the topics of diversity, and the move toward an emphasis on social and cultural skills in medicine, in addition to academic ability.

These careers are usually the lead in the health care system, directing the care of their patients, whether that is through primary care, direct care, pharmaceuticals, or, if the patients happen to be animals! Generally, requiring a longer course of study and an advanced degree delineates these careers. Their programs are quite often competitive at the entry level.

In this course, we will focus on the preparation for entry to practice, along with navigating the field once you are in it (working as part of a team, dealing with patients, etc.). In order to help you to best choose your career path, we will study different roles, responsibilities, settings, education needs and amounts of patient contact. We will look at things like the degree or training needed for each job, the environment one would work in, how much money the position could make, and the facts of the actual working day.

Then, within each job group, we'll explore important aspects that are applicable to the entire health field, such as behaving ethically, keeping patients safe and free from infections and germs, and following laws and policies. This course will also focus on diversity, and the need for social and cultural skills in medicine, in addition to academic ability.

  • Introduction to Professional Degrees: Students will explore planning for different careers in the health sciences.
  • Physician and Physician Assistant: Students will learn about different types of medical degrees and practices, as well as the profession of physician assistant and its many opportunities.
  • Dentists and Pharmacists: Students will explore the careers of dentistry and pharmacy.
  • Optometry and Veterinary Medicine: Students learn about the professions of optometry and veterinarian medicine and its related fields.
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The role of the alternative medicine in the health field will be the focus of this unit.

Since this course leans heavily on reporting and research, students should already know how to choose appropriate resources (especially online), and how to properly cite those resources.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health Science
Course Length: Semester

Nursing: Unlimited Possibilities and Unlimited Potential

Nursing: Unlimited Possibilities and Unlimited Potential

This course provides students opportunities to compare and contrast the various academic and clinical training pathways to an entry-level position in nursing and to explore the growing number of opportunities for professional advancement given the proper preparation and experience.In this course, students will have several opportunities to learn about the expanding scope of professional practice for registered nurses and better understand the important changes proposed in the education and ongoing professional development of nurses.

  • The Nursing Profession: Students will explore the history of nursing, types and educational requirements of different types of nurses, and ethics and professionalism in nursing.
  • Primary Nursing Positions: Students will learn about the different types of primary nursing positions.
  • Nursing Specialties: Students will explore specialized nursing fields such as operating room, pediatrics, psychiatric, correctional, oncology and orthopedic.
  • More Nursing Specialties: Students continue their exploration of specialized nursing fields. In this unit, they explore fields such as AIDS care, cardiac rehabilitation, ambulatory nursing, infection control, occupational health, and gastroenterology/endoscopy.
  • Nursing Career Alternatives: Careers as a flight nurse, forensic nurse, and travel nurse are reviewed in this unit.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health Science
Course Length: Semester

Forensics: Using Science to Solve a Mystery

Forensics: Using Science to Solve a Mystery

This course is the overview of modern-day forensic science careers at work using science concepts to collect and analyze evidence and link evidence to the crime and suspects in order to present admissible evidence in courts of law. Modern-day forensic science practices have come into being thanks to the contribution of science and legal professions seeking ways to study crime scenes and criminal activities in an effort to stop crime. Of particular interest in this course are the various applications of medicine in the field of forensic science. This course identifies science concepts and critical thinking in the area of forensic science. Following the presentation of the concepts, students are encouraged to conduct online research exploring examples and applying the concepts just learned. Links to case studies and interactive learning tools are supplied along withhigh-quality research sites. Projects are assigned throughout the course that allow students to actively apply the information just learned. These projects include simulated crime-scene investigation, actual DNA separation, development of a cybersecurity plan, and the identification of specific forensic skills used during the course of a very large murder case. The focus of this course is to assist students in making career choices. Secondary school students who complete this course will have gained an awareness of the diversity of careers available in the forensic field. In addition, attention is drawn to many similar careers in medicine and computer science. Included in this overview of careers is the consideration of job descriptions and availability, educational and training requirements, licensing and certification, and typical annual salaries. Students who take this class will become equipped to make more informed career choices in regard to the forensic and medical science fields. At the same time, students will survey the history and scope of present-day forensic science work.

  • Unit 1: History of Forensic Science and DNA Analysis: The history of forensic science considers the contributions of many medical, legal, and law-enforcement professionals. Many early convictions were based on very little physical evidence. During the 1800s, crime-scene investigation and physical-evidence collection methods began to be developed. Many physical-evidence analysis methods depended on scientific innovations such as microscopes and gas chromatography. The personal identification of suspects and victims was based strictly on eyewitness accounts prior to the discovery of the uniqueness of individual fingerprints. The forensic role of modern-day personal identification is the backbone of valid suspect identification. Fingerprinting techniques and databases of the twentieth century have now been replaced with DNA profiling and searchable databases used to screen and identify individuals. This unit also surveyed the many uses of DNA for identification in both forensic and mass-disaster applications.
  • Unit 2: Crime Scene Investigation and Forensic Medical and Dental Professionals: You have been introduced to crime-scene investigation, which is the heart of forensic science. The emergency medical first responders care for the injured found at the scene. The first responding police officers care for the safety of not only those affected by the crime but also all the first responders at the scene. You now know that the first responding police officers are also responsible for the protection of the crime scene until the crime-scene investigator arrives and secures the scene. You have learned there are very specific rules of protocol the entire investigation must follow. This includes the collection and preservation of the evidence as well as documenting the evidence and anyone having contact with the evidence or the crime scene. Following the protocol determines whether or not the evidence will be admissible to the courts. You have been introduced about the importance of understanding the elements of this protocol. Up to this point in the course, you have been introduced to many career forensic scientists trained to assist with the crime-scene investigation and present the evidence to the court. During this unit you have also been introduced to other types of forensic scientists working with the crime-scene investigation team. Some evidence investigators do not come to the crime scene itself; they remain in the crime lab, analyzing the evidence brought to them. Should there be a death connected to the crime, it must be investigated by those who have the training and authority to do so: a coroner, medical examiner, odontologist, or pathologist. Any related mental or emotional issues of the victims or perpetrators must also be addressed by a medical doctor who has psychiatric training.
  • Unit 3: Forensic Biologist, Forensic Chemist, Physical Anthropologist: All crimes and crime scenes are unique. In this unit you learned about biology, chemistry, and anthropology professionals who perform needed services and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Most of these professionals do not work full-time in forensic science, but they do have valuable skills and tools sometimes needed to study the evidence. Although they are not full-time forensic scientists, they must still abide by the protocols of admissible evidence. You have also learned that these professions are often called to testify in court as expert witnesses. During these chapters, you were introduced to some of the most unusual forensic careers and methods. Who would have known that a forensic entomologist studying the insects on a dead body could furnish needed evidence? The various branches of anthropology study the remains of bodies long dead to gather evidence for the case. You now know the importance of specific bones and the science of osteology as it pertains to teaching us more about individuals.
  • Unit 4: Forensic Toxicologist, Computer Forensics, and Forensic Engineering: Once again, you compared the careers and forensic job descriptions of these professionals, many of whom are not full-time forensic investigators. These fields all demand many years of training and experience. The toxicologist studies the poisons and toxins related to the crime. As you know, drugs and alcohol are toxic to the body. Toxicologists are involved in processing crime-related samples of these substances using specially designed equipment, and you reviewed their specific testing methods in this unit. The effects of drugs and alcohol on the body were also covered in these chapters. Forensic engineers andcomputer examiners, unlike most of the rest of the forensic careers, work with machines related to crimes. In this section, you have identified the specific methods and protocol related to these investigations. During the computer-related lessons, you studied and developed security plans for both personal and business computers. You now know that information assurance is a vital part of computer forensics.
  • Unit 5: Developing Careers in Forensic Science: This unit studies some little-known forensic careers in nursing, linguistics, art, photography, and animation. All of these careers are rapidly developing and changing, pioneering new forensic applications. Forensic nursing, linguistics, and animation are very new careers. The incorporation of these professions in the fight against crime has begun within the last twenty years. Crime-scene photography and forensic applications of art are not new, but with the advent of digital technology, individuals trained in these skills are pioneering fields such as videography and digital facial reconstruction. The fields of forensic linguistics and animations are empowered by advancing technology. Forensic nursing developed in response to the trend of increased sexual and domestic violence. These nurses are specially trained to care for the victims of sexual and domestic violence.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health Science
Course Length: Semester

Careers in Allied Health

Careers in Allied Health

In Careers in Allied Health, the focus on select allied health careers, studying a variety of different levels, responsibilities, settings, education needs and amounts of patient contact. We will look at things like the degree or training needed for each job, the environment one would work in, how much money the position could make, and the facts of the actual working day.

Then, within each job group, we will explore important aspects that are applicable to the entire field of allied health, such as behaving ethically, working as a team, keeping patients safe and free from infections and germs, honoring diverse needs of diverse patients, and following laws and policies.

  • Unit 1: Introduction to Allied Health Careers: This unit looks at allied health careers and the allied health industry, including definition of the field and the role that professionals play in the health care field. The first lesson focused on the definition of some essential knowledge, particularly safety, ethics, and the law in the overall healthcare field. These themes were then repeated and applied to specific careers throughout the course. The themes of safety, ethics, diversity, and law are particularly important to this course. The second part of the unit focused on three interrelated careers, all of which have some connection with trauma and the emergency room, giving us a good opportunity to talk about things like blood and bodily fluids, personal protective equipment, and sterile areas.
  • Unit 2: Art and Technology: The first part of this unit focuses on the ways that visual arts can contribute to the medical field. It's true that some students have both an artistic interest and a scientific interest. First, we cover the career of a medical illustrator, including aspects of training for the job. We then approach orthotics and prosthetics, and through this career, we first start seeing the therapeutic aspects and the support aspects of allied careers. Lastly, we venture outside the physical body and think about emotional health in relation to the work of art therapy. The second part of this unit focuses on even more diverse offerings. We cover the therapeutic work of a respiratory therapist, which includes the devastating disease of cystic fibrosis, and in the process learn a lot about how our lungs function. Then, we look at two diagnostic careers: the sonographer and the radiologic technician, the what, where, how and why for these careers. Then on to a new setting: the sleep clinic. The radiologic lesson enables us to delve further into safety concerns when it comes to x-ray radiation and other health threats inherent in the imaging lab.
  • Unit 3: Exercise and Patient Evaluation: This unit focuses on general maintenance of health and the maintenance of health through diagnosis and treatment. The first half is heavily concerned with the physically manipulating the body in order to stay or get “fit” as we walked through three specific fitness careers. We concentrate on both why maintaining physical health in this way is important for the prevention of disease and why this is especially important for the medical professional, which sets an example and has a reputation that somewhat rests on the need to be viewed as healthy. The science of the muscle and obesity provide us with some new medical and scientific information. In the second half, the importance of early diagnosis and treatment is shown through careers that provide diagnosis of disorders involving several parts of the body. We also cover the anatomy of the ear, the nervous system, and talk more about the heart’s function.
  • Unit 4: Health Informatics and Health Administration: This unit focuses on administration and information management. First, you learn there are plenty of jobs to be had in the health field that focus less on patient contact. Second, you learn how health quickly picks up technological innovations, such as those that are concerned with record keeping and information-gathering. Third, this unit provides a picture into the heavily bureaucratic hierarchy that is “over” the health care field and hospitals. You'll have to deal with and interface with this system should you eventually choose a healthcare career, even if it is not a direct part of your job.
  • Unit 5: Counseling, Dietetics, and Choosing a Career in Allied Health: This unit first focuses your attention on some of the more scientific and research-oriented opportunities out there, specifically using the career field of genetics. First, you can see how some diseases and issues come from the genes. Second, you can use a very real and current situation to discuss medical ethics. The second part of the chapter takes our attention back to taking care of our bodies. This time we focus on nutrition and what we put into our bodies. Obviously, these chapters share the common theme of causes of disease and illness, and this information is important for your future career.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health Science
Course Length: Semester

Career Explorations II

Career Explorations II

The Career Explorations II course is designed to give seventh- and eighth-grade students an opportunity to explore various CTE subjects. Specifically, students will be able to learn about careers involving various technical fields from computers to agriculture.

Each unit introduces one particular field and explains its past, present, and future. The goal is to whet students' appetites for these careers. Students can then explore that career in more detail as a high school student.

Objectives

  • Identify the basic components of a computer system and its use within a networking/communications environment.
  • Discuss the history, development, and use of the Internet and mobile computing technology in business and society.
  • Explore systems design and implementation.
  • State the purpose of a computer network and explain the role of network hardware in achieving that purpose.
  • Identify the advancement of agriculture to the present day.•Explain sustainable agriculture and its impact on society.
  • Understand the STEM field along with the concepts, theories, practical applications, and STEM careers.

Career Explorations II: Course Requirements

  • Access to the Internet to view various course-related Web sites and conduct research.
  • Access to Microsoft® PowerPoint® or a similar program.
  • Ability to conduct personal interviews for some projects.

State: National
Grade Level: 7, 8
Category: 1Middle School Courses
Course Length: Semester

Career Explorations I

Career Explorations I

The Career Explorations I course is designed to give seventh- and eighth-grade students an opportunity to explore various CTE subjects. Specifically, students will be able to learn about careers involving human-related services.

Each unit introduces one particular field and explains its past, present, and future. The goal is to whet students' appetites for these careers. Students can then explore that career in more detail as a high school student.

  • Unit 1: Career Management: This unit examines the elements of employment, from the purpose and personal benefits of work to lifelong learning and technology. Students learn about wages and employment benefits, find out how to maintain a time sheet, set lifestyle goals that match their work goals, and attain problem-solving skills. Students will also explore career clusters and begin a project that helps them which career clusters best match their talents and life goals.
  • Unit 2: Introduction to Careers in Health Sciences: In this unit, students learn about the history of health care and its shift from a focus on religion and culture to one a more scientific approach. Students also explore important medical discoveries of the 17th and 18th centuries, and the integration of technology into medicine.
  • Unit 3: Hospitality and Tourism Systems: Travel and tourism is the largest industry in the world, and it continues to grow each year. Employing 7.5 million people in the United States, the travel and tourism industry depends on visitors traveling to or within the United States. In 2010, sixty million international visitors came to the United States and spent $134 billion. Travel is divided into two broad categories: leisure travel and business travel.The industry is made up of various sectors that provide services to people going on vacation, taking a business trip, or visiting an attraction. These sectors include accommodations, transportation, entertainment and attractions, sightseeing and guide services, dining services, and shopping and retail. Within the travel industry, the types of vacation packages or travel products people buy are either considered commodities or experiences.
  • Unit 4: Human Services: In this unit, students will learn about the human services professional who usually works for a government agency or nonprofit organization. He or she provides assistance, counseling, and training to help people change and acquire better coping skills. These professionals do not rescue people; they empower people, and they respect people’s right to self-determination.
    Some of the populations targeted for help by human services professionals include those living in poverty, those suffering from substance abuse and alcoholism, the homeless, victims of domestic abuse, the mentally or physically disabled, and the elderly. Organizations that seek to help such people and employ human services professionals include federal and state agencies, drug and alcohol treatment centers, nursing homes and elder care facilities, women’s shelters, hospitals, psychiatric facilities, schools and universities, police departments, prisons, courts, and many others.
  • Unit 5: Consumer Services: Consumer services organizations are those that provide services to individual consumers, as opposed to businesses. There are many industries represented in consumer services, offering careers in fields such as advertising, apparel, consulting, entertainment, health care, hospitality, law, personal services, online services, real estate, and travel.
    The largest part of any consumer services job is working well with people to solve problems, which requires a positive attitude and good communications skills. Because of the wide range of opportunities and types of jobs in consumer services, educational requirements can vary from a high school diploma and on-the-job training to internships and graduate degrees. Some consumer services career paths, particularly in counseling or sales, require licenses or certifications.

State: National
Grade Level: 7, 8
Category: 1Middle School Courses
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Careers in the Health Sciences

Introduction to Careers in the Health Sciences

This course is an overview of health careers and overriding principles central to all health professions. The course provides a foundation for further study in the field of health science. When students complete the course, they will be able to discuss the potential career choices and have an understanding of basic concepts that apply to these different choices.

  • Unit 1: Science and Technology in Human Health: Many current practices can be traced to ancient ideas. During ancient times, religion and culture were very important factors in determining who could become a physician and in how the physicians and healers diagnosed and treated disease. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, in medicine, there was a shift away from a focus on religion and culture to a more scientific approach. As a result, autopsies were performed, which changed the understanding of anatomy and disease. The shift to a scientific approach also helped physicians and scientists develop new procedures, treatments, and tools. The rise to modern medicine was facilitated by the introduction of technology and the ability to share resources. After the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, there were some important discoveries. Watson and Crick were credited with discovering the structure of DNA. With today’s technology and this knowledge, we are able to diagnose and treat genetic disorders and diseases. Advances in technology created opportunities for new forms of diagnostic techniques; new advances include the CT, MRI, Ultrasound, and PET Scanners. Organ transplant has been made possible by technological advances.
  • Unit 2: Anatomy and Physiology in Health and Disease: Cells are the building blocks of all living things. Cells work together to build tissues. There are four types of tissue in the human body that work together to build organs: epithelial, nervous, muscular, and connective tissue. Organs work together to form systems. The systems work together to make up a human. Each system has a specific function, but all the systems are critical. Cancer, diabetes, and tuberculosis as representative diseases were discussed. Cancer is an abnormal growth in the body. The symptoms of cancer will vary depending on the type of cancer that is present. Cancer treatment will vary but can include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and in some cases, biological therapy. Diabetes is a chronic disease resulting in abnormal blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or the cells stop responding to insulin. Type I diabetes occurs more often in childhood or adolescence; type II diabetes is more common and tends to present itself later in life than type I. Gestational diabetes only occurs during pregnancy. Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is the second largest single agent killer worldwide; the first is HIV/AIDS. About one third of the Earth’s population is infected with TB defining TB as a global pandemic. Smoking and HIV/AIDS increase your risk for contracting TB. When TB is not active, an individual may have no symptoms, but an individual with an active pulmonary TB infection will experience fever, cough, fatigue, night sweats, and weight loss. The treatment for TB is antibiotic therapy.
  • Unit 3: Privacy Ethics, and Safety: The Patient’s Bill of Rights bill of rights was written to standardize high quality care and protect the rights of the patient. The US Federal Government has included this bill of rights in health care law. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), restricts access to patient information and provides guidelines for insurance coverage. HIPAA is an important law that helps prevent discrimination based on health status and requires health care providers and institutions adopt operating procedures that protect the patient. Ethics are a personal moral code, but often, professional associations or groups of individuals with a common focus develop a code of ethics that as a group they agree to abide by. Any breech of this code could result in penalties. OSHA is the occupational safety and health organization established as a result of the Occupational Health and Safety Act passed by Congress in 1970. This act outlines rules and regulations relating to safety procedures and requirements, limits on chemical exposure in the work place, information privacy and employee access to information, requirements for the use of personal protective equipment, and requirements for hazard communication.
  • Unit 4: Communication and Teamwork in the Health Care Environment: Communication and teamwork is imperative in the health care environment. While many organizations followed or may still follow a hierarchal structure, the hierarchal structure in healthcare is beginning put aside and health care teams are being formed. Health care teams use an interdisciplinary approach to patient care, shifting the focus from long-term care to prevention of adverse outcomes. Each team member has a different level of training and expertise and plays a different role in patient care. Health care teams bring together all the different roles and perspectives to build patient centered teams. Effective communication is critical for health care teams. Communication can be written, verbal, and non-verbal. Appearance, attitude and cultural norms are a part of non-verbal communication. It is important for team members to be aware of and embrace cultural differences. Privacy issues are critical when multiple individuals are interacting with patients, their families, and patient records. Professionalism is key in the success and effectiveness of the health care team and includes all aspects of behavior, appearance, and communication.
  • Unit 5: Health Careers: Creating a Diverse Workforce Rapid advances in science and technology have changed the field of medicine, research, and other health sciences. If you decide to pursue a career in health science, math and science courses, as well as a college degree and perhaps an advanced degree will be required. You may be required to become licensed or earn a certification to practice in the field you have chosen. Be sure to understand the requirements of any career you choose. With rapid advances and changes in both medicine and technology, continuing education is increasingly important to keep individuals up-to-date with advances in their field. New discoveries, research, and inventions can also create new career paths. The goal of continuing education is to teach health science personnel new or recent advances in the field and may come in the form of books, videos, conferences, college classes, or online activities. Professional organizations or associations are also important in providing ongoing information and education to their members. An employer, agency like OSHA, or licensing or certification agency may require continuing education or specific training.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health Science
Course Length: Semester

Technology and Business

Technology and Business

Technology and Business is a year-long, high school elective that teaches students technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits needed to make a successful transition into the workplace or postsecondary education. In this course, students gain an understanding of emerging technologies, operating systems, and computer networks. In addition, they create a variety of business documents, including complex word-processing documents, spreadsheets with charts and graphs, database files, and electronic presentations.This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

  1. Emerging Technologies
  2. Operating Systems
  3. Word Processing
  4. Spreadsheets
  5. Databases
  6. Communication Skills
  7. Telecommunications
  8. Electronic Presentations
  9. Computer Networks
  10. Project Management

By the end of the course, the student should be able to do the following:

  • Select the appropriate technology to address business needs.
  • Describe and compare types of operating systems.
  • Use the computer's operating system to execute work responsibilities.
  • Identify the purpose and style of various business documents.
  • Create complex word-processing documents with columns, bulleted lists, tables, and graphs.
  • Improve speed and accuracy of keyboarding.
  • Use spreadsheets to calculate, graph, solve business problems, and make predictions.
  • Perform data-management procedures using database technology. •Demonstrate communication skills for obtaining and conveying information.
  • Send and receive information using electronic mail, following appropriate guidelines.
  • Describe and identify components of the telecommunications industry.
  • Create and deliver an effective presentation following presentation guidelines.
  • Describe the components required to establish a network.
  • Identify the information management requirements and business needs of an organization.
  • Use project-management tools and processes to manage a business project successfully.

Below is a list of generic resources required to complete the course:

  • word-processor software
  • spreadsheet software
  • database software
  • presentation software
  • e-mail

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Year