English I (01001) WA

Students should enter English I with a foundation in fiction, drama, poetry, mythology, and nonfiction. This course will provide them with the opportunity to build on that foundation. They will engage in in-depth analysis of more complex literature, view that literature from its historical perspective, and connect it to other arts. They will write literary analyses, logical arguments, informational/explanatory texts, narratives, and focused research projects. These writing tasks will be both formal and informal. Additionally, they will engage in speaking and listening activities that use and incorporate media and technology. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will grow their vocabulary and their understanding of how to communicate effectively by making skillful choices when expressing themselves with language.

To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. The content is both rigorous and relevant and includes high-quality contemporary works as well as the classics of literature. Students will be enriched as they expand their skills and confidence in English language arts through a comprehensive study.

Student Objectives

  • Develop reading skills, including analysis, evaluation, and interpretation

  • Identify explicit and implicit meaning in literary nonfiction, short stories, novels, epic poetry, drama, philosophical texts, and source materials.

  • Analyze characteristics of fiction—especially characters, setting, theme, style, tone, point of view, figurative language, and historical context.

  • Analyze literary devices, such as figurative language, imagery, mood, irony, symbol, and foreshadowing.

  • Analyze characteristics of literary nonfiction types: variety of form, personal presence, self-reflection, tone, diction, sequencing of ideas, use of rhetoric and rhetorical strategies, historical/cultural influence, relevancy, and sufficiency of support for claims.

  • Analyze characteristics of the epic, including oral tradition, the hero, journey motif, mythology, simile, epithet, invocation, foreshadowing, flashback, and parallel plot.

  • Analyze characteristics of drama (especially Shakespearean): comedy and tragedy, character, dialogue, chorus, spectacle, soliloquy, aside, blank verse, iambic pentameter, allusion, foil, and puns.

  • Develop writing skills, including

    • explanatory: respond to literature, compare treatment of a subject in two different mediums, analyze literature within its historical context, identify and incorporate textual support, vary transitions, use relevant and precise vocabulary, format and document according to MLA guidelines, collaborate, and use the writing process.

    • argumentative: evaluate the effectiveness of subject treatment in two or more mediums, make a claim, support a claim, identify and incorporate textual support, vary transitions, use relevant and precise vocabulary, format and document according to MLA guidelines, collaborate, and use the writing process.

    • narrative: incorporate sensory detail, sequence, reflect, and peer evaluate.

  • Conduct research: Define and refine a research question, evaluate sources, formulate a thesis, synthesize and integrate information, use the MLA style guide, paraphrase, summarize and quote, and incorporate digital media.

  • Analyze and participate in speaking and listening activities, collaborate in discussions, prepare and present a multimedia presentation, and record a speech.

  • Strengthen language skills, such as conventions and vocabulary acquisition and use.

State: Washington
Grade Level: 9
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year