At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the Rhode Island Grade Level, Rhode Island NGSS Arranged by Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI) and Grade Span Expectations and the Rhode Island Common Core Standards.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Algebra II Fundamentals

Algebra II Fundamentals

Algebra II Fundamentals is a full-year, high school math course intended for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course Algebra I. This course focuses on algebraic techniques and methods in order to develop student understanding of advanced number theory, concepts involving linear, quadratic and polynomial functions, and pre-calculus theories. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, as well as introducing students to basic trigonometric identities and problem solving.

  • Set, Structure, and Function: Student will review the properties of sets and functions, determine the domains, ranges and inverses of functions, and simplifying expressions by combining like terms, exponent rules for multiplication and division and exponents.
  • Numbers, Sentences, and Problems: Student will solve linear equations and inequalities using multiplication, addition, and distributive properties, graph absolute value, and compound equations and inequalities, and problems involving rate, distance, and time.
  • Linear Equations and Inequalities: Student will determine the slope of a line and use that information to write an equation, compare lines, and solve a system of equations using the addition property of equality, the substitution property of equality, and graphical methods.
  • Polynomials: Student will factor trinomials using the difference of two squares, the product of the sum of two perfect cubes, perfect square trinomials, and the difference of two cubes, and solve problems involving direct variation, inverse variation and joint or combination variation.
  • Algebraic Fractions: Student will reduce fractions, add and subtract fractions, and change mixed numbers and complex fractions to simple algebraic fractions, and solve equations that contain algebraic fractions, variables in the denominator of a fraction, and mixture problems.
  • Real Numbers: Student will evaluate and simplify radical expressions and fractional exponent expressions, and solve quadratic equations by the factoring method, and by completing the square.
  • Quadratic Relations and Systems: Student will determine the major components of different conic sections, write their equations, solve and graph them.
  • Exponential Functions: Student will evaluate and simplify equations in logarithmic form, exponential form, graph them, and use matrices to solve a system of equations.
  • Counting Principles: Student will differentiate between a finite and an infinite series, and between an arithmetic and a geometric series, calculate the number of permutations or combinations of r elements from a set of n elements, and use the counting principle, conditional probability, and multiplication principle to calculate the probability of complex events.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

Algebra I Fundamentals

Algebra I Fundamentals

Algebra I Fundamentals is a full year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic concepts covered in the prerequisite course, Mathematics 800 Fundamentals. Within the Algebra I Fundamentals course, the student will explore basic algebraic fundamentals such as evaluating, creating, solving and graphinglinear, quadratic, and polynomial functions.

  • Foundations of Algebra: Student will identify different real number properties, and how to use them to solve algebraic expressions.
  • Linear Equations: Student will translate word problems into algebraic equations, and solve them using real number properties, converting between fractions, decimals, and percent’s.
  • Functions: Student will understand the characteristics of functions, how to plot them, how to derive their equations, and determine what type of function a graph represents.
  • Inequalities: Student will write, graph, and solve inequalities using real number properties.
  • Linear Systems: Student will determine the solution of a pair of linear equations, using the addition method, substitution method and matrices.
  • Polynomials: Student will add, subtract, multiply, and divide monomials and polynomials, as well as factor polynomials, using several different methods.
  • Exponential and Radical Functions: Student will simplify powers of products, a power raised to a power, and quotients of powers, using the rule of exponents, and add, subtract, multiply, and divide radical expressions to solve equations.
  • Quadratics: Student will identify, write, and graph various triangle, circle and quadratic equations and inequalities using the Pythagorean theorem, and by factoring, completing the square, and using the square root method.
  • Rational Expressions: Student will add and subtract fractions with like and unlike denominators, solve proportions, equations and inequalities containing rational expressions, and solve different word problems using rational equations.
  • Probability and Statistics: Student will determine the central tendencies of a given data set, as well as evaluate probability of possible outcomes using multiple methods.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

World Geography

World Geography

World Geography takes students on a journey around the world in which they will learn about the physical and human geography of various regions. They will study the history of each region and examine the political, economic, and cultural characteristics of the world in which you live.

Students will also learn about the tools and technologies of geography such as globes, maps, charts, and global information systems.Students will also gain practice in writing and note-taking. They will be asked to create graphic organizers, conduct research, analyze information, and write essays on topics such as current events, energy resources, and national parks.

  • Unit 1: Students will discover the five themes of geography, describe earth’s major physical features, and describe the characteristics of the world’s ecosystems.
  • Unit 2: Students will examine population growth, migration, economic systems, and sustainable development.
  • Unit 3: Students will explore the human and physical geography of North America and address the environmental concerns facing Greenland, Canada, Mexico, and the U.S.
  • Unit 4: Students will gain knowledge about the human and physical geography of Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. They will also address the environmental concerns facing these areas.
  • Unit 5: Students will describe the human and physical geography of Oceania, Australasia, and Antarctica. They will also address the environmental concerns facing these areas.•Unit 7: Students will examine the physical and human geography, environmental concerns and the major nations of Europe.
  • Unit 8: Students will learn about the physical and human geography, environmental concerns and the major nations of Eastern Europe.
  • Unit 9: Students will explore the physical and human geography, environmental concerns and the major nations of Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Unit 10: Students will describe the physical and human geography, environmental concerns and the major nations of North Africa and Southwest Asia.
  • Unit 11: Students will explain the human and physical geography of Asia. They will also address the environmental concerns facing these areas.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

History and Geography 600

History and Geography 600

History and Geography 600 focuses on World History, with an emphasis on Western Europe. Specifically, it covers World History from ancient civilizations through the end of the 20th century, highlighting the Middle Ages and the two World Wars. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Social Studies skills. 

  • Unit 1: Use maps to identify regions and explore their physical and cultural features
  • Unit 2: Describe the history and culture of ancient civilizations
  • Unit 3: Identify and compare the history, culture, and contribution of ancient Greece and Rome
  • Unit 4: Explain the history, culture, and daily life of societies in the Middle Ages
  • Unit 5: Describe geographical features, natural resources, and cultures of: Brazil, Columbia, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana
  • Unit 6: Identify and explain geographical features, natural resources, and cultures of: Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay, Paraguay, Argentina, and Chile
  • Unit 7: Describe and differentiate the geographical features and history of countries regions of Africa
  • Unit 8: Summarize the history and conflicts of Western Europe
  • Unit 9: Describe the culture and government of Eastern Europe
  • Unit 10: Review the culture, conflicts, and impact of major world regions
     

State: National
Grade Level: 6
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

U.S. History Reconstruction to Present

U.S. History Reconstruction to Present

U.S. History Reconstruction to Present examines American history from the events leading up to the Civil War to the present day, placing special emphasis on the major political, economic, and social movements of the twentieth century. Additionally, students will gain practice in research and writing through various projects. In addition to the default course program, U.S. History Reconstruction to Present includes alternate lessons, projects, essays, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

  • Unit 1: Students will explain the causes of sectionalism and compromises in the years leading up to the Civil War. Students will also identify the major battles, and the end of the Civil War. 
  • Unit 2: Students will examine the goals and outcomes of Reconstruction, the outcomes of industrialization, and the causes and effects of western expansion.•Unit 3:Students will describe the Spanish-American War and imperialism, reform movements of the Progressive Era, and the U.S. involvement in World War I.
  • Unit 4: Students will acknowledge the social, cultural, educational, and religious issues of the 1920s, recognize the causes of the Great Depression, and analyze the programs and effects of the New Deal. 
  • Unit 5: Students will identify the major causes, events, and effects of World War II, the origins of the Cold War, and U.S. efforts to contain the spread of Communism in the Korean War. 
  • Unit 6: Students will know the social, cultural, and political events of the Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson presidencies.
  • Unit 7: Students will identify major individuals during the 1960s, significant details of the civil rights and anti-war movements, and describe the effects of the Vietnam War on Americans. 
  • Unit 8: Students will examine the social, political, and economic events of the 1970s.
  • Unit 9: Students will describe the major issues and events of the Reagan and Bush presidencies.
  • Unit 10: Students will evaluate the main events, issues, and policies of the Clinton, Bush Jr., and Obama presidencies. They will also understand the key challenges facing American society in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as terrorism, conservation, government and big business, and education. 

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

U.S. History Foundations to Present

U.S. History Foundations to Present

U.S. History Foundations to Present covers early American exploration to the present day, placing special emphasis on the politics of the 18th and early 19th centuries and the Civil War. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Government and Citizenship. Additionally, students will gain practice in writing essays and reports, covering topics like the Monroe Doctrine, the states’ rights debate, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, isolationism, the New Deal, and the Korean conflict. In addition to the default course program, U.S. History Foundations to Present includes alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

  • Unit 1: Students will examine how events of the Middle Ages and Crusades led to exploration, and early attempts at colonization in America. They will identify the Puritans, Pilgrims, and the growth of colonies in America.
  • Unit 2: Students will understand how conflict between the American colonies and Great Britain led to American independence. They will also examine the development of constitutional government in the U.S. after the war. 
  • Unit 3: Students will evaluate the early years of federal government, the War of 1812, and the administration of President Monroe and President Jackson. 
  • Unit 4: Students will identify the causes, effects, and characteristics of sectionalism in the U.S.
  • Unit 5: Students will examine the differences in regions of America.
  • Unit 6: Students will explain how political, economic, and social changes in the U.S. led to the Civil War and evaluate Reconstruction.
  • Unit 7: Students will study events of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries including the Industrial Age and its effects in the U.S., the Progressive Era, isolationism, the Spanish-American War, and the causes of World War I. 
  • Unit 8: Students will examine the First World War, the search for peace, the roaring twenties, the Great Depression, and the New Deal. 
  • Unit 9: Students will identify the causes and effects of World War II and the U.S. involvement in the Cold War. 
  • Unit 10: Students will understand key people and events of contemporary America from the 1960s to 2000s.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

World History

World History

World History explores the people, events, and ideas that have shaped history from the beginnings of human society to the present day. Students will study such topics as ancient civilizations, empires, exploration, the world wars, and globalization. Students will also gain practice in research using technology and writing through various projects. In addition to the default course program, World History includes alternate lessons, projects, essays, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

  • Unit 1: Students will discover how history is studied and the methods that are used to gather information. They will identify the early humans, their characteristics, and lifestyles.
  • Unit 2: Students will know the characteristics of a civilization and identify the early river valley civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China. They will examine how those civilizations evolved, agriculture developed, and kingdoms emerged.•Unit 3:Students will describe the classical traditions, development of major religions, and the growth of giant empires by looking at the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and the Chinese.
  • Unit 4: Students will explain the reasons for the fall of early empires, examine changes in religions, and identify the effects of migration and trade on the New World.
  • Unit 5: Students will identify the emergence of the Middle Ages in Europe. They will examine the dominant religions of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, while also discovering the civilizations of Asia, Oceania, Africa, and the Americas.
  • Unit 7: Students will know the reasons for and effects of exploration and colonization by European countries. They will examine the history of imperialism, the Renaissance, the Inquisition, and the Reformation. 
  • Unit 8: Students will evaluate the many revolutions and conflicts that took place from 1750-1914 in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. They will also identify the characteristics of the Industrial Revolution and European Imperialism in Asia and Africa. 
  • Unit 9: Students will compare and contrast the causes and results of the World Wars. They will also gain knowledge on the Boer War and the Russian and Chinese Revolutions. 
  • Unit 10: Students will understand the major events of the Cold War. They will also examine the effects of World War II including independence movements and globalization. 
  • Unit 11: Students will describe the major issues affecting nations today, including globalization, population growth, pandemics, and immigration. They will also examine types of economic systems and the history of capitalism.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

Government

Government

The Government course focuses on American and international governments. Students will learn about the history of governments, the characteristics of the United States government, political parties, and the voting process. These areas of focus target two major content strands: History, and Government and Citizenship. Students will also gain practice in research, presentations, writing essays, and creating an argument in topics such as elected officials and the Supreme Court. In addition to the default course program, Government includes alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

  • International Governments: Students will learn the basic philosophies and types of government while exploring historical political leaders from around the world. 
  • History of Governments: Students explore the different governments throughout history including ancient Greek democracy, feudalism, and totalitarian regimes.

American Government:Examine the structure and functions of the U.S. government including the Constitution, branches of government, and how a bill becomes a law. Understand the effects technology and the economy have on the American government.

U.S. Party System:Understand the development and role of political parties in the American party system. Students will look at the effect media and the public have on the political process. 

The Citizen:Describe the role of the citizen in the United States government. Identify methods of propaganda and how they are used to effect public opinion.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester

History and Geography 800

History and Geography 800

History and Geography 800 focuses on American History, covering the subject from early exploration through the present day, with special emphasis given to the Civil War and to inventions and technology of the 19th and early 20th centuries. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Government and Citizenship. Additionally, students will gain practice in research and writing, covering topics like explorers, the thirteen colonies, famous battles, the U.S. Constitution, western expansion, the Civil War, the Industrial Revolution, propaganda, citizenship, and inventors. In addition to the default course program, History and Geography 800 includes alternate lessons, projects, and tests, for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

  • Unit 1: Students will examine major events of the Age of Exploration by identifying the accomplishments of significant explorers. Students will also look at how exploration affected major European countries in trade and power.
  • Unit 2: Students will identify how the American colonies were established by European countries and the influence they had on the characteristics of each colony; this laid the foundation for cultural differences in each area.
  • Unit 3: Students will understand the conflicts that arose between the American colonies and Great Britain and how they led to the American Revolution. Students will also examine the war including battles, turning points, and the outcome.
  • Unit 4: Students will evaluate the origins of U.S. government during the American Revolution, the attempt at colonial government under the Articles of Confederation, and the establishment of the current U.S. government through the Constitutional Convention. 
  • Unit 5: Understand political, economic, and social changes that occurred in the United States during the 19th century. These include changes from the Industrial Revolution, movement into the western frontier, and sectionalism in the U.S.
  • Unit 6: Student will describe the causes, events, and aftermath of the Civil War.
  • Unit 7: Students will identify the Industrial Revolution in Europe and the U.S. prior to the Civil War and examine how it continued to develop after the war with the growth of inventions, corporations, and labor unions. 
  • Unit 8: Students will evaluate U.S. expansion and imperialism during the twentieth century with the Spanish American War. They will describe the causes and effects of World War I, including the Great Depression.
  • Unit 9: Students will examine World War II and the events after including the Cold War, Korean War, Vietnam, and the presidencies from Nixon through Clinton. The will finish the unit by understanding some of the key challenges facing American society in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. 

State: National
Grade Level: 8
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

World Civilizations

World Civilizations

World Civilizations examines the growth of human society from our earliest beginnings to the present. Students will study such topics as agricultural societies, ancient civilizations, empires, trade, and migration. Students will also gain practice in researching, using technology, and writing through various projects. In addition to the default course program, World Civilization includes alternate lessons, projects, essays, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

  • Unit 1: Students will discover how history is studied and the methods that are used to gather information. They will identify the early humans, their characteristics, and their lifestyles.
  • Unit 2: Students will examine rise of early civilizations and their characteristics and identify the Indo-European invaders and their effects while evaluating the advances in weapons and tools.
  • Unit 3: Students will describe the classical tradition, the development of major religions, and the giant empires with a focus on Greek and Roman societies.
  • Unit 3: Students will describe the fall of the empires and the emergence of the Middle Ages in Europe. They will examine the dominant religions of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, while also discovering the civilizations of Asia, Oceania, Africa, and the Americas. 
  • Unit 5: Students will examine the civilizations and dynasties of Asia, Europe, Africa, the Americas from approximately 1000 A.D. to 1500 A.D.
  • Unit 6: Students will identify the significant discoveries of the Age of Exploration, the colonization of the New World, the impacts of Europeans going eastward, the Renaissance, and the Scientific Revolution.
  • Unit 7: Students will evaluate the many revolutions and conflicts that took place from 1750-1914 in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. 
  • Unit 8: Students will examine various military conflicts including World War I, the Russian Revolution, the Great Depression, the road to World War II, the independence movements in Asia and Africa, and the Chinese Revolution. 
  • Unit 9: Students will identify important events of the Cold War, describe the relationship between the United States and Soviet Union, identify apartheid in South Africa, examine the Israeli-Palestine conflict, identify the growth of terrorism, and evaluate globalization. 
  • Unit 10: Students will examine long term changes and recurring patterns in history and compare and contrast different economic systems.

State: National
Grade Level: 7, 8
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year