At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the Rhode Island Grade Level, Rhode Island NGSS Arranged by Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI) and Grade Span Expectations and the Rhode Island Common Core Standards.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

French II

French II

French II is a high school foreign language course that builds on and reviews skills and concepts taught in French I through further exposure to communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency. In addition to the default course program, French II includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

This course gives students practice using the mechanics of the French language, acquaints them with the cultural differences of francophone countries, and helps them gain a keen awareness of their own culture.

  • Unit 1: Students will explore how to shop in France through vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation of products, markets, and bakeries.
  • Unit 2: Students will examine different professions and trades through vocab, grammar, and pronunciation.
  • Unit 3: Students will learn cultural information, vocabulary, and grammar relating to French films.
  • Unit 4: Students will learn vocabulary and grammar related to living in the city, the countryside, and traveling by train. They will also learn how to conjugate a list of past tense verbs.
  • Unit 5: Students will examine all topics of health and illness by using vocab, grammar, and pronunciation.
  • Unit 7: Students will study the vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation relating to travel and visiting Quebec.
  • Unit 8: Students will study all about the influences that have affected clothing through the last 100 years while using grammar and pronunciation.
  • Unit 9: Students will learn about art-related vocabulary, historical and cultural connections to art, France's influence on the art of other cultures, as well as some new grammatical elements.
  • Unit 10: Students will explore an overview of three francophone regions: Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, Guadeloupe, in the Caribbean Sea, and French Polynesia, in the South Pacific. They will learn pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary associated with these regions and travel.
  • Unit 11: Students will discover life events that francophone cultures consider significant. They will then review these events and the grammatical structures that enable people to talk about them.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: World Languages
Course Length: Year

French I

French I

In French 1, students begin to develop competence in four basic skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Whiledeveloping communicative competence in French, students gain and expand their knowledge of francophone countries and cultures. In addition to the default course program, French I include extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

Emphasis is placed on learning the present tense, the near future and the past tense in French I through thematically designed units. Topics include home, school, family, holidays, and daily and leisure activities.

  • Unit 1: Students will be introduced to French by learning greetings, the alphabet, numbers, how French has been influenced by other cultures, and how nouns are affected by gender.
  • Unit 2: Students will learn school-related vocabulary words and classroom expressions, the days of the week, months, and time. They will also learn how to conjugate certain verbs.
  • Unit 3: Students will study the French names for family members and possessive adjectives. They will then learn how to describe someone’s hair and eye color and ask questions for information in French.
  • Unit 4: Students will explore the sports and activities of France, the verbs and adverbs of those activities as well as the temperature and seasons in French.
  • Unit 5: Students will learn about colors and expressions, holidays celebrated, stem-changing verbs, and direct-object nouns and pronouns.
  • Unit 7: Students will identify modes of transportation and buildings, use prepositions of place, and conjugate regular and irregular “-re verbs”.
  • Unit 8: Students will learn words that pertain to food and beverages, analyze French cuisine and regional dishes, and use partitive articles and expressions of quantity.
  • Unit 9: Students will identify words pertaining to clothes and parts of the body, gestures and expressions. They will also conjugate reflexive verbs and explain routines in France.
  • Unit 10: Students will examine words pertaining to computers, the Internet, and television. They will also identify direct and indirect objects and replace them with direct and indirect pronouns.
  • Unit 11: Students will learn vocabulary words related to travel, the beach, and trains. They will also examine grammar and words relating to French customs about vacations.

Students develop the ability to:

  • greet and respond to greetings
  • introduce and respond to introductions
  • engage in conversations on several themes
  • express likes and dislikes
  • make requests
  • obtain information
  • understand some ideas and familiar details
  • begin to provide information

By the end of French I, students will:

  • communicate minimally by using short sentences, learned words and phrases, and simple questions and commands when speaking and writing.
  • understand some ideas and familiar details presented in clear, uncomplicated speech when listening.
  • understand short texts enhanced by visual clues when reading. 

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: World Languages
Course Length: Year

Vietnam Era

Vietnam Era

What comes to mind when you think about the Vietnam Era? For many, that period represents a difficult time in U.S. history. It is defined by an unpopular war that claimed the lives of 58,000 Americans and some 3 million Vietnamese. In this course, you'll look at the history of the Vietnam War. The roots of the conflict stretch further back than you might know. You'll examine why the United States got involved in the conflict and why the United States failed to achieve its objectives.

  • Unit 1: Students will learn about the history of Vietnam before the war and explain why the United States got involved in Vietnam.
  • Unit 2: Students will study the growth of U.S. involvement in Vietnam following the 1954 Geneva Accords to the first American combat troops in 1965 after the Gulf of Tonkin incident.
  • Unit 3: Students will describe fighting techniques and efforts by both the Vietnamese and Americans as well as the U.S. public opinion about the war.
  • Unit 4: Students will explore the Tet Offensive, Vietnamization, and the end of the war.
  • Unit 5: Students will identify the outcome of the Vietnam War, examine the 1973 Paris Peace Accords, and explain the impact of the Vietnam War on American foreign policy.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester

Twentieth Century American History

Twentieth Century American History

Twentieth Century American History is a history elective for high school students interested in examining American history during a century of change, continuity, and conflicts.

Students will examine America's economic, political, governmental, cultural, and technological growing pains during the twentieth century. They will also consider the causes and effects of national and international cooperation, competition, andconflict.

In attaining these goals, students will develop insight and perspective on the themes and patterns of history and a greater understanding of today's world.

  • Unit 1: Students will examine the major economic, political, and social changes of the 1800s including: The Industrial Revolution, urbanization, and immigration.
  • Unit 2: Students will explore the effects of the late 1800s by looking at all aspects of Progressivism.
  • Unit 3: Students will study issues that occurred after World War I, including the Russian Revolution, the Red Scare, and the three presidents following Woodrow Wilson.
  • Unit 4: Students will obtain knowledge on World War II, the Cold War, Eisenhower, and post-war American society.
  • Unit 5: Students will identify the Civil Rights Movement, the rise of conservatism, post-Cold War foreign policy, and the economic and social issues facing contemporary America.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester

Personal Financial Literacy

Personal Financial Literacy

Personal Financial Literacy is a semester-length elective designed to help high school students prepare for success in making financial decisions throughout their lives. Topics in the course address the advantages of making sound financial decisions in both the short and long term, income planning, money management, saving and investing, and consumer rights and responsibilities.

  • Financial Responsibility and Decision-making: This unit helps students gain knowledge about money and what they can do with money. Students will learn that it's important to become financially literate, so they can make smart financial decisions about sales and purchases, credit, investments and budgets.
  • Careers and Income: This unit introduces students to information about careers, concepts to know before starting a business, sources of income, and paying income taxes.
  • Money Management: Budgets and spending as well as financial institutions and the tools they offer are the focus of this unit. Students will also learn about financial risks and strategies to manage them.
  • Saving and Investing: Students will learn about the benefits of opening a saving account, types of interest, investing, and financial planning and the elements a plan should include.
  • Credit, Debt, and Consumer Skills: This unit discusses credit, loans, and consumer rights. Students will learn about credit cards and the costs and hazards of using them. Loans and mortgages will also be reviewed as will consumer rights and protections.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester

Physical Fitness

Physical Fitness

Physical Fitness is a semester-length elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on the health benefits of regular physical activity and of a long-term exercise program. As students work through the course, they will learn about the many aspects of physical fitness, including basic nutrition, the importance of flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscle and strength training, and realistic goal setting. Along the way, students will be required to maintain and submit an activity log in order to measure progress in course exercises, as well as in personal fitness goals.

Upon completion of Physical Fitness, students should possess the knowledge and skills needed to do the following:

  • Analyze the key components of successful physical activity and use this analysis to determine if a program is reasonable and effective.
  • Describe the three main types of physical activity that should be included in a exercise regime and the health benefits of each.
  • Perform basic fitness exercises associated with the three main types of physical activity discussed in this course.
  • Identify the main motivational strategies that can be used to help the student continue in positive fitness habits once this course is completed

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education is a semester-long elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on performance of individual and team sports, with explanations of proper technique, rules of the game, and preparation. Team sports introducedinclude soccer, basketball, football, baseball, and volleyball. An introduction to fitness, strength, endurance, and nutrition is also included.

Students will have the opportunity to perform each sport on their own time, while keeping a log of activity. The goal is in corporation of activity into their daily lives and the gain of lifelong healthy fitness habits. Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notesare not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

Upon completion of Physical Education, students should possess the knowledge and skills needed to do the following:

  • Define physical fitness and describe the components of being physically fit
  • Evaluate their fitness level
  • Apply physical fitness, nutrition-related, and weight-management skills to their lives
  • Understand and apply safe exercise rules
  • Describe the history and rules of sports such as basketball, baseball, football, soccer, volleyball, and gymnastics
  • Describe and apply skills needed for a variety of sports

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Personal and Family Living

Personal and Family Living

This semester-long high school elective takes students on an interactive exploration of the challenges they may face as they transition into adulthood, including constructive conflict resolution, nutrition and health, building healthy families, financial responsibility, and long-term employment.

Objectives

  • Examine specific principles that will help develop their personal lives.
  • Learn about proper nutrition and demonstrate skill in preparing various food items.
  • Prepare weekly and monthly budgets.
  • Develop strategies for an employment search.
  • Explore work and careers and how different interests, abilities and personalities influence employment decisions.
  • Develop an understanding of relational dynamics with family members, friends, classmates, co-workers, and those encountered in the marketplace.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Health Education

Health Education

Health Education is a health science elective course that introduces students to what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do to achieve good health.

  • Body Essentials: This unit introduces the different systems in the human body, showing how the body develops.
  • Physical Health: This unit demonstrates to students how they may develop good practices as they promote proper physical health.
  • Social and Mental Health: This unit teaches how to establish strong social and mental health though true health wisdom.
  • Preventive Healthcare and First Aid: This unit focuses instruction on safety, emergency care, and disease prevention.
  • Responsible Living: This unit discusses how students may apply the principles of good stewardship, covering topics like pollution, drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Health Quest

Health Quest

Health Quest is a health science elective course for upper elementary and junior high students. The curriculum introduces students to the concepts of what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do to achieve good health.

  • Your Body: This unit introduces the different systems in the human body, showing how the body develops from birth through childhood, during adolescence, and in adulthood.
  • Health: This unit demonstrates to students how they may develop good practices as they promote proper mental, emotional, physical, and social health.
  • Nutrition and Fitness: This unit teaches how to establish healthy eating practices and proper fitness routines.
  • Health Maintenance: This unit focuses on safety, emergency care, and disease prevention.
  • Responsible Living: This unit discusses how students may apply the principles of responsible living, covering topics such as pollution, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy.

State: National
Grade Level: 7, 8
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester