At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the Ohio Learning Standards.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

English II

English II

Students will gain valuable cultural insight as they read and write about works depicting the social, personal, religious, and political struggles and triumphs faced by people all over the world and all through history. Students will continue to build their literacy skills by engaging in active reading, composition, speaking and listening activities, vocabulary study, and focused research projects. To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will continue to develop their understanding of effective communication, as well as gain a broader perspective of literature. 

  • Unit 1: Coming of Age: Students will examine works that reflect the universal theme of crossing the threshold into maturity, analyzing literary elements such as theme, motif, rhetoric, and archetypes, as well as the impact of author background and culture. 
  • Unit 2: The Struggle Against Injustice:Students will complete an analytical reading ofAnimal Farm, evaluating the powerful political message of the text, and the way the author utilizes methods such as characterization and allegory to communicate his purpose.
  • Unit 3: Fighting for Freedom:Students will read works that have been selected because they represent the struggle for freedom, covering different countries, cultures, centuries and genders, and will be introduced to the power of literary, religious, and philosophical traditions that influenced writer from other cultures. 
  • Unit 5: Perspectives in World Literature:Students will examine literature that offers a wide world perspective, includingNectar in a Sieve, varied poetry, and work by Gandhi; students will apply their analysis skills to explore elements such as themes, narrative structure, symbolism, and context, utilizing writing skills to compose well-structured arguments.
  • Unit 6: Cultural Context of Writing:Using culture as a context, students will focus on utilizing inference skills to analyze theme and author purpose, composing several written works that require reading comprehension, well-developed literary analysis, and strong research skills.
  • Unit 7: Things Fall Apart: Students will incorporate research and historical/cultural context in their exploration of the post-colonial South African novel,Things Fall Apart, progressing into an analysis of the rhetoric and logical of politically-charged literature and speeches of South Africa.
  • Unit 8: Tradition vs. Change:Students will encounter works that illuminate the theme of the conflict between tradition and change, focusing heavily on project-based work, including a speaking and listening project and an advanced research project that requires students to employ such skills as paraphrasing, proper citations, and determining credible research sources. 

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English I

English I

Students engage in in-depth analysis of increasingly more complex literature, view that literature from its historical perspective, and connect it to other arts. They will write literary analyses, logical arguments, informational/explanatory texts, narratives, and focused research projects. These writing tasks will be both formal and informal. Additionally, they will engage in speaking and listening activities that use and incorporate media and technology. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will grow their vocabulary and their understanding of how to communicate effectively by making skillful choices when expressing themselves with language.

  • Unit 1: Short Story:Students will gain a deeper understanding of common literary elements, evaluate narrator reliability, point of view, and characterization through research, writing, and an exchange of ideas in group discussions.
  • Unit 2: Literary Nonfiction:Students will read a variety of nonfiction forms, including autobiography, memoir, essay, and speech.
  • Unit 3: Epic Poetry:Students examine the question of what makes a hero through reading Homer’s Greek epicThe Odyssey, research, and creation of an argumentative essay.
  • Unit 5: Drama:Students will be introduced to ancient Greek and Elizabethan English drama, and compare and contrast the original Romeo and Juliet with a modern adaptation.
  • Unit 6: Novel:Students will explore unifying themes as they readTo Kill a Mockingbird. A study of various speeches illuminates the historical context of the novel.
  • Unit 7: Poetry:Students will examine poetic form, study poems from different eras and different cultures, as well.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English III Fundamentals

English III Fundamentals

Students will continue to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will strengthen an increasingly advanced understanding of the structure of language and grammar, and use this knowledge to write literary analyses, professional career documents, poetry, advanced essays, and a focused research project. In addition, students will read and comprehend a variety of literature, including drama, literary fiction, poetry, and foundational American documents. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will grow their vocabulary and their understanding of how to communicate effectively bymaking skillful choices when expressing themselves with language. 

  • Unit 1: The Uses and Varieties of English:Students will complete an in-depth study of the nuances of the English language, including standard and nonstandard English, professional language, colloquialisms, and legal and business English, utilizing both this knowledge and reference tools to complete projects involving topics such as language analysis and etymology. 
  • Unit 2: Writing Effective Sentences:Students will advance their understanding of the parts of speech, correctly recognizing the purpose and use of various types of clauses, conjunctions, and verbal’s. 
  • Unit 3: Sentence Workshop:Students will understand the relationships among sentence parts in the English language, working with elements such as pronouns, adverbs, infinitives, and parallelism to improve sentence structure.
  • Unit 4: Why Study Reading?Students will dissect specific elements of the English language with the purpose of advancing their reading comprehension skills; these elements include Latin and Green prefixes and roots, pronunciation, and context clues. 
  • Unit 5: Poetry:Students will analyze poetic meter, rhyme, and form, as well as poetic elements such as imagery and connotation in a variety of poetry, demonstrating mastery of the content through the composition of original poetry, poetic analyses, and a prose paraphrase of a classic poem. 
  • Unit 7: Nonfiction:Students will examine the elements of nonfiction, looking closely at expository works such as essays, speeches, magazine and newspaper articles, and editorials; students will create their own expository texts, including developing a survey and graphing the results.
  • Unit 8: American Drama:Students will complete an analytical reading of Thornton Wilder’s play,Our Town, interpreting the elements of drama such as stage devices, structure, theme, conflict, and character. 
  • Unit 9: Studies in the American Novel:Students will examine the history and structure of the American novel, using a critical lens to read, interpret, and analyze Ernest Hemingway’sThe Old Man and the Sea.
  • Unit 10: Research:Students will build mastery in the skills required for academic research, including the utilization of various reference sources, documentation, citation; culminating in the development of an outline, thesis, and final research project.
  • Unit 11: Reviewing Communication Skills and Literature:Students will review the major skills mastered in the course, including effective reading and writing, as well as the process of composing advanced academic texts, such as research projects, expository essays, and critical analyses.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English II Fundamentals

English II Fundamentals

Students will continue to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will strengthen an increasingly advanced understanding of the structure of language and grammar, and use this knowledge to write literary analyses, professional career documents, poetry, a short story, and an original speech. In addition, students will read and comprehend a variety of literature, including short stories, drama, and expository text. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will grow their vocabulary and their understanding of how to communicate effectively by making skillful choices when expressing themselves with language.

  • Unit 1: Reading, Writing, and Speaking: Students strengthen their understanding of the basic parts and structure of language, including vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and etymology; in addition, students review strategies for active listening.
  • Unit 2: Language Structure: Students will understand the purpose and use of increasingly advanced parts of speech, including noun plurals, suffixes, pronouns/antecedents, and clauses.
  • Unit 3: Writing Effective Strategies: Students will understand and utilize the key parts of a sentence, including participles, gerunds, and a variety of phrases.
  • Unit 4: Exposition: Students will refine their reading skills, including distinguishing the main idea of a text, understanding relationships between ideas, and interpreting varieties of English (including dialect and colloquial speech); students will then utilize this knowledge in the composition of focused, well-written essays and speeches.
  • Unit 5: Get a Job: Students will reinforce an understanding of increasingly advanced grammar and punctuation, and will master the writing of professional documents, such as resumes and cover letters.
  • Unit 7: Media and You: Students will refine their interpretation of various forms of media, learning to analyze the purpose, audience, occasion, subject, and potential bias of a variety of media.
  • Unit 8: Short Stories: Students will read and analyze short stories, completing literary analyses and composing their own, original short stories using the literary techniques and elements taught in the unit. 
  • Unit 9: Reviewing Literature: Students will continue to advance their literary analysis skills, delving into elements such as character, symbolism, and mood with a critical eye and utilizing writing skills to compose a full literary analysis essay of Silas Marner.
  • Unit 10: Poetry: Students will read and analyze poetry, including poetic elements such as form, rhyme, meter, diction, and symbolism; students will write a poem analysis as well as compose an original poem to demonstrate their understanding.
  • Unit 11: Pygmalion: Students will read George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion, interpreting and analyzing characters, events, and themes, culminating in an advanced literary analysis essay examining theme in the literature.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English I Fundamentals

English I Fundamentals

Students engage in in-depth analysis of increasingly more complex literature, view that literature from its historical perspective, and connect it to other arts. They will write literary analyses, logical arguments, informational/explanatory texts, narratives, and focused research projects. These writing tasks will be both formal and informal. Additionally, they will engage in speaking and listening activities that use and incorporate media and technology. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will grow their vocabulary and their understanding of how to communicate effectively by making skillful choices when expressing themselves with language.

  • Unit 1: Short Story:Students will gain a deeper understanding of common literary elements, evaluate narrator reliability, point of view, and characterization through research, writing, and an exchange of ideas in group discussions.
  • Unit 2: Literary Nonfiction:Students will read a variety of nonfiction forms, including autobiography, memoir, essay, and speech.
  • Unit 3: Epic Poetry:Students examine the question of what makes a hero through reading Homer’s Greek epicThe Odyssey, research, and creation of an argumentative essay.
  • Unit 5: Drama:Students will be introduced to ancient Greek and Elizabethan English drama, and compare and contrast the original Romeo and Juliet with a modern adaptation.
  • Unit 6: Novel:Students will explore unifying themes as they readTo Kill a Mockingbird. A study of various speeches illuminates the historical context of the novel.
  • Unit 7: Poetry:Students will examine poetic form, study poems from different eras and different cultures, as well.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

Security and Protective Services

Security and Protective Services

This course offers an overview of the security and protective services industry. Students will understand different types of security services and how they relate to one another. They will also understand the distinction between the criminal justice system within the public sector and private security. The course begins with an introduction to the history of private security, with subsequent units focusing on a specific sector. The concluding unit focuses on the emerging challenges facing security services in the twenty-first century, including international terrorism. In addition, the course will provide information about many different careers that are available to students who are interested in security and protective services.

  • Private Security Career Paths, their History and Legal Development of Security Services: This unit focuses on the history of security services, how the industry has advanced, and the legal aspects associated with it.
  • Physical Security Services: This unit explores the day-to-day operations in security services, including loss prevention, private investigation, and corporate espionage.
  • Interactions with the Public and Communications: This unit focuses on communicating effectively with the public as part of the criminal justice and security industry sectors.
  • Security Operations: This unit focuses on a broad range of methods for conducting security and safety operations and how they are integrated for best management practices.
  • Security in the 21st Century: This unit focuses on the emerging challenges facing private security in the twenty-first century and the implications for local, national, and international security efforts.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Legal Services

Legal Services

The Legal Services course will provide students with an overview of the system of laws in the United States and the practice areas and career options in the field. Students will learn about how the legal system operates to control how society punishes those who commit crimes and settles disputes, as well as how criminal and civil cases reach court and are resolved. They will learn about the courtroom and the basics of a typical court case. Students will learn about constitutional rights and legal safeguards, as well as how technology has changed the practice of law. They will also learn about legal education and careers in law for attorneys and non-attorneys with an interest in the field.

  • The Law: Origins and Structure: This unit focuses on the origins of law in the United States and the structure of the U.S. legal system, so students understand the basis of the current legal structure.
  • The Courtroom and the Case: This unit explores the people and procedures involved in legal cases.
  • Contemporary Law Topics: This unit focuses on two areas of law relevant today—civil rights and the use of technology in law enforcement and throughout the legal system.
  • Evidence and Forensics: This unit focuses on the concepts of evidence and testimony—two ways that parties in a lawsuit provide proof for their side of the case.
  • Post-secondary Legal Education and Careers in the Legal Field: This unit focuses on legal education and careers in the legal field.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Law Enforcement Field Services

Law Enforcement Field Services

Law Enforcement Field Services Course OverviewThe Introduction to Law Enforcement Services course will introduce students to the field of law enforcement and the local, county, state, and federal laws that law enforcement personnel are sworn to uphold. The student will also gain an understanding of the career options available in this field and the skills, education, and background experience needed to succeed in these careers. Students will learn about the evolution of the role of law enforcement in the United States and the interplay between individual freedoms and the government’s need to protect the country. They will also learn about key changes affecting law enforcement following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, including the creation of new laws, the restructuring of many departments within the federal government, and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security. Students will learn about the interaction between local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. The lessons will emphasize the importance of interagency communication and information sharing. Students will learn about the technological advances and new federal programs that aid cooperation between agencies. Students will also learn about the types of crime that are commonly committed and the procedures, evidence collection techniques, and technological advances that law enforcement personnel use to investigate them. Students will learn how the development of computers and the Internet has changed the way many crimes are committed. They will also learn how investigators address the resulting increased globalization of criminal activity.

  • A Tradition of Safe Communities: This unit focuses on the history of law enforcement in the United States and the differences between the responsibilities of local, country, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.•Local and State Law Enforcement: This unit explores the background requirements needed for a career in local, county, and state law enforcement and the training options available for various positions. It also investigates the daily responsibilities of local, county, and state law enforcement officers and their role in disaster situations.
  • Federal Law Enforcement: This unit describes the history and scope of the authority of federal law enforcement agencies. It also examines the role of various federal agencies and the similarities and differences between civilian and military investigative agencies.
  • Crime and Criminals: This unit explores the distinction between crimes against an individual, crimes against property, and crimes against a community. It also investigates the relationship between constitutionally guaranteed freedoms and the government’s need to protect the community.
  • 21st Century Policing: In this unit, students learn about the technological advances that have revolutionized how law enforcement agents enforce laws, investigate crimes, and protect the public. It also explores the educational requirements for a career in law enforcement and the additional training required to work in specialized areas. 

For the topics and assignments in this course, it will be helpful for the student to have a general understanding of the structure of the federal government and the relationship between local, county, state, and federal governments. He or she should have the ability to communicate thoughts in written and oral form and be able to use factual data to defend an opinion. It will also be useful for the student to be familiar with conducting online research and be able to evaluate the credibility of online sources. If a student is not comfortable assessing the credibility of online sources, information on this topic can be found on a variety of educational websites, including:

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security

Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security

Life in the twenty-first century would not be possible without police officers, paramedics, firefighters, attorneys, corrections officers or security guards. In this course, students will learn about the many careers that exist within the fields of law, law enforcement, public safety, corrections, and security. Besides learning about the training and educational requirements for these careers, students will explore the history of these fields and how they developed to their current state. Students will also learn how these careers are affected by and affect local, state, and federal laws. Finally, students will examine the relationships between professionals in these fields and how collaborations between professionals in these careers help to create a safer, more stable society.

  • Law Enforcement Career Paths, their History and their Role in Society: This unit focuses on law enforcement careers, the history of law enforcement in the United States and the role that law enforcement plays in society.
  • Careers in Corrections: This unit explores careers in the corrections fields, including the history of prisons and jails and the nature of probation and parole in the correction fields.
  • American Criminal Law and Legal Services: This unit focuses on American criminal law and legal services, including historical aspects of this field and current career opportunities.
  • Public Safety Services: This unit focuses on public safety services, including firefighters and emergency medical services (EMS) and the history of those fields.
  • Private Security Career Paths, their History and Legal Development of Security Services: This unit focuses on the private security field, including the development of this field, the laws that pertain to it and the careers that are available in this field.

For this course, students should know that:

  • there are many available careers in the law enforcement, public safety, corrections, and security fields.
  • these careers have diverse career paths that combine educational and physical requirements with high standards for training.
  • these careers are directly impacted by local, state, and federal laws

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Fire and Emergency Services

Fire and Emergency Services

Emergency and fire-management services are essential infrastructure components of a community. They provide a resource for dealing with numerous types of emergencies, including fires, motor vehicle, and industrial accidents, and medical emergencies. In addition, these services provide fire prevention and community-outreach programs. This course provides students with the basic structure of these organizations as well as the rules and guidelines that govern pre-employment education requirements. The vehicles, equipment, and emergency-mitigations strategies that are commonly used in the emergency- and fire-management field are also explored. Students will understand the goals of an emergency-management service and how they are implemented and managed, including personnel, budget, and labor-management challenges in the organization. Finally, the course also provides students with an overview of large-scale emergency incidents that overwhelm local agencies. Various preparedness plans are discussed. In the end, students will have been exposed to the typical characteristics and framework ofmodern emergency- and fire-management organizations and will have a better understanding of a career in this field.

  • Modern Emergency and Fire Management Services: This unit discusses the organizational structure of modern emergency medical and fire service systems. It also explains educational requirements for many states for firefighters, EMT, and paramedic positions, and describes common state and local laws that govern emergency-management educational requirements. Additionally, personal characteristics and requirements beyond education were explored.
  • Tools of the Trade: This unit explores the various types of apparatuses used by fire departments in the United States and explains how emergency workers can predict which equipment will be most appropriate in a disaster scenario. The unit also shows how to identify target hazards in a community and how to determine the appropriate special-operations apparatus for a given scenario. Finally, the unit explains how to predict what regulations are required for protection in specialized locations.
  • Emergency and Fire Management Skills in Action: This unit describes the main goals of an emergency and fire management department at the scene of an emergency by explaining the steps in a command sequence and the required results of the steps. This unit also explains how an incident manager chooses which apparatuses are deployed to accomplish various missions. Finally, this unit explores the historical changes that have occurred in fire departments in the United States, specifically focusing on the changes in apparatuses over the years.
  • Organizing and Managing an Emergency and Fire Management System: This unit focuses on how communities are shifting their expectations with respect to fire-personnel roles. It also examines the workforce-diversity changes that have affected emergency-management departments, and challenges and benefits associated with these changes. Finally, it shows how a local government may impact the operations of an emergency agency through funding, and how workers sometimes respond by demanding collective bargaining.
  • Advanced Situations for Emergency and Fire Management Operations: In this unit, students discover different types of disasters, their trends, and their consequences on communities, as well as the risks factors and steps that can minimize these risks. The unit also explains the various levels and components of a disaster-management plan with examples of what a mutual-aid agreement would provide an emergency-management agency to show how this would assist incident mitigation. This unit also builds upon previously learned concepts of demographic changes by investigating the potentials for mass-casualty incidents, especially related to the mass transit of people and cargo.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester