At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the Ohio Learning Standards.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Introduction to Careers in the Health Sciences

Introduction to Careers in the Health Sciences

This course is an overview of health careers and overriding principles central to all health professions. The course provides a foundation for further study in the field of health science. When students complete the course, they will be able to discuss the potential career choices and have an understanding of basic concepts that apply to these different choices.

  • Unit 1: Science and Technology in Human Health: Many current practices can be traced to ancient ideas. During ancient times, religion and culture were very important factors in determining who could become a physician and in how the physicians and healers diagnosed and treated disease. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, in medicine, there was a shift away from a focus on religion and culture to a more scientific approach. As a result, autopsies were performed, which changed the understanding of anatomy and disease. The shift to a scientific approach also helped physicians and scientists develop new procedures, treatments, and tools. The rise to modern medicine was facilitated by the introduction of technology and the ability to share resources. After the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, there were some important discoveries. Watson and Crick were credited with discovering the structure of DNA. With today’s technology and this knowledge, we are able to diagnose and treat genetic disorders and diseases. Advances in technology created opportunities for new forms of diagnostic techniques; new advances include the CT, MRI, Ultrasound, and PET Scanners. Organ transplant has been made possible by technological advances.
  • Unit 2: Anatomy and Physiology in Health and Disease: Cells are the building blocks of all living things. Cells work together to build tissues. There are four types of tissue in the human body that work together to build organs: epithelial, nervous, muscular, and connective tissue. Organs work together to form systems. The systems work together to make up a human. Each system has a specific function, but all the systems are critical. Cancer, diabetes, and tuberculosis as representative diseases were discussed. Cancer is an abnormal growth in the body. The symptoms of cancer will vary depending on the type of cancer that is present. Cancer treatment will vary but can include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and in some cases, biological therapy. Diabetes is a chronic disease resulting in abnormal blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or the cells stop responding to insulin. Type I diabetes occurs more often in childhood or adolescence; type II diabetes is more common and tends to present itself later in life than type I. Gestational diabetes only occurs during pregnancy. Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is the second largest single agent killer worldwide; the first is HIV/AIDS. About one third of the Earth’s population is infected with TB defining TB as a global pandemic. Smoking and HIV/AIDS increase your risk for contracting TB. When TB is not active, an individual may have no symptoms, but an individual with an active pulmonary TB infection will experience fever, cough, fatigue, night sweats, and weight loss. The treatment for TB is antibiotic therapy.
  • Unit 3: Privacy Ethics, and Safety: The Patient’s Bill of Rights bill of rights was written to standardize high quality care and protect the rights of the patient. The US Federal Government has included this bill of rights in health care law. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), restricts access to patient information and provides guidelines for insurance coverage. HIPAA is an important law that helps prevent discrimination based on health status and requires health care providers and institutions adopt operating procedures that protect the patient. Ethics are a personal moral code, but often, professional associations or groups of individuals with a common focus develop a code of ethics that as a group they agree to abide by. Any breech of this code could result in penalties. OSHA is the occupational safety and health organization established as a result of the Occupational Health and Safety Act passed by Congress in 1970. This act outlines rules and regulations relating to safety procedures and requirements, limits on chemical exposure in the work place, information privacy and employee access to information, requirements for the use of personal protective equipment, and requirements for hazard communication.
  • Unit 4: Communication and Teamwork in the Health Care Environment: Communication and teamwork is imperative in the health care environment. While many organizations followed or may still follow a hierarchal structure, the hierarchal structure in healthcare is beginning put aside and health care teams are being formed. Health care teams use an interdisciplinary approach to patient care, shifting the focus from long-term care to prevention of adverse outcomes. Each team member has a different level of training and expertise and plays a different role in patient care. Health care teams bring together all the different roles and perspectives to build patient centered teams. Effective communication is critical for health care teams. Communication can be written, verbal, and non-verbal. Appearance, attitude and cultural norms are a part of non-verbal communication. It is important for team members to be aware of and embrace cultural differences. Privacy issues are critical when multiple individuals are interacting with patients, their families, and patient records. Professionalism is key in the success and effectiveness of the health care team and includes all aspects of behavior, appearance, and communication.
  • Unit 5: Health Careers: Creating a Diverse Workforce Rapid advances in science and technology have changed the field of medicine, research, and other health sciences. If you decide to pursue a career in health science, math and science courses, as well as a college degree and perhaps an advanced degree will be required. You may be required to become licensed or earn a certification to practice in the field you have chosen. Be sure to understand the requirements of any career you choose. With rapid advances and changes in both medicine and technology, continuing education is increasingly important to keep individuals up-to-date with advances in their field. New discoveries, research, and inventions can also create new career paths. The goal of continuing education is to teach health science personnel new or recent advances in the field and may come in the form of books, videos, conferences, college classes, or online activities. Professional organizations or associations are also important in providing ongoing information and education to their members. An employer, agency like OSHA, or licensing or certification agency may require continuing education or specific training.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health Science
Course Length: Semester

Technology and Business

Technology and Business

Technology and Business is a year-long, high school elective that teaches students technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits needed to make a successful transition into the workplace or postsecondary education. In this course, students gain an understanding of emerging technologies, operating systems, and computer networks. In addition, they create a variety of business documents, including complex word-processing documents, spreadsheets with charts and graphs, database files, and electronic presentations.This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

  1. Emerging Technologies
  2. Operating Systems
  3. Word Processing
  4. Spreadsheets
  5. Databases
  6. Communication Skills
  7. Telecommunications
  8. Electronic Presentations
  9. Computer Networks
  10. Project Management

By the end of the course, the student should be able to do the following:

  • Select the appropriate technology to address business needs.
  • Describe and compare types of operating systems.
  • Use the computer's operating system to execute work responsibilities.
  • Identify the purpose and style of various business documents.
  • Create complex word-processing documents with columns, bulleted lists, tables, and graphs.
  • Improve speed and accuracy of keyboarding.
  • Use spreadsheets to calculate, graph, solve business problems, and make predictions.
  • Perform data-management procedures using database technology. •Demonstrate communication skills for obtaining and conveying information.
  • Send and receive information using electronic mail, following appropriate guidelines.
  • Describe and identify components of the telecommunications industry.
  • Create and deliver an effective presentation following presentation guidelines.
  • Describe the components required to establish a network.
  • Identify the information management requirements and business needs of an organization.
  • Use project-management tools and processes to manage a business project successfully.

Below is a list of generic resources required to complete the course:

  • word-processor software
  • spreadsheet software
  • database software
  • presentation software
  • e-mail

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Year

Small Business Entrepreneurship

Small Business Entrepreneurship

This semester-long course is designed to provide the skills needed to effectively organize, develop, create, and manage your own business, while exposing you to the challenges, problems, and issues faced by entrepreneurs. Throughout this course, you will be given the chance to see what kinds of opportunities exist for small business entrepreneurs and become aware of the necessary skills for running a business. You will become familiar with the traits and characteristics that are found in successful entrepreneurs, and you will see how research, planning, operations, and regulations can affect small businesses. You will learn how to develop plans for having effective business management and marketing strategies.

Small Business Entrepreneurship will teach you basic principles of entrepreneurship and business ethics. You'll look at the major steps relevant to starting a new business. These steps include financing, marketing, and managing. Knowing how to analyze a business plan will help you develop one, while at the same time making it easier for you to understand the reasons businesses have to write one. Small Business Entrepreneurship is designed to give you an overview on running a business from start to finish.

Objectives

  • Understand the basic aspects of entrepreneurship.
  • Recognize the legal environment of a small business.
  • Describe basic economic principles.
  • Understand scarcity and forecasting.
  • Identify different kinds of costs.
  • Explain the principles of financing.
  • Identify kinds of financial records.
  • Know the sources of financing.
  • Explain target markets.
  • Analyze market research and competition.
  • Describe marketing mix.
  • Recognize the roles of management.
  • Construct a business plan.

Students must be computer literate and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Word processing and presentation software may be required to produce projects.

State: National, California, Florida, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Washington
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Principles of Business and Finance

Principles of Business and Finance

This course will introduce students to the fundamental structure of the American economy, the complexities of the global economy, and the principles, practices, and strategies associated with starting, managing, or simply working for a business.

Through a combination of lessons and projects, students will trace a trajectory of their potential role in the American economy as consumers, laborers, and executives. With lessons on everything from marketing to writing formal business correspondence, from the basic structures and legal definitions of business to the operations and importance of financial institutions, students will emerge from this course with a thorough introductory understanding of the business world.

Students will perform research, conduct interviews, and write papers on various topics designed to enrich their understandingof the American business environment. They will also navigate an interactive and creative project that spans the length of the course and asks students to engage their learning, imaginations and individual career motivation with the course material.

  • Unit 1: The Business Organization: Unit I takes students to the front door of business, discussing the various structures these commercial enterprises might take, from a sole proprietorship with just one employee to immense multinational corporations. Students examine how, regardless of size, every business has an ethical responsibility to its customers, clients, and employees to provide them products and services that meet the highest standards for quality and integrity, and how a failure to meet these ethical responsibilities likely will result in a dramatic loss of customers and revenue. Students also investigate the roles and responsibilities of those starting, leading, and managing businesses. Students learn about the differences between leaders and managers, about the important role human resource specialists play in recruiting and retaining the best employees available, and how a growing number of professionals today are starting their own businesses and becoming global entrepreneurs. 
  • Unit 2: Technology: Gateway to International Business Opportunities: Students begin this unit discussing the benefits technology has brought to business, ranging from software that manages several “back office” functions such as inventory control, payroll, budgeting, taxes, and communication and then examine how this technology also opens up new markets down the street and across the globe. Today, small business owners in Baltimore can do business with customers in Bahrain, Bangkok, and Brasilia as easily as they can with the family living in the apartment down the street. To be successful, however, that business owner must first understand the cultural and social differences from one country to another and apply the proper business etiquette; how to do this effectively using technology or in face to face meetings is a further topic of investigation in this unit.
  • Unit 3: Economics and Business: Business success depends on a healthy economy, and this unit delves into the nature of the U.S. free-market economy that relies on consumers to influence critical decisions about what to produce and at what price to sell a variety of goods and services. As part of this exploration, we delve into supply and demand, the difference between goods and services, government controls over the economy, needs and wants, and the role of private enterprise in meeting the basic needs of a population. Further, we relate these macroeconomic concepts to the responsibility business leaders have to carefully manage their capital and assets so that they provide the greatest benefit to the greatest number while maintaining a profitable and successful enterprise.
  • Unit 4: Marketing, Markets, Sales and Consumers: Connecting businesses and consumers is in many respects the business of business. This unit begins with an introduction to marketing and advertising, with opportunities for learners to understand the differences between the two and the very distinct roles marketers and advertisers play in bringing products and services to market. We then take a closer look at the traditions of advertising, what changes have been introduced since the Colonial era when merchants would post lists of inventories outside their shops, and how the Internet has opened additional opportunities for businesses to advertise their products and services. We have a frank discussion about the role of the consumer and how the government will step in to protect consumers from products that can cause physical harm as well as services that defraud consumers. The unit concludes with opportunities for students to explore sales techniques and careers and to gain insight into how group dynamics may influence decision making. 
  • Unit 5: The Language of Business and Expressing your Career Interests: This final unit of Principles of Business and Finance provides students an opportunity to develop the basic skills they will need to succeed in a business environment, beginning with a discussion of appropriate and inappropriate forms of communication in the business setting. Students are encouraged to try their hand at formatting formal business letters, memoranda, and e-mail messages using the suggestions and guidelines presented in this lesson. They have opportunities to become familiar with PowerPoint and other presentation software and to look at the changes these products have made to the business. The unit concludes with encouragement to the student to quite literally, “Get out there!” and use the skills and insight they have garnered in their efforts to land a great job in the business community.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Office 2013 Applications II

Office 2013 Applications II

Office 2013 Applications II is a semester-length, high school elective course that explores the use of application skills in the 2013 versions of Microsoft® Excel® and Microsoft® Access®. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business spreadsheet and database documents. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

  1. Introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft® Excel® ranging from basic spreadsheet terminology to exploring data entry, formatting, formulas, functions, charts, graphics, and additional features available in backstage view
  2. Skills in Microsoft® Access®, ranging from basic relational database terminology to creating and modifying tables, forms, queries, and reports

Objectives

  • Recognize the elements of an Excel spreadsheet.
  • Demonstrate use of Excel navigation and protection tools.
  • Know how to modify, edit, save, create, and format Excel spreadsheets.
  • Use tools to manage Excel worksheets.
  • Define the rules for creating formulas and functions in Excel worksheets.
  • Demonstrate how to create, modify, and edit charts and shapes in Microsoft Excel.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of database design.
  • Manage the Access Environment.
  • Create an Access database.
  • Create, modify, and edit Access forms, queries, and reports.

MICROSOFT,MICROSOFT WORD,MICROSOFT POWERPOINT,MICROSOFT EXCEL,MICROSOFT ACCESS, AND MICROSOFT PUBLISHER ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Office 2013 Applications I

Office 2013 Applications I

Office 2013 Applications I is a semester-length, high school elective that explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Word®, Publisher®, and PowerPoint® 2013. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business documents, publications, and presentations. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following Microsoft Office® applications:

  1. Microsoft Word: Students are provided with an introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft Word that range from simply developing an understanding of the various uses of Word to more complex explorations of mail merge, tab stops, reference resources, and additional features available in backstage view
  2. Microsoft Publisher: Students learn to create publications, insert and edit publication items, and view, review, and share those publications.
  3. Microsoft PowerPoint: Students will learn how to create presentations, enter and modify content, modify and deliver presentations, and collaborate and share PowerPoint presentations.

Objectives

  • Create, modify, save, and format styles, text, font, pages, and folders in Microsoft Word.
  • Demonstrate use of the Cut, Copy, and Paste commands and the Show/Hide button while editing documents.
  • Show how to use Spell Check, Find and Replace, and AutoCorrect in the Word application.
  • Know how to track changes and add comments in a document.
  • Demonstrate how to insert, format, modify, and edit elements of a Word document.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Microsoft Word advanced skills.
  • Understand the basics of references in Word.Modify document properties including templates.
  • Recognize how to navigate, modify, edit, and review elements of the Microsoft Publisher application.
  • Recall how to print and share a publication electronically.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how to open, modify, insert, create, present, and save elements of a PowerPoint presentation.

MICROSOFT,MICROSOFT WORD,MICROSOFT POWERPOINT,MICROSOFT EXCEL,MICROSOFT ACCESS, AND MICROSOFT PUBLISHER ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Office 2010 Applications II

Office 2010 Applications II

Office Applications II is a semester-length, high school elective course that explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Excel® and Microsoft® Access®. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business spreadsheet and database documents. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

Introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft® Excel® ranging from basic spreadsheet terminology to exploring data entry, formatting, formulas, functions, charts, graphics, and additional features available in backstage vieww
Skills in Microsoft® Access®, ranging from basic relational database terminology to creating and modifying tables, forms, queries, and reports.

Objectives

  • Recognize the elements of an Excel spreadsheet.
  • Demonstrate use of Excel navigation and protection tools.
  • Know how to modify, edit, save, create, and format Excel spreadsheets.
  • Use tools to manage Excel worksheets.
  • Define the rules for creating formulas and functions in Excel worksheets.
  • Demonstrate how to create, modify, and edit charts and shapes in Microsoft Excel.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of database design.
  • Manage the Access Environment.
  • Create an Access database.
  • Create, modify, and edit Access forms, queries, and reports.

Students must be computer literate and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Word processing and presentation software might be required to produce projects.

MICROSOFT,MICROSOFT WORD,MICROSOFT POWERPOINT,MICROSOFT EXCEL,MICROSOFT ACCESS, AND MICROSOFT PUBLISHER ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Office 2010 Applications I

Office 2010 Applications I

Office 2010 Applications I is a semester-length, high school elective that explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Word®, Publisher®, and PowerPoint® 2010. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business documents, publications, and presentations. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following Microsoft Office® applications:

Microsoft Word: Students are provided with an introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft Word that range from simply developing an understanding of the various uses of Word to more complex explorations of mail merge, tab stops, reference resources, and additional features available in backstage view.

  • Microsoft Publisher: Students learn to create publications, insert and edit publication items, and view, review, and share those publications.
  • Microsoft PowerPoint: Students will learn how to create presentations, enter and modify content, modify and deliver presentations, and collaborate and share PowerPoint presentations.
  • Microsoft Word Beginning Skills: Students will learn beginning skills in Word software, including how to create brochures, newsletters and other documents needed in a business environment.
  • Microsoft Word Intermediate Skills: Students continue deepening their Word skills by learning about the finer points of the application, including inserting images, text boxes, shapes and tables into documents, and exploring tools they will use as they review and revise documents.
  • Microsoft Word Advanced Skills: In this unit, students will focus on combining data from multiple sources to create labels and letters. They will also learn about adding special report features to documents such as endnotes, footnotes and hyperlinks.
  • Microsoft Publisher Application: Students will explore the Publisher application, a desktop-publishing application that will allow them to create publications such as newsletters, business cards, brochures, or programs.
  • Microsoft Powerpoint Application: Students will focus on the PowerPoint application and its power to design and deliver presentations. By using this application, they will learn to design, develop, and create presentations that can be delivered in many ways.

MICROSOFT,MICROSOFT WORD,MICROSOFT POWERPOINT,MICROSOFT EXCEL,MICROSOFT ACCESS, AND MICROSOFT PUBLISHER ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Career Management

Career Management

Career management is a semester-length high school elective course that assists students in their preparation for career selection. The course is designed to improve workforce skills needed in all careers including:

  • communication
  • leadership
  • teamwork
  • decision making
  • problem solving
  • goal setting
  • time management

Students will complete activities that help identify personal interests, aptitudes, and learning styles. Students will use results of self-assessments to determine careers that may prove personally satisfying.

  • Unit 1: What is Work? Unit I looks at the elements of employment, from the purpose and personal benefits of work to lifelong learning and technology. Students learn about wages and employment benefits, find out how to maintain a time sheet, set lifestyle goals that match their work goals, and attain problem-solving skills. Students will also explore career clusters and begin a project that helps them which career clusters best match their talents and life goals.
  • Unit 2: Self-Assessment: Students begin this unit discussing their interests, skills and aptitudes. Students also explore their personality traits and values, and their learning styles. In lessons on listening, speaking and writing, students learn about communication skills and how to use them to improve relationships and performance. Teamwork and collaboration round out the unit, and students learn the importance of positive teamwork skills and the opportunities they will find throughout life to use them.
  • Unit 3: Career Research: This unit begins with an emphasis on the skills and tools students should possess for success as a member of the workforce. It continues with an overview of career education, training and qualifications, as well a look at the level of wages and benefits students can expect for different careers. Students will also learn about resources for exploring careers and how to compare careers based on research they conduct.
  • Unit 4: Planning for Your Career: What is appropriate workplace behavior and style, and how does it affect a career? Those are some of the topics students will explore in this unit, which will help them identify some of the benefits wise choices in those areas can have. Students will also learn about workplace trends, such as telecommuting and flextime, and behaviors that they can develop that will make them highly employable. Decision-making steps, goal-setting, mentoring and conflict management will also be studied, as will the importance of extracurricular and community activities.
  • Unit 5: Preparing for Your Career: Some of the nuts and bolts of acquiring a job are the focus of this unit, as students explore resumes, cover letters, job applications and finding job leads. Skills to help students through the job-seeking process are also taught through lessons on researching potential employers as well as on interview behaviors and follow-up.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Business Law

Business Law

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of some of the vital legal concepts that affect commerce and trade, after first gaining some familiarity with how laws are created and interpreted. Students will then be introduced to the types of businesses that can be created to engage in commerce as well as the contractual and liability considerations that can impact a business. Laws that affect how a business is regulated will also be reviewed, particularly the impact of administrative rules and regulations on a business. Global commerce and international agreements, treaties, organizations, and courts that can affect business will be discussed to get a better sense of what it means to "go global" with a business.

Consumer and environmental protections will be explained as well as bankruptcy options, should a business go insolvent. Lastly, no business exists without experiencing some kind of dispute or another, and so we will review the options that exist for dispute resolution and alternative dispute resolution to provide a better understanding of how best to deal with such matters.

  • Unit 1: The Role of Law and Its Impact on Business: Chapter 1 focuses on the legislative and executive branches of government and discussed the functions of each branch. In the second chapter, students begin a discussion on corporations by reviewing sole proprietorships and agency relationships.
  • Unit 2: Legal Considerations in Business Law: In this unit, students are introduced to the three elements that must be present for a contract to be valid: offer, acceptance and consideration. Students will also examine the Uniform Commercial Code, a federal law that regulates contracts for the sale of goods, including Internet contracts. Students also learn about the three types of contract defenses – validity of formation, inability to perform the contract, and inability to enforce a contract. Torts (civil wrongs causing injury to others) and defenses are also examined, as are liability and nuisance.
  • Unit 3: Regulating a Business: Unit 3 examines ethics and the law, including a discussion about how we determine what is right and what is wrong. Crimes against property are also probed, including white-collar crime. Criminal and civil procedure are also reviewed, including the key stages of each. An examination of administrative law and its history, the commerce clause, and employment law comprise the second half of this unit.
  • Unit 4: Global Commerce: Unit 4 introduces the concept of intellectual property and its protections, including trademarks, patents and copyrights. E-commerce is also discussed, as is international law and free trade and the free flow of capital in an increasingly integrated global economy.
  • Unit 5: Protections and Resolutions: In Unit 5, students examine consumer protection, environmental protection. Bankruptcy law and dispute resolution are also probed.

Course Requirements
While there are no formal requirements for this course, it is important to understand that this is a challenging course requiring your best critical-thinking skills. The ability to conduct research, make lateral connections, and consider options not clearly outlined is a function of those who successfully practice the law. This course uses scenarios and case studies to apply the concepts offered and encourages creative (but legal and ethical) thinking. For the student who is considering a career in thelaw, this course is a good primer.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester