At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the North Dakota Content Standards.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Media Studies

Media Studies

This course is part of a worldwide educational movement called media literacy. The goal of the media literacy movement is to educate people about how the media impacts both individuals and society. Students will examine media such as magazines, the Internet, video games, and movies. They'll learn the kinds of strategies that advertisers use to persuade people to buy products. They'll also explore how news broadcasters choose which stories to air. Lessons and projects encourage students to examine ways in which media helps shape our culture and the ways in which our culture shapes the media. While many media literacy courses focus upon learning how to make media, this one will focus exclusively on analyzing the media.

This course has 1 semester-length unit containing 31 instructional lessons and 20 projects. Most lessons in this course are designed to take 1-2 days to complete, while most projects take 2-3 days.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Fine Arts
Course Length: Semester

Digital Arts

Digital Arts

Digital Arts is a semester-long elective designed to provide computer science students with an introduction to visualization-graphics programming on computers. To equip students for today's digitally driven lifestyle, this course focuses on using a digital camera and the practical application of digital imaging and editing programs. Additionally, students will work with audio-editing programs, and will also examine 3D technology and cinematography.

Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they've read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

State: National, California, Florida, Georgia, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Washington
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Fine Arts
Course Length: Semester

Art History

Art History

Students will develop knowledge of the history and theory of art and the relationship between artist, artwork, and society, including researching and critiquing periods, styles, and works of art from early civilizations through modern and contemporary art. Additionally, students will complete extended, focused projects that will challenge their research, writing, and analysis skills.

  • Semester 1: Students will conduct an in-depth examination of art history, beginning with prehistoric art and ending with the Romantic era of the early nineteenth century; students will understand the impact that historical and cultural context has on art, and will closely examine specific visual examples of key concepts.
  • Semester 2: Students will continue an advanced exploration of art history, beginning with early photography and ending with contemporary art, including art from cultures and countries around the world; students will complete research and writing projects to demonstrate their learning of key ideas.

Please note that throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in theirnotes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Fine Arts
Course Length: Semester

Business Computer Information Systems

Business Computer Information Systems

BUSINESS COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS is a high school elective that explores the use of technology applications in both business and personal situations. The course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

  • communication skills
  • business technology
  • word processing applications
  • spreadsheet applications
  • database applications
  • telecommunications technology
  • desktop publishing technology
  • presentation technology
  • computer networks
  • computer operating systems

The course is intended to help students arrive at the following understandings:

  • Effective communications skills and productive work habits can increase employees’ success.
  • Technology solutions can help employees be more productive and effective.

Keyboarding is a stated prerequisite for this course. While there are some keyboarding reviews in the course, there is no keyboarding instruction.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business
Course Length: Year

Technology and Research

Technology and Research

This semester-long course uses the topic of technology as a way to help students develop fundamental knowledge of the steps in the research process. During the course, students learn how new technology is developed and evaluate ways that technology affects society. Students learn about the development of the personal computer, robots, blogs, and wikis. They learn researchand writing skills such as how to evaluate scientific journal articles, how to write an abstract, and how and when to use different online sources.

Most of the lessons contain optional activities for students. These activities encourage students to reflect on what they’ve learned. The activities are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. 

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

  • Define technology and describe how and why new technologies are developed
  • Describe how science and technology are related
  • Compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative research
  • Develop and refine a research question
  • List how and when to use different online sources
  • Evaluate a scientific journal article
  • Write an abstract
  • Successfully write a 10- to 15-page research paper (at least 2000 words)
  • Develop a creative way to present research information

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business
Course Length: Semester

Essentials of Communication

Essentials of Communication

Essentials of Communication: A Guide to Interacting Effectively in Today's World™ is a five-unit elective course for high school students. The materials cover fundamentals of the communication process important for successful interaction in a variety of social and professional settings. Students can use the course to gain and apply knowledge about communication theories, characteristics of language and language use, interpersonal relationships, group dynamics, and public speaking in order to interact more effectively with others.

The course seeks to help students expand their knowledge and skills as communicators so that they may achieve the following goals:

  • Know and understand aspects of communication theories and processes appropriate to both social and professional settings.
  • Use interpersonal communication strategies appropriately in social and professional settings.
  • Effectively communicate in social and professional group settings.
  • Plan, prepare, deliver, and evaluate formal and informal personal and professional presentations.

In attaining these goals, students will be better equipped to use communication to hone other life skills, including exchanging information, fulfilling social obligations, developing relationships, and understanding and meeting the needs of others

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business
Course Length: Semester

Essentials of Business

Essentials of Business

This semester-long course is an introduction to the goals, processes, and operations of business enterprises for students. The main focus is on the functions that a company – whether a multinational corporation or a corner grocery store – must manage effectively to be successful. These include accounting, finance, human resource management, marketing, operations management, and strategic planning. Attention is also given to the legal environment in which businesses operate, and the importance of business ethics and corporate citizenship.

Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

  • Apply business concepts to their lives
  • Compare and contrast market economies with controlled economy
  • Describe the six areas of human resource management
  • List and define the legal forms of business ownership
  • Name and describe the components of successful business communication
  • Analyze ways in which technology is changing business operations

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business
Course Length: Semester

Psychology

Psychology

Psychology is an introductory elective course for high school students. Throughout the course students will examine influences on human actions and beliefs, factors influencing behavior and perception, and basic psychological theories. Students will develop and apply their understanding of psychology through lessons and projects that require interaction and observation of others.

  • Unit 1: Students will be introduced to the beginnings of psychology, research methods, and ethics of the profession.
  • Unit 2: Students will examine the biology of behavior, sensory processes, motivation, and stress.
  • Unit 3: Students will learn about the stages of human development and personality.
  • Unit 4: Students will discover the different methods of learning, aspects of memory, language, and levels of consciousness.
  • Unit 5: Students will explore mental disorders and abnormal behaviors and how to treat them. They will also why people obey and influence other’s behavior.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Careers in Architecture and Construction

Introduction to Careers in Architecture and Construction

The goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of careers in Architecture and Construction in order to assist with informed career decisions. This dynamic, rapidly evolving career cluster is comprised of three pathways (fields): Design and Pre-Construction (Architecture and Engineering); Construction (Construction and Extraction); and Maintenance and Operations (Installation, Maintenance, and Repair). The Architecture and Construction career cluster is defined as careers in building, designing, managing, maintaining, and planning the built environment.

The built environment is not limited to buildings and structures—or to urban environments. A much broader view of the built environment helps students gain a better and more holistic understanding of the impact of the Architecture and Construction industries. The built environment encompasses all zones of human activity—from natural conservation areas with minimal human intervention to highly dense areas with tall skyscrapers and intricate highway systems to suburban cul-de-sacs. The interrelated components that make up the built environment are as varied and unique as the professionals who help shape it.

  • Unit 1: Introduction to Careers in Architecture and Construction: Students will learn that shaping the built environment is an ongoing, cyclical process involving three phases (CCTC Pathways): Design and Pre-Construction, Construction, and Maintenance and Operations. All components within the built environment fall into one of these phases in the cycle—with the exception of places that are no longer in use and left to neglect. In other words, every man-made element is being designed, constructed, altered, repaired or maintained, or demolished. Components of the built environment include structures (residential, commercial, industrial, educational, recreational, institutional, etc.); site (landscaped grounds, parking lots, pathways, sidewalks, etc.); public utilities (water, sewer, streetlights, etc.) and right-of-way (public sidewalks, streets, bike lanes, etc.); civic infrastructure (bridges, canals, highways, railroads, trolleys, etc.).
  • Unit 2: Building the Future—the Art and Science of Buildings: Students will learn that architecture and structures have often been used as symbols of the greatness, might, and power of a civilization or kingdom. Our advances in technology and art have served as metaphors for our advancement as a collective people, kingdom, or nation. The great pyramids of Egypt signaled a civilization that valued energy, the cosmos, and the afterlife above the mundane existence on the Nile. Gothic cathedrals with their spires reached for the heavens and were part of elaborate pilgrimage routes in the middle ages. The skyscraper, arguably the architectural symbol of the United States, is now a symbol of greatness and wealth around the world—and constant competition seeks to build taller and taller. Modernist architecture expressed a love for mechanization, standardization, and great design through simplicity, truth to materials, and ergonomic considerations. Today, a tall, dense skyline is one of the key markers of a world-class city. Through architecture, society defines itself and builds symbols its collective aspirations. However, to fully understand the impact of construction, we must understand the breath of typologies and sectors of the construction industry. This unit explores architectures love affair with technology, science, and innovation. It explores the art and science of building, through the professions that have been most influential: the architect and the engineer.
  • Unit 3: Green Jobs in Architecture and Construction: Students will learn that the building industry consumes a tremendous amount of resources, contributes significantly to landfills, and produces a large percentage of the world’s greenhouse gases. The U.S. Green Building Council reported that in 2008, buildings accounted for 30%-40% of the world’s energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions. Building construction is responsible for half of the U.S.’s total greenhouse emissions and close to one-third of its solid waste stream. The practice of sustainable design is referred to as green building. Green construction has grown dramatically to form a large sector of the economy. Fundamentally, green building takes into account energy efficiency, building in accordance with climate (not against it), using natural sources of energy (sun, wind, water, air), and using materials that are sustainable, renewable, and reusable. Green building accounts for and considers the life cycle of a building from cradle to grave, including logistics and transport of materials used in buildings, construction site management, and the energy efficiency of the building itself. No single agency has had a more profound impact on green building than the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and their LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) rating program for construction projects and professionals. Currently the USGBC boasts 76 chapters, 13,000-member companies and organizations, and more than 181,000 professionals who hold LEED credentials. Buildings are assessed on a project scorecard tallying up points in various categories.
  • Unit 4: The Arts and the Built Environment: Jobs For Creatives: Students will learn that creativity and artistic expression are not solely the responsibility and purview of the architect. Aside from problem solving skills, there are many careers in Architecture & Construction, often considered specialties, which employ creative skills and artistic personality types. From illustrators using computer animation, to an ironworker commissioned to create a one-of-a-kind ornamental fence, to a preservation tradesman skilled in historic construction methods, there are many careers that range from conceptually driven technology to hands-on artistry. Fundamental to these highly specialized careers in all pathways of Architecture & Construction is the interdisciplinary integration of history, the building arts, the visual arts, botany, and fashion to create a unique product.
  • Unit 5: Building the City: Students will learn that a building does not exist in isolation. A building exists not only on its site and in relation to its landscape, but also in relation to other buildings and often to a cityscape or an agricultural area. Even if there is not another structure or person for miles, an infrastructure connects that building to a port, village, town, urban center, or metropolis. The idea of urbanization dates back to the first settlements of the Bronze Age over 6,000 years ago. Ever since societies shifted from nomadic, hunter-gatherer tribes to sedentary, agricultural societies, there have been urban centers. The Roman Empire marks the true beginning of civic building and the unofficial beginnings of the profession of civil engineering with the building of these streets, public aqueducts, bridges, and ports. Urban planners are a relatively new profession when compared to the history of human urbanization itself. Professionals working in the field are guided by fundamental concepts of planning, working with civil engineers to create vibrant spaces for people and communities.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Architecture & Construction
Course Length: Semester

Construction Careers

Construction Careers

This course in Construction Technology introduces students to the basics of construction, building systems, engineering principles, urban planning, and sustainability. Students will learn the key techniques in building all types of buildings, as well as the key individuals involved in each step of the process. Many lessons present information on green building techniques and concepts that are becoming a standard part of the construction industry. Safety practices are emphasized in several lessons because construction is one of the most dangerous industries; students will learn that there is no way to be successful in construction without taking such issues seriously. Toward this end, the lessons also explore regulatory agencies and guidelines established for protecting not only construction workers but also the occupants of a building.

  • Unit 1: Introduction to Careers in Construction Technology: This unit introduces students to the construction process before it discusses careers in detail. Student are introduced to current trends in technology and the types of drawings—floor plan, site plan, and elevation view—that nearly all construction workers need to be able to read. Students then explore various construction careers such as those of civil engineers, general contractors, excavators, masons, ironworkers, electricians and others. We discuss how many of these workers learn their skills through an apprenticeship that moves to a journeyman position before they finally earn master status.
  • Unit 2: Building Life-Cycle Assessment and Regulation: This unit puts the buildings front and center. First, students learn to apply the life-cycle assessment process to buildings, which helps them see how their work and the decisions they make affect a building’s longevity and functionality. This is the course’s introduction into issues of sustainability and energy efficiency. This unit also focuses on job-site safety and building codes. Students also explore building codes, inspection procedures, and construction risk management along with the duties of a building inspector and the home inspector. Finally, students are introduced to urban planning and zoning, and learn about the history of urban sprawl. Students will learn about regional planning and the New Urbanism, which seeks to shape the built environment into something more sustainable and less taxing on our limited natural resources.
  • Unit 3: Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1: This is the first of two units that focus on building materials and methods of construction. First students explore building foundations. Different buildings need different types of foundations and knowing how to properly construct them all is the work of the concrete worker and the mason. In lessons on steel frame construction, we take a brief look at the history of mass-produced steel. Students also explore jobs such as that the ironworker, the individual often perched many floors above street level, welding and riveting steel beams into place. Turning from commercial to residential construction, the next few lessons focus on heavy timber-frame construction and light-frame construction. Finally, students learn about builders and labor/management relations.
  • Unit 4: Building Materials and Methods of Construction 2: The second unit of building materials and methods of construction is divided between lessons on roofs, the building envelope, cladding, and the field of building science. Students learn about a roof’s structural importance to the building and its various components. Students also learn about roofing truss systems, based on the triangle, uniquely engineered for strength and durability. Finally, commercial roofs and roofing materials are explained, along with the duties of the professional roofer. The first chapter’s final lesson introduces students to green roofs and solar roofs. In the next chapter students explore the concept of the building envelope, the system that serves as a barrier between the interior and the exterior world. Next, a building’s skin—its cladding—is discussed, and students will learn that a structure’s cladding and its envelope are not one and the same. Finally, students explore the academic discipline of building science, especially its quest to make buildings stronger and more impervious to natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes.
  • Unit 5: Green Technology, Sustainability, and Preservation: The final unit focuses on green technology, sustainability, and preservation—all subjects that have been touched on before, but now they become the star of the show. Sustainable construction and green construction codes comes first. A close look at green building materials is next. Students also explore “green” jobs in the construction industry. The course’s last chapter focuses on historical preservation and adaptive reuse.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Architecture & Construction
Course Length: Semester