At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the North Dakota Content Standards.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Twentieth Century American History

Twentieth Century American History

Twentieth Century American History is a history elective for high school students interested in examining American history during a century of change, continuity, and conflicts.

Students will examine America's economic, political, governmental, cultural, and technological growing pains during the twentieth century. They will also consider the causes and effects of national and international cooperation, competition, andconflict.

In attaining these goals, students will develop insight and perspective on the themes and patterns of history and a greater understanding of today's world.

  • Unit 1: Students will examine the major economic, political, and social changes of the 1800s including: The Industrial Revolution, urbanization, and immigration.
  • Unit 2: Students will explore the effects of the late 1800s by looking at all aspects of Progressivism.
  • Unit 3: Students will study issues that occurred after World War I, including the Russian Revolution, the Red Scare, and the three presidents following Woodrow Wilson.
  • Unit 4: Students will obtain knowledge on World War II, the Cold War, Eisenhower, and post-war American society.
  • Unit 5: Students will identify the Civil Rights Movement, the rise of conservatism, post-Cold War foreign policy, and the economic and social issues facing contemporary America.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester

Personal Financial Literacy

Personal Financial Literacy

Personal Financial Literacy is a semester-length elective designed to help high school students prepare for success in making financial decisions throughout their lives. Topics in the course address the advantages of making sound financial decisions in both the short and long term, income planning, money management, saving and investing, and consumer rights and responsibilities.

  • Financial Responsibility and Decision-making: This unit helps students gain knowledge about money and what they can do with money. Students will learn that it's important to become financially literate, so they can make smart financial decisions about sales and purchases, credit, investments and budgets.
  • Careers and Income: This unit introduces students to information about careers, concepts to know before starting a business, sources of income, and paying income taxes.
  • Money Management: Budgets and spending as well as financial institutions and the tools they offer are the focus of this unit. Students will also learn about financial risks and strategies to manage them.
  • Saving and Investing: Students will learn about the benefits of opening a saving account, types of interest, investing, and financial planning and the elements a plan should include.
  • Credit, Debt, and Consumer Skills: This unit discusses credit, loans, and consumer rights. Students will learn about credit cards and the costs and hazards of using them. Loans and mortgages will also be reviewed as will consumer rights and protections.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester

Civil War

Civil War

You are about to embark on the fascinating history of the Civil War. It is a story of human choices that linked the past to the present and influenced the future. It is a drama of how one nation changed through times of conflict and cooperation. It is a tale of two children (the North and South) living under the same roof (The United States) and how they disagreed over the issues of states' rights and slavery.

Students will also gain practice in research, using technology, and writing through various projects. In addition to the default course program, Civil War Elective includes alternate projects, essays, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

  • Unit 1: Students will compare and contrast the characteristics of the North and South, the development of slavery in the South, and the events that started the Civil War.
  • Unit 2: Students will examine the war strategies, battles, and majors events of the Civil War.
  • Unit 3: Students will explore many aspects of the war including: the presidencies of Lincoln and Davis, the generals, turning points, role of women and African Americans, and the effects of the war on the U.S.
  • Unit 4: Students will gain knowledge about the later years of the war including: Grant’s war of attrition, Sherman’s advances in the South, the life of a soldier, prisoners of war, and the last few months of Lincoln’s life.
  • Unit: 5: Students will describe the events that led to the end of the Civil War, examine the plans for Reconstruction, and identify three amendments that passed during this time.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester

Physical Fitness

Physical Fitness

Physical Fitness is a semester-length elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on the health benefits of regular physical activity and of a long-term exercise program. As students work through the course, they will learn about the many aspects of physical fitness, including basic nutrition, the importance of flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscle and strength training, and realistic goal setting. Along the way, students will be required to maintain and submit an activity log in order to measure progress in course exercises, as well as in personal fitness goals.

Upon completion of Physical Fitness, students should possess the knowledge and skills needed to do the following:

  • Analyze the key components of successful physical activity and use this analysis to determine if a program is reasonable and effective.
  • Describe the three main types of physical activity that should be included in a exercise regime and the health benefits of each.
  • Perform basic fitness exercises associated with the three main types of physical activity discussed in this course.
  • Identify the main motivational strategies that can be used to help the student continue in positive fitness habits once this course is completed

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education is a semester-long elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on performance of individual and team sports, with explanations of proper technique, rules of the game, and preparation. Team sports introducedinclude soccer, basketball, football, baseball, and volleyball. An introduction to fitness, strength, endurance, and nutrition is also included.

Students will have the opportunity to perform each sport on their own time, while keeping a log of activity. The goal is in corporation of activity into their daily lives and the gain of lifelong healthy fitness habits. Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notesare not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

Upon completion of Physical Education, students should possess the knowledge and skills needed to do the following:

  • Define physical fitness and describe the components of being physically fit
  • Evaluate their fitness level
  • Apply physical fitness, nutrition-related, and weight-management skills to their lives
  • Understand and apply safe exercise rules
  • Describe the history and rules of sports such as basketball, baseball, football, soccer, volleyball, and gymnastics
  • Describe and apply skills needed for a variety of sports

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Personal and Family Living

Personal and Family Living

This semester-long high school elective takes students on an interactive exploration of the challenges they may face as they transition into adulthood, including constructive conflict resolution, nutrition and health, building healthy families, financial responsibility, and long-term employment.

Objectives

  • Examine specific principles that will help develop their personal lives.
  • Learn about proper nutrition and demonstrate skill in preparing various food items.
  • Prepare weekly and monthly budgets.
  • Develop strategies for an employment search.
  • Explore work and careers and how different interests, abilities and personalities influence employment decisions.
  • Develop an understanding of relational dynamics with family members, friends, classmates, co-workers, and those encountered in the marketplace.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Health Education

Health Education

Health Education is a health science elective course that introduces students to what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do to achieve good health.

  • Body Essentials: This unit introduces the different systems in the human body, showing how the body develops.
  • Physical Health: This unit demonstrates to students how they may develop good practices as they promote proper physical health.
  • Social and Mental Health: This unit teaches how to establish strong social and mental health though true health wisdom.
  • Preventive Healthcare and First Aid: This unit focuses instruction on safety, emergency care, and disease prevention.
  • Responsible Living: This unit discusses how students may apply the principles of good stewardship, covering topics like pollution, drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Health Quest

Health Quest

Health Quest is a health science elective course for upper elementary and junior high students. The curriculum introduces students to the concepts of what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do to achieve good health.

  • Your Body: This unit introduces the different systems in the human body, showing how the body develops from birth through childhood, during adolescence, and in adulthood.
  • Health: This unit demonstrates to students how they may develop good practices as they promote proper mental, emotional, physical, and social health.
  • Nutrition and Fitness: This unit teaches how to establish healthy eating practices and proper fitness routines.
  • Health Maintenance: This unit focuses on safety, emergency care, and disease prevention.
  • Responsible Living: This unit discusses how students may apply the principles of responsible living, covering topics such as pollution, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy.

State: National
Grade Level: 7, 8
Category: Health
Course Length: Semester

Music Theory

Music Theory

Students will explore the nature of music, integrating the key concepts of rhythm and meter, written music notation, the structure of various scale types, interval qualities, melody and harmony, the building of chords, and transposition. Throughout the series of assignments, ear training exercises are interspersed with the bones of composition technique, building in students the ability not only to hear and appreciate music, but step-by-step, to create it in written form as well. This highly interactive course culminates in the students producing original compositions, which while based on standard notation, demonstrate facets of personal expression. As the students’ ability to perform increases in the future, they will better understand music and therefore better demonstrate its intrinsic communication of emotion and ideas.

  • Rhythm and Meter: Students will build a foundational understanding of the elements of musical rhythm and meter, including the measure of different notes, time signatures, and special rhythms; additionally, students will participate in ear training exercises to build their skill in this area.
  • Notation and Pitch: Students will identify musical symbols, intervals, and instrumentation, and will be able to use this knowledge to compose and original melody.
  • Scales and Key Signatures: Students will examine scaled and both major and minor keys; projects include ongoing ear training exercises, the transposition of a melody to a new key, and the composition of original, non-diatonic melodies.
  • Harmony: Students will construct an understanding of the key aspects of harmony including the various categories of intervals and triads and participate in ongoing ear training exercises; this unit culminates in the independent composition of a simple accompaniment.
  • Making Music: Students will actively participate in the interpretation and composition of music, utilizing their knowledge of musical elements such as rhythm, pitch, key, harmony, and expression.
  • Course Review and Exam: Students will complete a full review of key course concepts and demonstrate their mastery through a final examination.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Fine Arts
Course Length: Semester

Music Appreciation

Music Appreciation

Students will build a strong foundation of knowledge focused on basic musical elements and the development and growth of classical music, and will acquire a greater appreciation of music. Additionally, students will examine music in the world around them and discover how they experience music. They'll be introduced to the basic elements and sounds of music and instruments, learn the names and backgrounds of several famous musical composers, and learn how and where classical music began, how it developed over the centuries, and the ways in which music and culture affect each other. Lastly, students will examine the ways modern music has been influenced by classical music.

  • Discovering Music: Students will learn the basics of listening to, responding to, and participating in music, including completing independent projects that utilize engaged listening skills; students will also understand music from other cultures.
  • Music Fundamentals: Students will understand the fundamentals of music, including key concepts such as rhythm, melody, harmony, form, expression, and the types and categories of musical instruments.
  • Beginnings of Music: Students will examine early music history, spanning from medieval times to the Baroque era, and complete focused research and writing projects on the topic.
  • Developing Music: Students will explore a variety of classical and romantic music, continuing to participate in independent engaged listening projects to continue advancement of key skills.
  • Modern Music: Students will focus on music of the twentieth-century, including popular, Broadway, and film music, culminating in project requiring students to attend and critique a classical concert in their community.
  • Course Review and Exam: Students will complete a full review of key course concepts, and demonstrate their mastery through a final examination.

Please note that this course provides students with lessons in engaged listening. These special lessons allow students to listen and respond to music. A template for how to listen and respond is provided.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Fine Arts
Course Length: Semester