At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the New York Learning Standards, Core Curriuclum, and Framework.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

English I

English I

01001 NY

Students should enter English I with a foundation in fiction, drama, poetry, mythology, and nonfiction. This course will provide them with the opportunity to build on that foundation. They will engage in in-depth analysis of more complex literature, view that literature from its historical perspective, and connect it to other arts. They will write literary analyses, logical arguments, informational/explanatory texts, narratives, and focused research projects. These writing tasks will be both formal and informal. Additionally, they will engage in speaking and listening activities that use and incorporate media and technology. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will grow their vocabulary and their understanding of how to communicate effectively by making skillful choices when expressing themselves with language.

To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. The content is both rigorous and relevant and includes high-quality contemporary works as well as the classics of literature. Students will be enriched as they expand their skills and confidence in English language arts through a comprehensive study.

State: New York
Grade Level: 9
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

Security and Protective Services

Security and Protective Services

This course offers an overview of the security and protective services industry. Students will understand different types of security services and how they relate to one another. They will also understand the distinction between the criminal justice system within the public sector and private security. The course begins with an introduction to the history of private security, with subsequent units focusing on a specific sector. The concluding unit focuses on the emerging challenges facing security services in the twenty-first century, including international terrorism. In addition, the course will provide information about many different careers that are available to students who are interested in security and protective services.

  • Private Security Career Paths, their History and Legal Development of Security Services: This unit focuses on the history of security services, how the industry has advanced, and the legal aspects associated with it.
  • Physical Security Services: This unit explores the day-to-day operations in security services, including loss prevention, private investigation, and corporate espionage.
  • Interactions with the Public and Communications: This unit focuses on communicating effectively with the public as part of the criminal justice and security industry sectors.
  • Security Operations: This unit focuses on a broad range of methods for conducting security and safety operations and how they are integrated for best management practices.
  • Security in the 21st Century: This unit focuses on the emerging challenges facing private security in the twenty-first century and the implications for local, national, and international security efforts.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Legal Services

Legal Services

The Legal Services course will provide students with an overview of the system of laws in the United States and the practice areas and career options in the field. Students will learn about how the legal system operates to control how society punishes those who commit crimes and settles disputes, as well as how criminal and civil cases reach court and are resolved. They will learn about the courtroom and the basics of a typical court case. Students will learn about constitutional rights and legal safeguards, as well as how technology has changed the practice of law. They will also learn about legal education and careers in law for attorneys and non-attorneys with an interest in the field.

  • The Law: Origins and Structure: This unit focuses on the origins of law in the United States and the structure of the U.S. legal system, so students understand the basis of the current legal structure.
  • The Courtroom and the Case: This unit explores the people and procedures involved in legal cases.
  • Contemporary Law Topics: This unit focuses on two areas of law relevant today—civil rights and the use of technology in law enforcement and throughout the legal system.
  • Evidence and Forensics: This unit focuses on the concepts of evidence and testimony—two ways that parties in a lawsuit provide proof for their side of the case.
  • Post-secondary Legal Education and Careers in the Legal Field: This unit focuses on legal education and careers in the legal field.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Law Enforcement Field Services

Law Enforcement Field Services

Law Enforcement Field Services Course OverviewThe Introduction to Law Enforcement Services course will introduce students to the field of law enforcement and the local, county, state, and federal laws that law enforcement personnel are sworn to uphold. The student will also gain an understanding of the career options available in this field and the skills, education, and background experience needed to succeed in these careers. Students will learn about the evolution of the role of law enforcement in the United States and the interplay between individual freedoms and the government’s need to protect the country. They will also learn about key changes affecting law enforcement following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, including the creation of new laws, the restructuring of many departments within the federal government, and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security. Students will learn about the interaction between local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. The lessons will emphasize the importance of interagency communication and information sharing. Students will learn about the technological advances and new federal programs that aid cooperation between agencies. Students will also learn about the types of crime that are commonly committed and the procedures, evidence collection techniques, and technological advances that law enforcement personnel use to investigate them. Students will learn how the development of computers and the Internet has changed the way many crimes are committed. They will also learn how investigators address the resulting increased globalization of criminal activity.

  • A Tradition of Safe Communities: This unit focuses on the history of law enforcement in the United States and the differences between the responsibilities of local, country, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.•Local and State Law Enforcement: This unit explores the background requirements needed for a career in local, county, and state law enforcement and the training options available for various positions. It also investigates the daily responsibilities of local, county, and state law enforcement officers and their role in disaster situations.
  • Federal Law Enforcement: This unit describes the history and scope of the authority of federal law enforcement agencies. It also examines the role of various federal agencies and the similarities and differences between civilian and military investigative agencies.
  • Crime and Criminals: This unit explores the distinction between crimes against an individual, crimes against property, and crimes against a community. It also investigates the relationship between constitutionally guaranteed freedoms and the government’s need to protect the community.
  • 21st Century Policing: In this unit, students learn about the technological advances that have revolutionized how law enforcement agents enforce laws, investigate crimes, and protect the public. It also explores the educational requirements for a career in law enforcement and the additional training required to work in specialized areas. 

For the topics and assignments in this course, it will be helpful for the student to have a general understanding of the structure of the federal government and the relationship between local, county, state, and federal governments. He or she should have the ability to communicate thoughts in written and oral form and be able to use factual data to defend an opinion. It will also be useful for the student to be familiar with conducting online research and be able to evaluate the credibility of online sources. If a student is not comfortable assessing the credibility of online sources, information on this topic can be found on a variety of educational websites, including:

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security

Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security

Life in the twenty-first century would not be possible without police officers, paramedics, firefighters, attorneys, corrections officers or security guards. In this course, students will learn about the many careers that exist within the fields of law, law enforcement, public safety, corrections, and security. Besides learning about the training and educational requirements for these careers, students will explore the history of these fields and how they developed to their current state. Students will also learn how these careers are affected by and affect local, state, and federal laws. Finally, students will examine the relationships between professionals in these fields and how collaborations between professionals in these careers help to create a safer, more stable society.

  • Law Enforcement Career Paths, their History and their Role in Society: This unit focuses on law enforcement careers, the history of law enforcement in the United States and the role that law enforcement plays in society.
  • Careers in Corrections: This unit explores careers in the corrections fields, including the history of prisons and jails and the nature of probation and parole in the correction fields.
  • American Criminal Law and Legal Services: This unit focuses on American criminal law and legal services, including historical aspects of this field and current career opportunities.
  • Public Safety Services: This unit focuses on public safety services, including firefighters and emergency medical services (EMS) and the history of those fields.
  • Private Security Career Paths, their History and Legal Development of Security Services: This unit focuses on the private security field, including the development of this field, the laws that pertain to it and the careers that are available in this field.

For this course, students should know that:

  • there are many available careers in the law enforcement, public safety, corrections, and security fields.
  • these careers have diverse career paths that combine educational and physical requirements with high standards for training.
  • these careers are directly impacted by local, state, and federal laws

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Fire and Emergency Services

Fire and Emergency Services

Emergency and fire-management services are essential infrastructure components of a community. They provide a resource for dealing with numerous types of emergencies, including fires, motor vehicle, and industrial accidents, and medical emergencies. In addition, these services provide fire prevention and community-outreach programs. This course provides students with the basic structure of these organizations as well as the rules and guidelines that govern pre-employment education requirements. The vehicles, equipment, and emergency-mitigations strategies that are commonly used in the emergency- and fire-management field are also explored. Students will understand the goals of an emergency-management service and how they are implemented and managed, including personnel, budget, and labor-management challenges in the organization. Finally, the course also provides students with an overview of large-scale emergency incidents that overwhelm local agencies. Various preparedness plans are discussed. In the end, students will have been exposed to the typical characteristics and framework ofmodern emergency- and fire-management organizations and will have a better understanding of a career in this field.

  • Modern Emergency and Fire Management Services: This unit discusses the organizational structure of modern emergency medical and fire service systems. It also explains educational requirements for many states for firefighters, EMT, and paramedic positions, and describes common state and local laws that govern emergency-management educational requirements. Additionally, personal characteristics and requirements beyond education were explored.
  • Tools of the Trade: This unit explores the various types of apparatuses used by fire departments in the United States and explains how emergency workers can predict which equipment will be most appropriate in a disaster scenario. The unit also shows how to identify target hazards in a community and how to determine the appropriate special-operations apparatus for a given scenario. Finally, the unit explains how to predict what regulations are required for protection in specialized locations.
  • Emergency and Fire Management Skills in Action: This unit describes the main goals of an emergency and fire management department at the scene of an emergency by explaining the steps in a command sequence and the required results of the steps. This unit also explains how an incident manager chooses which apparatuses are deployed to accomplish various missions. Finally, this unit explores the historical changes that have occurred in fire departments in the United States, specifically focusing on the changes in apparatuses over the years.
  • Organizing and Managing an Emergency and Fire Management System: This unit focuses on how communities are shifting their expectations with respect to fire-personnel roles. It also examines the workforce-diversity changes that have affected emergency-management departments, and challenges and benefits associated with these changes. Finally, it shows how a local government may impact the operations of an emergency agency through funding, and how workers sometimes respond by demanding collective bargaining.
  • Advanced Situations for Emergency and Fire Management Operations: In this unit, students discover different types of disasters, their trends, and their consequences on communities, as well as the risks factors and steps that can minimize these risks. The unit also explains the various levels and components of a disaster-management plan with examples of what a mutual-aid agreement would provide an emergency-management agency to show how this would assist incident mitigation. This unit also builds upon previously learned concepts of demographic changes by investigating the potentials for mass-casualty incidents, especially related to the mass transit of people and cargo.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Corrections: Policies and Procedures

Corrections: Policies and Procedures

Corrections is one of the three branches of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) in the United States. All three branches employ personnel who are authorized to uphold and enforce the law and are required to operate under the rule of law. Each branch works as part of the entire system to maintain the public safety and well-being and bring criminals to justice. Corrections facilities and programs are run by a complex system of policies and procedures, which uphold local, state, and federal laws. This course gives students an introductory, yet thorough view of many aspects of corrections operations. Students receive historical and legal background information as they study how prisons and prisoners have evolved into correctional facilities and programs for offenders. In this course the duties responsibilities, conduct, training, and special certification possibilities for corrections staff are explored. Many aspects of procedures in corrections are reviewed, giving students an in-depth look at what a variety of careers in this growing field encompass and require.

Corrections within the Criminal Justice System: Unit 1 introduces students to the three branches of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections, and how they interact in managing criminals and criminal activity. The unit provides a brief history of how corrections, as a term, came to be used, and the focus of the system today in helping offenders rebuild their lives. The three branches within corrections, facilities, and programs operating at the local, state, and federal levels, are further explored.
Impact of Laws on the Corrections Service: Unit 2 focuses on the law, and how it and its interpretation historically have mandated changes to corrections policies and procedures. Bill of Rights amendments, intervention or restrictions on intervention of the different branches of the CJS, and landmark Supreme Court cases involving prison conditions and prisoners’ rights are also explored. Students gain a working knowledge of the relationship between federal and state laws, societal changes in interpretation of rights, actual events that changed policy, and the reasons behind adjustments to conditions inside facilities.
Effective Communications and Ethical Staff Conduct: Unit 3 examines effective communication skills and techniques, and why they are important in corrections work. Communicating effectively utilizes various methods of speaking, listening, observation, and special services and aids for special disabilities. Corrections staff is trained in communications appropriate for different situations, incidents, and person. Effective communication can avert crises, prevent incidents, and resolve hostage crises. Students examine and test their own communications skills.
High Liability in Corrections Services: Use of Force, Crisis and Emergency Responses: Unit 4 takes a close look at the law, policy, procedure, and examples requiring the use of force.
Security Facilities, and Computer Forensics: This unit examines safety and security in corrections environments, and how risk-management policy and procedures avoid incidents, security breaches, emergencies, and illegal activities.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Course Length: Semester

Transportation and Tours for the Traveler

Transportation and Tours for the Traveler

This course looks at transportation and package tours. During this course, students will learn about the package tour industry today, the travel industry professionals, and the package tour customers. Students will find out who tour operators must work with to create travel products and what kinds of decisions they must make in terms of meal, lodging, attractions, and, of course, transportation. You will read about how a tour operator plans and markets a tour and discover what happens before the tour, during the tour, and after the tour. Finally, students will learn about how technology, events such as 9/11 and the global recession, and increased environmental awareness are affecting the travel industry today. By focusing on all the different components that go into creating a tour, you will be able to get a sense of what working for a tour operator entails as well as what other careers are available in the tour industry. Having this perspective will help you better understand the process you undergo as you plan your own vacations and give you the background to feel comfortable entering the tour industry.

  • Who’s Who in the Tour Business: This unit begins by exploring the history of package tours and transportation as it relates to tours, what exactly a package tour is, and the profile of customers who take tours. It also introduces students to the travel industry profession, which ranges from tour operations who create travel packages to travel agents, who resell travel products and advise customers.
  • Suppliers: This unit begins with discussions about supplier-tour operator dynamics and how tour operators work with attractions, dining, and accommodation suppliers. It also helps students understand the vital role of transportation, ranging from cars to trains. The unit also offers insight into yield management, load factor, and break-even points, all of which are important factors in the business of travel. Finally, the unit also introduces students to the cruise industry, including how it started, and the advantages and disadvantages for tour operators and consumers.
  • Researching and Designing the Tour: This unit is all about the tour experience, including planning itineraries, pacing, and logistical issues such as moving a tour group from one point to the next. It also offers insight into negotiating with suppliers, and discusses budgets, costs, and pricing for package travel.
  • Selling the Tour: Marketing is the focus in this unit. It helps students understand the role of research, the marketing plan, and marketing promotions. It also covers the primary promotional tools, which are advertising, sales promotions, and public relations. Specific kinds of marketing are also investigated, such as direct marketing, marketing to preformed groups, and the tour brochure.
  • On the Tour and Beyond: This unit covers how tour operators prepare customers for the tour, and takes a detailed look at the tour director and his or her roles as well as the logistical issues the director faces daily. It also covers what happens after a tour is over, current issues in transportation and tours, and careers paths in the tour industry.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Hospitality & Tourism
Course Length: Semester

Sustainable Service Management for Hospitality and Tourism

Sustainable Service Management for Hospitality and Tourism

This comprehensive course will cover the principles and practices of sustainable service management. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of socially, environmentally, and financially sustainable hospitality management. The course will provide a sustainable approach to service management, incorporating the role of the customer, employee, leaders, and the environment. After successful completion of this course, students will understand and be able to explain the fundamentals of sustainability in the hospitality industry.

Objectives

  • Articulate the importance of customer-centered service in the hospitality industry
  • Know how to empower employees to create sustainable service
  • Be able to describe leadership qualities that contribute to a sustainable service environment
  • Be able to identify drivers of sustainable success in service businesses
  • Understand how green policies and social profit benefit the planet and the bottom line

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Hospitality & Tourism
Course Length: Semester

Planning Meetings and Special Events

Planning Meetings and Special Events

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of planning meetings and special events. Being a meetings and special events planner is both demanding and rewarding. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects this profession will grow by 43.7 percent between 2010 and 2020. It's not all fun and parties, though. In 2012, Career Cast ranked being an event planner as the sixth most stressful job, with soldiers and firefighters holding the top two positions. That's because a meeting coordinator is responsible for every detail of an event. Planners must know how to communicate, be empathetic, and think of their clients. It's crucial to remember that in some instances the event will be a once-in -a-lifetime occasion, so it's important to get it right.

  • The Big Business of Meetings and Special Events: This unit offers an historical overview of the meetings and special events industry and how it has grown to be an annual $273 billion industry in America. It also reviews different types of meetings and helps students learn to communicate with those in the convention and visitor industry. Students will also learn about committees, supervision styles, and how to set up work schedules.
  • It All Comes Down to the Plan: This unit, students become familiar with definitions needed to work in this industry, and why it is so important to lay the foundation for a meeting or special event. Students will also start to develop a network and became familiar with the professional associations. The tools of the meetings and special event planner trade are also reviewed: smartphones, iPad, computers, and the Internet. Finally, students will learn about developing budgets.
  • Getting Organized: This unit is all about getting organized. In this part of the course, students will work through topics such as site selection and how to map meeting room space using the latest apps. Students will also understand how to work with suppliers, and the importance of using precise language and getting everything on paper.
  • F & B, Equipment and Getting It Out There: Unit Four discusses food and beverage (F & B) and equipment. Students will learn about the different kinds of food set-ups, how to use pipe-and-drape, and the importance of checking everything twice. Students will also learn about working with mass media, and about using the Internet and SEO for promotion.
  • Logistics: This unit the transportation logistics of meetings and international considerations. Students will learn how to organize transportation, monitor shuttle services, and understand airport codes. Students will also gain the knowledge to develop evaluations that will provide valuable feedback to improve future meetings.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Hospitality & Tourism
Course Length: Semester