At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the New York Learning Standards, Core Curriuclum, and Framework.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Scientific Research

Scientific Research

The course Scientific Research describes these activities from the point of view of a professional scientist. While this inside look should appeal to students of all ages, the lessons provide support, accessible ideas, and specific language that do not dumb down the content but rather guide students at their own pace through most of the steps, insights, and experiences they would eventually face if they continue through higher education toward a graduate degree. On the other hand, knowing the practical, everyday basics of scientific thinking and laboratory activity could also serve as a necessary first step to a career as a technician or a lab assistant. While these jobs are hands-on and technical, the intellectual and historical background covered in the course provides an awareness that is essential to working in such an atmosphere.

  • Introduction to Scientific Research and Exploration: In this unit, students will study evidence vs. proof in science, the dynamic vs. static nature of science and scientific discovery, peer-review and “junk science,” scientific journals vs. popular press, and the work of Mendel, Harvey, Fleming, and Florey.
  • The Scientific Method and Scientific Inquiry: Students will investigate the steps of the scientific method and learn how to apply them to answer questions they might have about their world.
  • Designing and Conducting an Experiment: In this unit, students will go through a progressive analysis of converting a research question into an actual, feasible research design. While each major aspect they could encounter will be explained separately, the analysis throughout is focused on practical applications in exemplary situations.
  • The Data: Evaluating Results and Drawing Conclusions: This unit looks at data: how data are collected, analyzed, and evaluated. There is an overview of statistical analysis and the related concept of statistical significance. Very basic statistical tests are covered, including the chi-square test, Student’s t-test, and the use of contingency tables.
  • Reporting your Findings: This unit illustrates the fact that the entire scientific research process is always distilled into a publishable report of a very specific type.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM)
Course Length: Semester

Science and Mathematics in the Real World

Science and Mathematics in the Real World

Science and mathematics are part of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) multi-dimensional strategy that can effectively sustain our twenty-first century knowledge-based economy. STEM careers provide a wide variety of opportunities to understand and address global issues. The most pressing issues of this generation include overpopulation, environmental degradation, pollution, and global warming. These are all subjects of intense and dedicated research by STEM professionals in very diverse fields. In this course, students will focus on how to apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes, and projects that address real world problems, including sustainability and “green” technologies. This course also highlights how science and mathematics and the applications of STEM will be impacted due to the development of a greener economy. The course exposes students to a wide variety of STEM applications and to real world problems from the natural sciences, technology fields, and the world of sports, and emphasizes the diversity of STEM career paths. The importance of math, critical thinking, and mastering scientific and technological skill sets is highlighted throughout. Challenging and enjoyable activities provide multiple opportunities to develop critical thinking skills and the application of the scientific method, and to work on real world problems using STEM approaches.

  • Introduction to Science and Mathematics All Around Us: In Unit 1, students learn about basic scientific and mathematical applications that can be encountered all around us in the real world.
  • Making Connections: Math and Science in Context: In Unit 2, students learn about the use of mathematics as a technological tool and the role of science in our environment, as reflected in the variety of problems, fields, and approaches that characterize the STEM fields.
  • Designing and Conducting an Experiment: In this unit, students will go through a progressive analysis of converting a research question into an actual, feasible research design. While each major aspect they could encounter will be explained separately, the analysis throughout is focused on practical applications in exemplary situations.
  • The Data: Evaluating Results and Drawing Conclusions: This unit looks at data: how data are collected, analyzed, and evaluated. There is an overview of statistical analysis and the related concept of statistical significance. Very basic statistical tests are covered, including the chi-square test, Student’s t-test, and the use of contingency tables.
  • Reporting your Findings: This unit illustrates the fact that the entire scientific research process is always distilled into a publishable report of a very specific type.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM)
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to STEM

Introduction to STEM

This course introduces students to the four areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics through an interdisciplinary approach that will increase awareness, build knowledge, develop problem solving skills, and potentially awaken an interest in pursuing a career in STEM. Students will be introduced to the history, fundamental principles, applications, processes, and concepts of STEM. Students will explore some of the great discoveries and innovations in STEM and review and analyze some of the world’s problems that still exist today. Students are introduced to several computer applications used to analyze and present technical or scientific information. They will also gain a higher understanding of the uses for images and measurement in everyday life. Finally, students will explore the kinds of strategies frequently used to solve problems in these disciplines. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to discover their strengths through practical applications and awareness of the various STEM careers.

  • On Whose Shoulders are We Standing? Students learn about the history and importance of STEM education in the United States, the qualities of STEM students, self-assessment and career interest inventory instruments, and some traditional and non-traditional STEM careers. You also learned about the use of outlines and mind maps to plan and manage STEM projects.
  • A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Students explore the use of images to communicate data and STEM careers that utilize imaging. They also learn about STEM careers in graphic design, animation, gaming, and medical imaging. Also covered are careers that implement data and images, such as radiologic technologists, medical equipment repairers, aerospace engineers, atmospheric scientists, and geographers.
  • How Much is Enough? In this unit, students learn about the history of measurement; how measurement was defined by the United States; and the uses, importance, and significance of measurement in STEM.
  • How to be a Detective: Students investigate the scientific method, scientific theories, scientific laws, problem-solving skills, critical thinking skills, and creative thinking methods. They are also introduced to STEM careers that utilize these skills and methods.
  • STEM is Everywhere! In this unit, students explore the different ways that STEM influences politics, sports, art, music, fashion, and law enforcement fields. They also review the duties, responsibilities, education and training requirements, and outlook for various STEM careers relating to politics, sports, art and design, and law enforcement.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM)
Course Length: Semester

Engineering and Product Development

Engineering and Product Development

This course provides an overview of the concepts of product engineering and development. Students will analyze the life cycle of a product to prepare a product for distribution and for target markets. The course begins with building an understanding of the product life cycle, from the initial idea to drafting requirements to using 3-D modeling tools and other design tools. The final unit focuses on assembling the pieces within a project plan to achieve a product and evaluating the plans for a successful product launch. In addition, the course will provide information about the different careers available to students interested in engineering, product development, and project management.

  • Introduction to Engineering and Product Development: Students learn about engineering and the stages of the product development life cycle.
  • Project Charter and Requirements: Students learn about phases in the product development life cycle including entrance and exit criteria and deliverables.
  • Design and 3-D Modeling: Students learn about design, 3-D modeling and engineering design careers.
  • Product Launch: Students explore product launch, implementation plans and preparations for marketing and distribution of a product.
  • Review Full Product Development Life Cycle: Students learn about incorporating the engineering deliverables and components to prepare and assemble a project plan that represents a full product life cycle.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM)
Course Length: Semester

Engineering and Design

Engineering and Design

Engineering and Design is part of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education and career path. By building real-world problem-solving and critical thinking skills, students learn how to innovate and design new products and improve existing products. Students are introduced to the engineering design process to build new products and to the reverse engineering process, which enables engineers to adjust any existing product. Students will also address how fluid power is used by engineers to make difficult maneuvers easier, increasing efficiency and minimizing effects on the environment. Students then identify how engineering and design have a direct impact on the sustainability of our environment and the greening of our economy. Finally, students incorporate the engineering design process, environmental life cycle, and green engineering principles to create a decision matrix to learn how to solve environmental issues.

  • Introduction to Engineering and Design and the Design Process: In this unit, students learn about how design opportunities exist everywhere around them.
  • Fluid Systems: Energy and Power Technologies in Engineering: This unit demonstrates how engineers use fluid systems to transfer power and force from one location to another.
  • Modeling and Sketching: This unit demonstrates that engineering design is a process that involves drawing and modeling to develop solutions to problems within given constraints.
  • Reverse Engineering: This unit introduces the concept of reverse engineering, which is a critical part of the process in the redesign of products.
  • Engineering to Improve Sustainability: This unit explains the importance of the human and global impact of various engineering designs and products.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM)
Course Length: Semester

Career Explorations III

Career Explorations III

The Career Explorations III course is designed to give seventh- and eighth-grade students an opportunity to explore various CTE subjects. Specifically, students will be able to learn about careers involving human-related services.

Each unit introduces one particular field and explains its past, present, and future. The goal is to whet students' appetites for these careers. Students can then explore that career in more detail as a high school student.

Objectives

  • Understand the components of establishing a business.
  • Describe the value of manufacturing to and its impact on American society and economy.
  • Describe the nature and scope of the Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Career Cluster and the role of transportation, distribution, and logistics in society and the economy.
  • Identify skills, abilities, and talents needed for careers in Architecture and Construction and analyze how these relate to interest profiles.
  • Understand what marketing is and its role both within the company and society.

Career Explorations III: Course Requirements

  • Access to the Internet to view various course-related Web sites and conduct research.
  • Access to Microsoft® PowerPoint® or a similar program.
  • Ability to conduct personal interviews for some projects.

State: National
Grade Level: 7, 8
Category: 1Middle School Courses
Course Length: Semester

Keyboarding and Applications

Keyboarding and Applications

Keyboarding and Applications is a semester-long elective that teaches students keyboarding skills, technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits. In this course, students will learn about proper keyboarding technique. Once students have been introduced to keyboarding skill, lessons will include daily practice of those skills. Students will gain an understanding of computer hardware, operating systems, file management, and the Internet. In addition, they will apply their keyboarding skills and create a variety of business documents, including word processing documents and electronic presentations.

Objectives

  • Identify various technologies, current and emerging.•Select the appropriate technology to complete a task.
  • Use the computer's operating system to execute work responsibilities.•Demonstrate proper keyboarding technique.
  • Improve speed and accuracy of keyboarding skills.•Create word-processing documents with columns, graphics, and bulleted lists.
  • Create and deliver an effective presentation following presentation guidelines.
  • Effectively navigate the Internet and search for information.
  • Evaluate a Web site in terms of reliability.
  • Demonstrate communication skills for obtaining and conveying information.
  • Send and receive information using electronic mail, following appropriate guidelines.     

Keyboarding and Applications Course Requirements

  • word-processor software
  • presentation softwareKeyboarding

State: National
Grade Level: 6, 7, 8
Category: 1Middle School Courses
Course Length: Semester

English IV

English IV

01004 NY

By English IV, students have repeatedly peered through the window to humanity that literature has opened for them. Through it, they have gained valuable perspective on their world, past and present. Close-textual interaction with literature should have heightened appreciation for those texts, improved critical and analytical skills in reading and writing, enhanced speaking and listening abilities, and enriched students' academic and personal vocabulary. This course is organized chronologically, so students can see the influences on and evolution of the ideas and forms. Writing, research, and speaking assignments will continue to focus on formulating and expressing ideas and arguments about the readings. Particular emphasis is placed on gaining critical perspective on the relationship between content and form and on synthesizing ideas into clear and concise prose and presentations.

To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. In English language arts, that critical content is both rigorous and relevant and includes high-quality contemporary works as well as the classics of literature. In English language arts, that content includes classic myths and stories from around the world, America's founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Students will be enriched as they expand their skills and confidence in English language arts through a comprehensive study.

Goals for this course include:

  • Refining reading skills: summary, annotation, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation

  • Identifying explicit and implicit meaning in European literature and philosophy

  • Analyzing a text from multiple perspectives (historical, literary, psychological, religious, philosophical)

  • Comparing and contrasting the treatment of a similar theme or topic in two or more works

  • Analyzing literary elements: narrative/poetic/dramatic structure, point of view, theme, allegory, satire, character

  • Analyzing language: figurative language, tone, syntax, connotation, nuance, power, beauty

  • Analyzing informational/philosophical texts: central ideas, key terms, interaction of ideas, point of view, purpose

  • Analyzing arguments: rhetoric, claim development, structure, purpose

  • Refining writing skills:

    • explanatory: responding to literature

    • argumentative: making a claim, supporting a claim, using valid reasoning, sequencing ideas, adapting to purpose, audience and task, using precise, domain-specific language, using the writing process

  • Refining research skills: web searches, challenging usage and vocabulary, evaluating credibility, reliability, validity,

  • Participating in speaking and listening activities: listening to and analyzing speeches, evaluating a speaker's point of view and reasoning, collaborating with peers, addressing alternate or opposing views in discussions, structuring ideas to be presented appropriate to audience and purpose, adapting speech to audience and purpose, speaking clearly in formal tone, using correct grammar and vocabulary

  • Strengthening language skills: conventions, knowledge, vocabulary acquisition and use

State: New York
Grade Level: 12
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English III

English III

01003CC NY

English III is a survey of American Literature and literary culture from its inception through the twentieth century. Students will explore the major literary forms, themes, authors, and periods of American Literature. They will understand how this literature represents the experiences of people native to America, those who immigrated to America, and those who were brought to America against their will. Emphasis is placed on a rhetorical analysis of the literature to determine how authors achieve a particular purpose or effect. Through focused readings, composition, speaking and listening activities, vocabulary study and research, students will continue to build the literacy skills they need to meet the challenges of high school and beyond.

To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. In English language arts, that critical content is both rigorous and relevant and includes high-quality contemporary works as well as the classics of literature. In English language arts, that content includes classic myths and stories from around the world, America's founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Students will be enriched as they expand their skills and confidence in English language arts through a comprehensive study.

State: New York
Grade Level: 11
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

English II

English II

01002 NY

English II students will study literature that spans centuries, continents, and genres. Each of the thematically integrated units encourages close study of this literature and its context. Students will gain valuable cultural insight as they read and write about works depicting the social, personal, religious, and political struggles and triumphs faced by people all over the world and all through history. Students will continue to build their literacy skills by engaging in focused reading, composition, speaking and listening activities, vocabulary study, and research. By the end of the course, students will have gained a broader perspective and will be well-prepared to apply that perspective to the study of American Literature in English III.

To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. The content includes classic myths and stories from around the world, America's founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Students will be enriched as they expand their skills and confidence in English language arts through a comprehensive study.

State: New York
Grade Level: 10
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year