At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the New York Learning Standards, Core Curriuclum, and Framework.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

U.S. History and Government

U.S. History and Government

This yearlong course discusses the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the course of modern American history. Throughout the course, students will learn about a variety of topics, including:

  • Colonization in America

  • The American Revolution

  • The foundations of the American form of government

  • National expansion in the United States

  • The emergence of sectionalism

  • The emergence of slavery

  • Different regional lifestyles in the United States

  • Industrialization and economic expansion in the United States

  • The Civil War, World War I, World War II, and various regional military conflicts

  • The Great Depression and the New Deal

  • Major cultural and social movements in the United States

  • Important events in contemporary America

After completing the course, students should be able to answer a variety of questions relating to American History and demonstrate social studies skills.

Student objectives include:

  • Understand American colonization and its lasting impact on the developing nation.

  • Identify fundamental thoughts and ideas found in the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

  • Describe American national expansion.

  • Explain the cause and effects of a variety military conflicts beginning with the American Revolution and ending with the conflict in Iraq.

  • Identify the characteristics of the Industrial Revolution in the United States.

  • Describe isolationism, nationalism, and imperialism.

  • Compare and contrast major cultural and social changes throughout American history.

  • Understand the major events of the Cold War.

  • Describe the major issues affecting nations today, including globalization, population growth, and immigration.

  • Demonstrate scholarly writing, critical thinking, and reasoning skills.

  • Understand the difference between primary and secondary sources.

State: New York
Grade Level: 11
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

U.S. Government - Comprehensive

U.S. Government - Comprehensive

04151 NY

This semester-long course discusses types of governments, focusing on the American form of government. Throughout the course, students will learn about a variety of topics. Topics in this course include:

  • International governments

  • Philosophers who influenced the development of government

  • A history of different types of government

  • The rise of democracy

  • The structure and organization of the United States government

  • The importance of the U.S. Constitution

  • The three branches of government

  • How bills become law

  • American political parties

  • Voting and elections

  • Citizenship and civic responsibilities

After completing the course, students should be able to answer a variety of questions relating to government and demonstrate a number of social studies skills.

OBJECTIVES

  • Understand the history of government

  • Answer the question "What is the American form of government?"

  • Understand the importance of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights

  • Identify the importance of checks and balances

  • Understand how candidates are nominated and elected to public office

  • Understand the importance of voting and civic responsibility

  • Using social studies terminology appropriately.

  • Transforming information from one form to another.

  • Demonstrating scholarly writing and critical thinking skills.

State: New York
Grade Level: 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

Social Studies 8

Social Studies 8

54438 NY

Students in Social Studies (grade 8) will explore geography and the history of the United States up to the modern era. Students will be introduced to various study methods, including primary and secondary sources. Topics in this course include:

  • Reconstruction

  • U.S. expansion

  • The effects of the Industrial Revolution

  • Immigration and U.S. isolation

  • The Depression and how the U.S. recovered

  • World Wars

  • The struggle for equality

  • Modern U.S. changes

After completing the course, students should be able to answer a variety of economic questions and demonstrate social studies skills.

OBJECTIVES

  • Answer the question "How has the United States changed since the Civil War?"

  • Understand the importance of industrial progress.

  • Identify social reformers who improved lives for many workers.

  • Understand how the Great Depression happened and how the U.S. recovered.

  • Explain the United States' change from isolationism to worldwide involvement in multiple wars.

  • Analyze the culture of the 60s and the Vietnam War.

  • Demonstrate scholarly writing, critical thinking, and reasoning skills

  • Understand the difference between primary and secondary sources.

State: New York
Grade Level: 8
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

Social Studies 7

Social Studies 7

54437 NY

Students in Social Studies 7 will explore geography and the history of the United States up to the modern era. Students will be introduced to various study methods, including primary and secondary sources. They will study geography and early history of the United States. Students will examine the development of America's independence and the struggle of a nation divided during the Civil War. Topics in this course include:

  • An introduction to social studies and geography

  • Colonialism

  • Imperialism

  • Lifestyles of colonists

  • Declaring independence from England

  • U.S. expansion

  • The Civil War and Reconstruction

After completing the course, students should be able to answer a variety of economic questions and demonstrate social studies skills.

OBJECTIVES

  • Answer the question "How has geography affected settlement patterns?"

  • Understand the importance of exploration.

  • Identify explorers who led to the colonizing of the Americas.

  • Describe the colonial lifestyle.

  • Explain the importance colonists placed on being represented in government and the ultimate declaration of independence from England.

  • Explain the reasons for the division between the North and the South.

  • Analyze the causes and effects of the Civil War, including Reconstruction.

State: New York
Grade Level: 7
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year

Language Arts 600

Language Arts 600

In Language Arts 600, students will delve into texts that span the genres of narrative fiction, poetry, literary nonfiction, and informational texts to build reading, writing and thinking skills. Students will also develop their writing skills as they focus on the six traits while producing narrative, argumentative, and explanatory compositions, as well as creative pieces including poetry. The course concludes with students completing a full research report. 

With a strong emphasis on close reading instruction, writing and thinking activities, as well as speaking and listening tasks, this course will help students expand their understanding of literature while building 21st century skills. Multimedia and interactive elements are built into every lesson to ensure a high-level of student engagement. English 600 students will be enriched as they expand their skills and confidence in English language arts through a comprehensive study that includes the following units:

  • Unit 1: Compare characters in both literature and informational text to build on reading strategies and further develop skills in both grammar and writing
  • Unit 2: Understand mood and character types and learn how characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution in different text types including drama and epic poetry
  • Unit 3: Justify the power of words and analyze how authors use language to communicate ideas in varied poetry forms and explanatory essays
  • Unit 4: Analyze exposition in both fiction and non-fiction text and compare and contrast texts from different genres in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics
  • Unit 5: Identify argument and specific claims found in news media, distinguish facts from opinion, as well as identifying bias, propaganda, and fallacies
  • Unit 6: Identify argument, claims and evidence by completing a close read of nonfiction texts and complete an in-depth, multi-unit formal writing project on an argumentative essay
  • Unit 7: Learn that important issues, such as civil rights and environmentalisms can be looked at from different perspectives and integrate information presented in different media and formats to develop a coherent understanding on a complex topic
  • Unit 8: Explain that research and inquiry deepen understanding on topics and complete an in-depth, multi-unit formal research project answering an essential question

State: National
Grade Level: 6
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

Language Arts 500

Language Arts 500

Language Arts 500 continues to build on the sequential development and integration of language arts skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Special attention is placed on reading non-fiction texts. Students identify text features and explain how graphic elements lead to comprehension and continue to build grammar skills in support of clear communication. Speaking skills are built upon in this course through memorization and recitation of the powerful Gettysburg Address. Students also learn what good communication is and how to practice this in all areas of their lives.

This course specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

  • Unit 1: Demonstrate active reading strategies to find the main idea and analyze meaning of academic words and use sound patterns and syllable patterns to read fluently
  • Unit 2: Engage with and identify features of nonfiction text and form a historical understanding of the Gettysburg Address and recite it from memory
  • Unit 3: Understand the components of language and how to use them effectively in writing and presenting information with public speaking in addition to understanding how the English language has changed over time
  • Unit 4: Explain metacognitive skills to use before, during, and after reading and write a descriptive paragraph, an opinion piece, and a report
  • Unit 5: Read and evaluate stories, using summarizing skills and comparing and contrasting two different texts and follow the writing process to write a narrative
  • Unit 6: Use comprehension skills while reading poems to compare/contrast and analyze different types of poetry, identify poetic ideas and devices, and write poems using a variety of formats
  • Unit 7: Use a variety of comprehension skills in order to understand texts and formulate questions and participate in discussions
  • Unit 8: Use knowledge of the parts of speech to identify and analyze parts of a sentence, as well as analyzing and writing fables
  • Unit 9: Summarize information presented in diverse media and formats, interpret information presented in biographies, and construct a report that incorporates facts and opinions

State: National
Grade Level: 5
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

Language Arts 400

Language Arts 400

Language Arts 400 focuses on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will continue to build fluency and independent reading skills by further developing comprehension strategies via a wide variety of genres including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will write for a variety of genres, include fictional stories, poetry, and informational text, using a more complex paragraph structure and integrated application of their speaking skills.

This course specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

  • Unit 1: Use a variety of comprehension strategies as they read poetry, prose, and fictional texts to create outlines and plan and deliver oral instructions
  • Unit 2: Use various comprehension strategies to think about reading and study the elements of poetry in order to analyze and write poems
  • Unit 3: Apply knowledge of word parts to make meaning and use comprehension strategies to read poetry, and identify elements of word play
  • Unit 4: Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry as well as identify and create sentences with correct form and grammar
  • Unit 5: Write grammatically correct sentences and paragraphs including an opinion paragraph, a persuasive text, and a descriptive story
  • Unit 6: Apply comprehension strategies, especially as they relate to distinguishing fact from opinion to write an opinion paragraph, a letter, and a summary and learn effective ways of public speaking
  • Unit 7: Analyze and replicate different forms of literature, including biographies, fables, parables, and tall tales
  • Unit 8: Identify complex parts of speech in sentences and use inferencing skills and textual evidence in media, literary characters, and cause and effect
  • Unit 9: Apply strategies to monitor and adjust comprehension in fictional stories and works of historical fiction and research and write an informational report

State: National
Grade Level: 4
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

Spelling 600

Spelling 600

In the sixth-grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will practice phonics skills including vowel pairs and diagraphs. Course units also include significant incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. Units include review of Greek and Latin roots, compound words, and homophones. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension. 

Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course, or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. Lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics for clear assessment.

State: National
Grade Level: 6
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

Spelling 500

Spelling 500

In the fifth-grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will practice phonics skills including phonograms, compound words, and vowel-consonant-vowel patterns. Course units also include significant incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. Units include review of base and root words, silent words, and homophones. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension.  Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. 

Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course, or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. Lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics for clear assessment.

State: National
Grade Level: 5
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year

Spelling 400

Spelling 400

In the fourth-grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will not only practice phonics skills including vowel combinations and sounding out multisyllabic words, but also incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. Units include review of base and root words, plural nouns, and homophones. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension.

Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. Lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics for clear assessment.

State: National
Grade Level: 4
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Year