At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the New Jersey College and Career Ready Standards, Student Learning Standards, Core Curriculum Content Standards, and Common Core State Standards.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Power, Structural, and Technical Systems

Power, Structural, and Technical Systems

Power, Structural, and Technical Systems provides students with an understanding of the field of agriculture power and will introduce them to concepts associated with producing the food and fiber required to meet today’s and tomorrow’s needs. This understanding gives students the opportunity to explore agriculture machinery, as well as structures and technological concepts.

Students will understand the historical changes in agriculture and how agriculture has changed to meet the needs of the future world population. Students will be introduced to machinery, structures, biotechnology, and ethical and professional standardsapplicable to agriculture power.

Students will understand the technological innovations that have contributed to changing the face of agriculture. Computers and other technological tools have given farmers the ability to utilize precision agriculture. Students will gain an understanding of the professional career opportunities and responsibilities of growers across the country. Additionally, students can learnabout some of the resources available to professionals in the agriculture industry.

  • Unit 1: Introduction to Agriculture Power, Structural, and Technical Systems: In this unit, students learn about equipment and skills necessary in agriculture, as well as safety practices used with agriculture power equipment.
  • Unit 2: Operation and Maintenance of Equipment and Power Systems: In this unit, students learn about equipment operation and maintenance of power equipment used in agriculture.
  • Unit 3: Sources of Power and Engines and Equipment Efficiency and Powertrain: In this unit, students learn about engine-powered tools and how they perform work.
  • Unit 4: Designing, Constructing, and Maintaining Structural Systems: In this unit, students learn about the structures used on farms and for growing crops.
  • Unit 5: Impact and Use of Technologies in Power and Structural Systems: In this unit, students learn about the technology used on modern farms including global positioning systems, smartphones, and use of open data sources to assist farmers in making decisions for production.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
Course Length: Semester

Plant Systems

Plant Systems

Plant Systems is a semester-length high school elective that introduces students to the basics of plant biology, soil science, agriculture, and horticulture, along with the environmental management practices involved in each, including integrated pest management, biotechnology, growth techniques, and crop management. Students will learn the basic parts of a plant, how plants are scientifically classified, and how they interact with water, air, nutrients, and light to undergo the processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Plant reproduction, including pollination, germination, and dispersal of seeds, is also presented.

  • Unit 1: What is Plant Science: This unit serve as an introduction to plant science in terms of plant biology, soil management, basic conservation techniques, as well as the career tracks common in agriculture, horticulture, landscape design, and biotech research.
  • Unit 2: Plant Structure and Function: Unit 2 focuses on the specifics of plant biology and is the most technical unit in the course. Information about plant anatomy briefly introduced in Unit 1 is discussed in more detail, encompassing specifics about flowers and plant reproduction with regard to seeds, pollination, and germination.
  • Unit 3: Crop Management: Unit 3 is divided into chapters on precision agriculture and crop management, mostly as they relate to agriculture.
  • Unit 4: Specialty Crops: Unit 4 focuses more on horticulture, especially as it pertains to greenhouse crops and orchards.
  • Unit 5: Plant Science Careers: The course’s final unit concentrates on careers in the plant sciences. This encompasses a lesson on agricultural economics, which is key to understanding how the agriculture industry affects the U.S. economy as a whole, and by extension the job market for anyone interested in agronomy, horticulture, or landscape design.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

This semester-length high school elective introduces students to the basic scientific principles of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Students will be recognizing and researching plant systems, animal systems, government policy, “green” technologies, agribusiness principles, and sustainability systems.

In this course, students will apply understanding of ecosystems and systems thinking to the management of natural resources to maximize the health and productivity of the environment, agriculture, and communities. Students will also analyze community practice or policy development related to sustainability in agriculture, food, and natural resources.Communicating the impact of “green” and sustainability principles on agriculture, food, and natural resource systems will also be taught through the course, and students will learn to recognize the social, health, environmental, and economic costs and benefits of renewable energy production (e.g., solar, wind, and biofuels) in comparison to non-renewable energies (e.g., coal, oil, and natural gas).

Analyzing energy usage, renewable energy options, and renewable materials options to promote sustainable practices across AFNR will also be part of the course, and students will learn to use "green" technologies and sustainability practices to maintain safe and healthful working environments that sustain the natural environment and promote well-being in the AFNR workplaces.Students will also demonstrate an understanding of "green" and sustainability trends that are influencing processes and markets in AFNR.

Finally, students will apply adaptive ecosystem management to a common pool resource (e.g., an irrigation system or fishing grounds) problem in a manner that addresses ecological (data, models, concepts, understanding, and scientific responsibilities), socioeconomic (values, interests, information, assets, private sector responsibilities), and institutional (law, policies, authority, assets, public sector responsibilities) contexts.

  • Unit 1: Nature and Scope of AFNR and their Role in Society and Economy: In this unit, students will learn about the ways that early societies met the people’s need for food and other items. They will also learn about the development of agriculture and about now disputes over agriculture have led to war as well as how war has led to advances in technology that have benefited agriculture. Students will learn about the development of different agricultural equipment, including wooden and metal plows, and the thresher. Sustainable farming practices will also be investigated, as will the complexity of food distribution systems.
  • Unit 2: Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources and The Environment: In this unit, students will explore ecosystems, food chains, and the important cycles in nature. They will also examine the impacts of damaging those three things, including direct human causes, chemical causes, and physical causes. Demand on natural resources due to population increases will also be explored, as will how advances in technology have had an impact on both agriculture and natural-resource management. Other topics in this unit cover how historical events have made an impact on the agriculture industry in the United States, sustainable agricultural practices, and the impact of the use of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, and rodenticides in agriculture and their regulation by the EPA.
  • Unit 3: Safety and Health in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Systems: Safety in the workplace is the theme of this unit. Students will learn about the powers that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has when it comes to setting guidelines that help ensure a safe working environment, whether it’s a farm field, processing plant, mine, or forest. Students will also learn that workers have rights to safety training and a safe workplace and the ability to exercise their rights without penalty. Students will also explore workplace plans for disasters, such as storms, floods, biological outbreaks, and radiation exposure. Students will also learn about logistics, which is the management of all aspects of moving products from their origin to their destination. They will also explore the federal departments that oversee the transportation of goods.
  • Unit 4: Introduction to Plant Science: The nature and composition of soil and its role in plants is the foundation for lessons in this unit. Students will explore how soil forms and how it’s used. Students will also learn how it can be augmented with fertilizers, and about the composition of fertilizers. Also, in this unit, students will learn about how soil and water can become polluted by both natural and human means, such as agriculture and mining. Students will also explore the parts of plants, and plant reproduction. Plant classification will also be taught, as will the benefits of plants and how they deal with predators.
  • Unit 5: Animal Agriculture: In this unit, students will learn how animals provide, food, companionship and jobs, and that the purpose of the animal agriculture industry is to raise animals to produce meat, milk, eggs, or other dairy products. Students will explore how farmers and governmental agencies can track farm animals to quickly and easily locate the source of contamination or disease caused by contaminated animal products. Taxonomy, a way that scientists classify living things, will also be explored. Students will also learn about animal genetics, cloning, and the human consumption of cloned meat. Animal behavior will also be explored, as will the different ways that animals are confined, whether in pens or in their natural, free-range environment. The impacts of confinement will also be taught. Protection of animals against cruelty will also be discussed, as will how animal waste is dealt with. Finally, students will explore different careers related to animal care and breeding.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
Course Length: Semester

Food Products and Processing Systems

Food Products and Processing Systems

Agriculture, food, and natural resources (AFNR) are central to human survival and civilization. Mankind’s development, use, and stewardship of natural resources to create food products have a long and ever-changing timeline. This course explores the history and evolution of food products, along with the processing methods that have arisen to feed an ever-growing world population.

Students study specifics in a wide spectrum of food product topics, from early methods of preservation to technological advancements in packaging, regulations in labeling, and marketing trends. The course prepares students for a variety of possible educational and career pathways in the food industry. Students learn industry terminology in each area of the overall system, from “farm to fork” to vertical integration to smart packaging.

Food product systems include global and local marketing of whole and processed foods. The course investigates the economic, environmental, and nutritional benefits of the food students are eating in a series of hands-on projects that supplement the studies and assessments. Health concerns and best practices in quality assurance, inspections, and labeling are reviewed. Students learn how dietary guidelines are made and how they change with the latest research. Students track their own food intake and dietary ratios and research ingredients, processing procedures, and safe handling practices to increase their consumer awareness of food products.

Advertising, marketing, product testing, and distribution of food products comprise a huge sector of food product systems and careers. The course prepares students for further research and work experience in these lucrative fields.

  • Unit 1: What is the Food Products and Processing System?: Unit 1 starts the course with an overview of food products and processing from early civilizations to the present. Global markets and marketing needs emerge as constantly changing, and a growing population demands innovations. Methods of cultivation, preservation, preparation, and trade are examined. Key concepts and industry terminology are introduced for further examination in the course.
  • Unit 2: Consumer-Driven Marketing and Food Product Development: Unit 2 focuses on consumer demand and how it shapes food production and processing. Communication of what consumers want drives product development and requires resources: scientists, marketers, engineers, and regulatory agencies as well as food producers and product developers. Consumers may not realize how their demands are being influenced by advertising or marketing; manufacturers who misjudge consumer demand in a new product launch often fail.
  • Unit 3: Nutrition, Food Consumption, and Dietary Trends: Unit 3 focuses on nutrition, food consumption, and dietary trends. What we eat, and how much of each food group we eat, changes with our lifestyles and the prevailing wisdom. The unit examines trends such as whole organic foods as a reaction to nutritional failings of a processed food diet, or the growing consumer demand for gluten-free products. Obesity is another dietary trend that is studied. Portion sizes and weight outcomes are investigated and tracked in projects. The relationship between serving size and portion size nutritional information is discussed. Vocabulary associated with these topics in food is defined. Advertising influences and reactions to dietary trends are also analyzed in this unit.
  • Unit 4: Agribusiness Marketing and Sales: Agribusiness, marketing, and sales are the focus of Unit 4. Students learn the difference between marketing and sales, and how their interrelatedness operates in the global food products industry as well as in a local market economy. Packaging evolution and technologies are important factors in both marketing and sales. Students formulate opinions creatively on the next big thing and how it might be marketed. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), a hot topic, are given a scholarly examination in this unit.
  • Unit 5: Standards, Regulations, and Safe Food Production: Unit 5 examines standards, regulations, and safe food production. Careers in regulatory agencies, inspection, quality assurance, and processing plant management are described. The many steps in food processing that a product may go through from commodity to table include best management practices for safe handling, storage, transportation, packaging, and labeling. Students track safe-handling practices in the home, including hygiene, food storage, handling, and preparation.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
Course Length: Semester

Animal Systems

Animal Systems

The role of animals in civilization has an ancient history, and they are no less prominent in today’s society. For example, pigs were domesticated in China as long as 10,000 years ago and are still vital to our lifestyle today. But we know that pigs are also intelligent beings. What are their preferences for habitat and treatment, and what are their social and reproductive habits?

Animals today are used for clothing, food, transportation, agriculture, herding, companionship, guide assistance, and crime fighting, and research continues to reveal new uses. As our scientific understanding of animal systems grows, so do our best practices, ethical considerations, and research applications. How mankind treats animals impacts their well-being and productivity.

The course provides students with a wealth of information on livestock-management practices, animal husbandry, physiological systems, the latest scientific trends, and innovations in food production.

Changes in practices, regulations, and legislation for animal welfare continue as new research provides solutions to medical, ethical, and practical concerns. The course reviews current topics, such as advancements in technology and research, and defines areas of discussion while maintaining focus on best-management practices. How the research translates to management practices is a vital area of study and discussion.

Objectives

  • Understand the role of animal agriculture in society.
  • Examine and apply best-management practices in animal agriculture.
  • Compare animal welfare versus animal rights.
  • Evaluate and select superior animals to be used for reproductive purposes.
  • Investigate animal-performance data.
  • Explore careers in animal agriculture.
  • Study the environmental impact of animal management and production systems.

Animal Systems Course Requirements
This is an introductory course in animal systems at the high-school level. An interest in animal physiology, husbandry, livestock, veterinary practice, animal welfare, or food production would be desirable for students of the course. The information gained will be helpful in making educational decisions for undergraduate or graduate study. A student might use the knowledge gained from the course to further an interest in becoming a chef, a researcher, a doctor, a wildlife-management professional, or any number of applicable careers. No previous experience in or knowledge of these careers is required for the course.

Some students will have more experiential knowledge of animals; however, hands-on experience is not a requirement. The course covers livestock anatomy, physiology, and reproductive systems, but medical knowledge is not required for the course.

The ability to review online information, research topics independently, pursue hands-on projects, and create reports and presentations is required.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
Course Length: Semester

Agribusiness Systems

Agribusiness Systems

Agribusiness Systems is a semester-length high school elective that introduces the business, management, marketing, and financial skills needed to successfully produce food, fiber, and fuel for domestic and global markets. Nearly 16 percent of total U.S. employment and 14 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product can be attributed to agribusiness systems, which means agriculture, food, and natural resources play a pivotal role in the economic success of our nation.

Students will learn about the components of the agribusiness system and how they interact to deliver food to our tables. They will also learn about the key elements of a successful agribusiness enterprise: economics, financial management, marketing and sales, and government policies and regulations.

Objectives

  • Introduce the components of agribusiness systems.
  • Explain key business and management principles and issues for the agribusiness enterprise.
  • Present an overview of the knowledge and skills needed by agribusiness enterprises.
  • Expose students to career opportunities in agribusiness.
  • Analyze and interpret agricultural policies in relation to their effects on the agribusiness system and agribusiness enterprises.
  • Understand the impact of green practices and sustainability principles on natural resources and how they affect food production.
  • Recognize the need for accurate records and financial practices to maintain a successful agribusiness enterprise.
  • Analyze budgets and forecasts to determine business strategies.
  • Develop interpersonal and communication skills and critical thinking skills that are necessary for a successful career in the constantly changing agribusiness industry.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of global markets, trade policies, and food security and safety issues that affect the agribusiness industry.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
Course Length: Semester

Environmental Science

Environmental Science

Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary course covering a wide variety of topics including biology, physics, geology, ecology, chemistry, geography, astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and engineering. The course also considers ways in which human populations affect our planet and its processes. Of special emphasis is the concept of sustainability as a means of using resources in a way that ensures they will always be around us.

The unifying concepts that tie the different areas of environmental science together are as follows:

  • Science provides a way to learn more about the world and influences how we understand it.
  • Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes.
  • The Earth is one interconnected system.
  • Humans change natural systems.
  • Environmental issues have a cultural and social context.
  • Human existence depends in part on increasing practices that will achieve sustainability.

Students at this level should show development in their understanding of scientific inquiry. The course provides hands-on labs and research to aid in arriving at a deeper understanding of the environment and the impact of humans on it today and in the past. The labs will call upon students to analyze many different processes and systems, arrive at conclusions, and determine ways in which every person can positively influence the environment.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Define environmental science and describe the field of environmental science studies;
  • Identify the other fields of study that contribute to environmental science;
  • Identify ways in which humans depend on the environment;
  • Give examples of renewable and nonrenewable resources and distinguish between them;
  • List the five general causes of environmental degradation;
  • Explain what is meant by sustainability;
  • Define energy;
  • Describe different forms of energy, and give examples of each;
  • Understand energy transformation, energy efficiency, and the law of conservation of energy.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Science
Course Length: Year