At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to the California Content Standards, the California Common Core Content Standards, and the California Next Generation Science Standards.

Odysseyware has 125 courses approved by the University of California and included on the A-G Reference List.

Our digital curriculum is continually recognized for its consistent quality and rigor, with 22 technology courses receiving the ISTE Seal of Alignment for Proficiency and 22 core courses approved by Quality Matters.

Health Education (2435) CA B

Health Education (2435) CA B

This health course provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to make informed, responsible decisions that will assist them in living healthy lifestyles. The objectives and concepts covered in this course develop students’ health literacy by helping them understand and acquire positive personal health habits appropriate to the changing needs of adolescents. Following the California Health Frameworks and guided by the California Healthy Youth Act, this course focuses on four ideas of health literacy:

  • Acceptance of personal responsibility
  • Respect for and promotion of the health of others
  • An understanding of the process of growth and development
  • Informed use of health-related information, products and services

Thus, this course will promote healthy habits, decision-making and self-management skills in regards to students’ physical health, sexual health, social and emotional health, safety and injury prevention, and personal and community health.

CURRICULUM CONTENT AND SKILLS FOCUS: 

UNIT 1: STAYING SAFE

  • Identify ways to stay safe during natural disasters and emergency situations (e.g., landslides, floods, earthquakes, wildfires, electrical storms, winter storms, and terrorist attacks).
  • Analyze emergency preparedness plans for the home, the school, and the community.
  • Examine ways that injuries are caused while traveling to and from school and in the community.
  • Evaluate the risks and responsibilities associated with teen driving and auto accidents.
  • Encourage actions to promote safe driving experiences.
  • Describe procedures for emergency care and lifesaving, including CPR, first aid, and control of bleeding.
  • Demonstrate first aid and CPR procedures.

UNIT 2: HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

  • Identify ways to stay safe during natural disasters and emergency situations (e.g., landslides, floods, earthquakes, wildfires, electrical storms, winter storms, and terrorist attacks).
  • Analyze community resources for disaster preparedness.
  • Identify global environmental issues.
  • Identify ways to reduce pollution and harmful health effects (e.g., by using alternative methods of transportation).
  • Evaluate current research about the health consequences of poor environmental conditions.
  • Apply a decision-making process to a community or environmental health issue.
  • Explain how public health policies and government regulations influence health promotion and disease prevention.
  • Analyze how environmental conditions affect personal and community health.
  • Discuss ways to stay informed about environmental issues.
  • Identify government and community agencies that promote health and protect the environment.
  • Analyze environmental barriers to adopting positive personal health practices and strategies for overcoming the barriers.
  • Describe the dangers of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, lead, asbestos, pesticides, and unclean air and water; and discuss strategies for avoiding exposure.
  • Analyze the social influences that encourage or discourage sun-safety practices.
  • Demonstrate the proper steps for protecting oneself against the harmful effects of the sun.
  • Describe the impact of air and water pollution on health.

UNIT 3: PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE

  • Support personal or consumer health issues that promote community wellness.
  • Encourage societal and environmental conditions that benefit health.
  • Evaluate the benefits of informed health choices.
  • Explain how public health policies and government regulations influence health promotion and disease prevention.
  • Evaluate the benefits to mother, father, and child when teenagers wait until adulthood to become parents.
  • Describe rules and laws intended to prevent injuries.
  • Explain laws related to sexual behavior and the involvement of minors.
  • Access valid information about personal health products and services available in the community.
  • Develop a plan of preventive health management.
  • Evaluate the importance of regular medical and dental checkups, vaccinations, and examinations.
  • Identify symptoms that should prompt individuals to seek health care.
  • Identify types of pathogens that cause disease.
  • Investigate the causes and symptoms of communicable and noncommunicable diseases.
  • Access valid information about common diseases.
  • Discuss the value of actively managing personal health behaviors (e.g., getting adequate sleep, practicing ergonomics, and performing self-examinations).
  • Identify the importance of medical screenings (including breast, cervical, testicular, and prostate examinations, and other testing) necessary to maintain reproductive health.
  • Examine ways to prevent and manage asthma.
  • Evaluate influences on the selection of personal health care products and services.
  • Use effective communication skills to ask for assistance from parents, guardians, and medical or dental health care professionals to enhance health.
  • Explain how decisions regarding health behaviors have consequences for oneself and others.
  • Analyze the possible consequences of risky hygienic and health behaviors and fads (e.g., tattooing, body piercing, sun exposure, and sound volume).
  • Describe the steps involved in breast or testicular self-exams.
  • Develop a plan to prevent injuries during emergencies and natural disasters.
  • Evaluate the safety and effectiveness (including success and failure rates) of FDA-approved condoms and other contraceptives in preventing HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy.
  • Identify why abstinence is the most effective method for the prevention of HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy.
  • Analyze the consequences for the mother and child of using alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs during pregnancy—in cluding fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and other birth defects.
  • Describe the short- and long-term effects of HIV, AIDS, and other STDs.
  • Compare the success and failure rates of FDA-approved condoms and other contraceptives in preventing HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy.
  • Evaluate the risks and consequences associated with sexual activities, including HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy.
  • Use a decision-making process to evaluate the social, emotional, physical, and economic effects of teen pregnancy on the child, the teen parent, the family, and society.
  • Analyze STD rates among teens.
  • Identify local resources concerning reproductive and sexual health, including all FDA-approved contraceptives, HIV/STD testing, and medical care.
  • Analyze the validity of health information, products, and services related to reproductive and sexual health.
  • Advocate the respect for and the dignity of persons living with HIV or AIDS.

UNIT 4: RESPONSIBLE LIVING

  • Describe healthy ways to express caring, friendship, affection, and love.
  • Analyze how interpersonal communication affects relationships.
  • Demonstrate effective communication skills within healthy dating relationships.
  • Recognize potentially harmful or abusive relationships, including dangerous dating situations.
  • Explain the effects of violence on individuals, families, and communities
  • Assess characteristics of harmful or abusive relationships.
  • Evaluate the importance of regular medical and dental checkups, vaccinations, and examinations.
  • Identify symptoms that should prompt individuals to seek health care.
  • Determine personal, family, school, and community factors that can help reduce the risk of engaging in sexual activity.
  • Use a decision-making process to examine barriers to making healthy decisions about relationships and sexual health.
  • Evaluate how growth and development, relationships, and sexual behaviors are affected by internal and external influences.
  • Assess the discrepancies between actual and perceived social norms related to sexual activity among teenagers.
  • Use a decision-making process to evaluate the physical, emotional, and social benefits of abstinence, monogamy, and the avoidance of multiple sexual partners.
  • Use a decision-making process to analyze when it is necessary to seek help with or leave an unhealthy situation.
  • Use effective communication skills for preventing and reporting sexual assault and molestation.
  • Discuss the characteristics of gang members.
  • Analyze why it is risky to belong to a gang.
  • Analyze sources of information and services concerning safety and violence prevention.
  • Analyze the consequences of gang involvement for self, family, and the community.
  • Analyze the consequences of violence for self, family, and the community.
  • Apply strategies to avoid and report dangerous situations, including conflicts involving weapons and gangs.
  • Explain how witnesses and bystanders can help prevent violence by reporting dangerous situations.
  • Use a decision-making process to evaluate the use of FDA-approved condoms and other contraceptives for pregnancy and STD prevention.
  • Identify short- and long-term goals related to abstinence and maintaining reproductive and sexual health, including the use of FDA-approved condoms and other contraceptives for pregnancy and STD prevention.
  • Describe personal actions that can protect sexual and reproductive health (including one’s ability to deliver a healthy baby in adulthood).

UNIT 5: ALCOHOL AND DRUG USAGE

  • Explain the impact of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use on brain chemistry, brain function, and behavior.
  • Describe the use and abuse of prescription and nonprescription medicines and illegal substances.
  • Analyze how using alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs influences health and other behaviors.
  • Predict how a drug-free lifestyle will support the achievement of short- and long-term goals.
  • Participate in activities in the school and community that help other individuals make positive choices regarding the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
  • Present a persuasive solution to the problem of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use among youths.
  • Analyze the consequences for the mother and child of using alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs during pregnancy—including fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and other birth defects.
  • Describe the health benefits of abstaining from or discontinuing use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
  • Explain the connection between alcohol and tobacco use and the risk of oral cancer.
  • Identify the social and legal implications of using and abusing alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
  • Analyze the consequences of binge drinking and its relationship to cancer; to liver, pancreatic, and cardiovascular diseases; and to a variety of gastrointestinal problems, neurological disorders, and reproductive system disorders.
  • Use effective refusal and negotiation skills to avoid riding in a car or engaging in other risky behaviors with someone who has been using alcohol or other drugs.
  • Explain how one’s behavior when traveling as a passenger in a vehicle influences the behavior of others.
  • Interpret school policies and community laws related to alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use, possession, and sale.
  • Clarify myths regarding the scope of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use among adolescents.
  • Evaluate strategies for managing the impact of internal and external influences on alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use.
  • Describe financial, political, social, and legal influences on the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
  • Access information, products, and services related to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
  • Analyze how using alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs influences health and other behaviors

State: California
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Year

Health Education (2435) CA A

Health Education (2435) CA A

This health course provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to make informed, responsible decisions that will assist them in living healthy lifestyles. The objectives and concepts covered in this course develop students’ health literacy by helping them understand and acquire positive personal health habits appropriate to the changing needs of adolescents.

Following the California Health Frameworks and guided by the California Healthy Youth Act, this course focuses on four ideas of health literacy:

  • Acceptance of personal responsibility
  • Respect for and promotion of the health of others
  • An understanding of the process of growth and development
  • Informed use of health-related information, products and services

Thus, this course will promote healthy habits, decision-making and self-management skills in regard to students’ physical health, sexual health, social and emotional health, safety and injury prevention, and personal and community health.

CURRICULUM CONTENT AND SKILLS FOCUS:

UNIT 1: BODY ESSENTIALS

  • Describe the physical, social and emotional changes associated with being a young adult.
  • Execute a plan for maintaining good personal hygiene (including oral hygiene) and getting adequate rest and sleep.
  • Identify ways to prevent situations that might harm vision, hearing or dental health.
  • Identify symptoms that indicate a need for an ear, eye, or dental examination.
  • Develop a plan of preventive dental health management.
  • Explain how conception occurs, the stages of pregnancy and the responsibilities of parenting.
  • Summarize fertilization, fetal development and childbirth.
  • Analyze the impact of nutritional choices on future reproductive and prenatal health.
  • Describe nutrition practices that are important for the health of a pregnant woman and her baby.
  • Explain responsible prenatal and prenatal care and parenting, including California’s Safely Surrendered Baby Law.

UNIT 2: PROPER NUTRITION

  • Evaluate internal and external influences that affect food choices.
  • Access sources of accurate information about safe and healthy weight management.
  • Distinguish between facts and myths regarding nutrition practices, products, and physical performance.
  • Evaluate various approaches to maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Research and discuss the practical use of current research-based guidelines for a nutritionally balanced diet.
  • Explain the importance of variety and moderation in food selection and consumption.
  • Describe dietary guidelines, food groups, nutrients, and serving sizes for healthy eating habits.
  • Describe the relationship between poor eating habits and chronic diseases such as heart disease, obesity, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and osteoporosis.
  • Analyze the relationship between physical activity and overall health.
  • Use a decision-making process to plan nutritionally adequate meals at home and away from home.
  • Demonstrate how to use safe food handling procedures when preparing meals and snacks.
  • Develop practical solutions for removing barriers to healthy eating and physical activity.
  • Create a personal nutrition and physical activity plan based on current guidelines.
  • Select healthy foods and beverages in a variety of settings.
  • Critique one’s personal diet for overall balance of key nutrients.
  • Identify strategies for eating more fruits and vegetables.
  • Describe how to take more personal responsibility for eating healthy foods.
  • Participate in school and community activities that promote fitness and health.
  • Explain how to keep food safe through proper food purchasing, preparation, and storage practices.
  • Describe the prevalence, causes, and long-term consequences of unhealthy eating.
  • Assess personal barriers to healthy eating and physical activity.
  • Describe community programs and services that help people gain access to affordable, healthy foods.
  • Describe internal and external influences that affect physical activity.
  • Advocate enhanced nutritional options in the school and community.
  • Identify the causes, symptoms, and harmful effects of eating disorders.
  • Analyze positive strategies to communicate healthy eating and physical activity needs at home, at school, and in the community.
  • Explain why people with eating disorders need professional help.

UNIT 3: PHYSICAL HEALTH

  • Distinguish between facts and myths regarding nutrition practices, products, and physical performance.
  • Analyze the impact of various influences, including the environment, on eating habits and attitudes toward weight management.
  • Analyze the harmful effects of using diet pills and anabolic steroids.
  • Evaluate the accuracy of claims about food and dietary supplements.
  • Evaluate the accuracy of claims about the safety of fitness products.
  • Explain the physical, academic, mental, and social benefits of physical activity and the relationship between a sedentary lifestyle and chronic disease.
  • Analyze internal and external influences that affect physical activity.
  • Describe the amounts and types of physical activity recommended for teenagers’ overall health and for the maintenance of a healthy body weight.
  • Evaluate the need for rest, sleep, and exercise.
  • Discuss ways to reduce the risk of injuries that can occur during athletic and social activities.
  • Analyze internal and external influences that affect physical activity.
  • Practice injury prevention during athletic, social, and motor vehicle-related activities.
  • Encourage peers to use safety equipment during physical activity.
  • Assess one’s personal nutrition needs and physical activity level.

UNIT 4: SOCIAL AND MENTAL HEALTH

  • Describe the importance of recognizing signs of disordered eating and other common mental health conditions.
  • Analyze signs of depression, potential suicide, and other self-destructive behaviors.
  • Analyze the internal and external issues related to seeking mental health assistance.
  • Access school and community resources to help with mental, emotional, and social health concerns.
  • Describe qualities that contribute to a positive self-image.
  • Use a decision-making process to analyze the benefits of respecting individual differences in growth and development, physical appearance, gender roles, and sexual orientation.
  • Practice respect for individual differences and diverse backgrounds.
  • Object appropriately to teasing of peers and community members that is based on perceived personal characteristics and sexual orientation.
  • Support the needs and rights of others regarding mental and social health.
  • Demonstrate conflict resolution skills to avoid potentially violent situations.
  • Describe California laws regarding bullying, sexual violence, and sexual harassment.
  • Analyze the laws regarding and detrimental effects of sexual harassment.
  • Classify personal stressors at home, in school, and with peers.
  • Monitor personal stressors and assess techniques for managing them.
  • Compare various coping mechanisms for managing stress.
  • Evaluate how preventing and managing stress and getting help for mental and social problems can help a person achieve short- and long-term goals.
  • Set a goal to reduce life stressors in a health-enhancing way.
  • Assess personal patterns of response to stress and use of resources.
  • Practice effective coping mechanisms and strategies for managing stress.
  • Evaluate the need for rest, sleep, and exercise.

UNIT 5: HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

  • Assess ways to be a responsible consumer of health products and services.
  • Apply a decision-making process to a personal health issue or problem.
  • Encourage and support safe, respectful, and responsible relationships.
  • Analyze the role of individual, family, community, and cultural norms on the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
  • Assess situations that could lead to pressure for sexual activity and to the risk of HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy.
  • Support others in making positive and healthful choices about sexual behavior.
  • Describe physical, social, and emotional changes associated with being a young adult.
  • Discuss influences that affect positive health practices.
  • Recognize that there are individual differences in growth and development, physical appearance, gender roles, and sexual orientation.
  • Evaluate laws related to sexual involvement with minors.
  • Demonstrate effective negotiation skills for avoiding dangerous and risky situations.
  • Practice how to refuse less-nutritious foods in social settings.
  • Apply a decision-making process to avoid potentially dangerous situations.
  • Use effective coping strategies when faced with various social situations involving the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
  • Practice setting personal boundaries in a variety of situations.
  • Seek help from trusted adults for oneself or a friend with an emotional or social health problem.
  • Identify loss and grief.
  • Identify warning signs for suicide.
  • Discuss suicide-prevention strategies.
  • Participate in clubs, organizations, and activities in the school and in the community that offer opportunities for student and family involvement.
  • Discuss healthy ways to respond when you or someone you know is grieving.
  • Analyze the qualities of healthy peer and family relationships.
  • Promote a positive and respectful environment at school and in the community.
  • Describe healthy ways to express caring, friendship, affection, and love.
  • Describe the benefits of having positive relationships with trusted adults.
  • Discuss the characteristics of healthy relationships, dating, committed relationships, and marriage.
  • Describe how social environments affect health and well-being.
  • Demonstrate assertive communication skills to resist pressure to use alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
  • Use a decision-making process to evaluate how the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs affects individuals, families, and society.
  • Demonstrate how nutritional needs are affected by age, gender, activity level, pregnancy, and health status.
  • Explain healthy alternatives to alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use.
  • Educate family and peers about choosing healthy foods.

State: California
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Health
Course Length: Year

Essentials of Mathematics

Essentials of Mathematics

Essentials of Mathematics is a semester-length review of the fundamentals taught in Pre-Algebra, Algebra I and Geometry courses and is useful at the high school level for basic skill remediation and/or practice necessary to prepare for a state exam. The course highlights basic mathematical skills through multiple review, practice and sample exam questions. 

Upon successfully completing the course, the student should have mastered the following concepts:

  • Understand and know how to compute and define rational numbers
  • Perform basic operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with fractions, decimals, and percent’s
  • Apply basic fundamental rules of exponents as well as scientific notation
  • Be able to construct basic and complex geometric shapes; solve for perimeter, area, surface area, and volume
  • Use inductive and deductive reasoning, conjectures, and estimation necessary to construct a picture, formula or equation needed for analyzing and solving algebraic and geometric word problems involving basic probability and statistical reasoning, scale factor, graphic representation of quantities, and linear systems of equations
  • Solve single variable, absolute value, and linear systems of equations
  • Evaluate, solve, and graph linear functions as well as conceptualize the relationship between the independent and dependent variable of a function
  • Simplify and perform operations with radical expressions and polynomials
  • Understand and know how to apply the slope-intercept form of a line, slope formula, and Pythagorean theorem

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Test Prep

Essentials of Language Arts

Essentials of Language Arts

Essentials of Language Arts is a semester-length review of the fundamentals of reading informational and literary texts, and writing a variety of creative and expository compositions. This course is useful at the high school level for basic conceptual and skill remediation, and/or practice necessary to prepare for a state exam.

Upon successfully completing the course, the student should have mastered the following concepts and skills:

Informational Texts

  • Recognize the elements and characteristics of different kinds of informational texts: expository, procedural, persuasive, and literary nonfiction.
  • Navigate, interpret, and evaluate informational texts.
  • Identify and analyze the author’s purpose in a variety of informational texts.
  • Understand and use the conventions of workplace documents and business writing.
  • Distinguish and analyze claims in informational texts (main idea, topics, evidence, etc.).
  • Use knowledge of literal and figurative language and context clues to determine the meaning of unknown words.
  • Understand and analyze the organizational pattern of informational texts.
  • Examine the use of visual elements that support written texts.
  • Draw reasonable inferences from informational texts.
  • Identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments.

II. Literary Texts

  • Recognize the elements and characteristics of different literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction.
  • Recognize and analyze the structure of poetry, drama, and narrative prose.
  • Draw inferences from explicit and implicit information.
  • Identify and analyze elements of literary texts: plot, setting, characterization, theme.
  • Identify and analyze literary devices: imagery, tone, point of view, flashback, foreshadowing, figurative language.
  • Understand the influence of culture, history, and an author’s background on diction, style, and elements of narrative fiction.

III. Writing

  • Understand and apply the writing process.
  • Recognize and compose a clear thesis statement.
  • Recognize and evaluate organizational patterns for an essay.
  • Identify and analyze evidence for relevance to a topic or argument.
  • Understand and use evidence to support claims and arguments.
  • Identify and select meaningful, descriptive, and expressive words.
  • Recognize, use, and evaluate effective grammar, sentence construction, clause coordination, agreement, number, tense, word choice, mechanics, and conventions.
  • Write a business letter.
  • Write a literary analysis.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: English Language Arts
Course Length: Test Prep

Probability and Statistics B

Probability and Statistics B

Semester B of Probability and Statistics is designed to give 11th- and 12th-grade students a more in-depth look at statistics and its many applications, with an emphasis on inferential statistics. Students are also introduced to advanced counting techniques as well as probability and its applications.

The semester begins with the concept of sample space, basic probability, and the difference between theoretical and experimental probabilities. A more in-depth look at probability follows, with an emphasis on compound and conditional probabilities.

Students explore normal data distributions and its properties, followed by a look at the standard normal distributions and its usefulness as a probability model for making inferences about a population. The remainder of the semester is devoted to hypothesis testing using various significance tests such as 1- and 2-sample z-tests, 1- and 2-sample t-tests, significance tests involving proportions, and chi-square goodness of fit tests. Hypothesis testing is then put into practice through a variety of real-world of applications and projects.

Each of the five units in Semester B includes twelve lessons and one project. Each lesson has a minimum of thirteen formativeassessment questions to enable students and their teacher to gauge student understanding. Summative assessments include three quizzes in each unit, a test for each unit, and a semester exam covering all five units. Each project uses concepts covered in the unit.

  • Unit 1: Determine theoretical and experimental probabilities using probability rules and determine if two events are independent.
  • Unit 2: Identify mutually exclusive and non-mutually exclusive events, determine binomial probabilities, and calculate expected value.
  • Unit 3: Use permutations and combinations to calculate probabilities and apply the properties of normally distributed data. 
  • Unit 4: Understand the central limit theorem, determine confidence intervals, and use hypothesis testing to compare proportions and means, and to determine the relationship between categorical variables.
  • Unit 5: Distinguish between parametric and non-parametric statistics and apply these concepts to examine topics including health science and market research.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Semester

Probability and Statistics A

Probability and Statistics A

Semester A of Probability of Statistics is designed to give 11th- and 12th-grade students an overview of basic concepts of statistics, with an emphasis on descriptive statistics. The semester begins with the key concepts of data, samples, and populations. Students will create visual representations of data sets, such as histograms and bar graphs. Students will describe the central tendency and spread of data for a data set.  Students will look for patterns in a data set and determine models based on those patterns.

Each of the five units includes twelve lessons and one project. Each lesson has a minimum of thirteen formative assessment questions to enable students and their teacher to gauge student understanding. Summative assessments include three quizzes in each unit, a test for each unit, and a semester exam covering all five units. Each project uses concepts covered in the unit.

  • Unit 1: Describe the types of statistics, types of data, types of studies, and sampling methods.
  • Unit 2: Create visual representations of data sets using dot plots, stem-and-leaf displays, scatter plots, and find the model that best represents the data.
  • Unit 3: Describe the central tendency of a data set using various measures.
  • Unit 4: Describe the dispersion of a data set using both numerical measures and visual representations.
  • Unit 5: Apply concepts learned in this lesson to a variety of real world applications.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Semester

Probability and Statistics A/B End of Course Review and Test

Probability and Statistics A/B End of Course Review and Test

Unit 1: Probability and Statistics A/B End of Course Review and TestAssignments 

  • Probability and Statistics A/B Course Review
  • Probability and Statistics A/B End of Course Test
  • Alternate Probability and Statistics A/B End of CourseTest*

(*) Indicates alternative assignment

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Math
Course Length: Year

Civics

Civics

This Civics course is designed to give students an overview of   all aspects of U.S. government and what it means to be a U.S. citizen. Students will define civics, politics, and government and then explore the basic principles, purposes, and types of government. Students will take a deeper dive into the foundations of U.S. government by examining the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights, and other amendments. Students will also analyze the three branches of government, federalism, civic rights and liberties, and the role of political parties and interest groups. They will take a global perspective by examining foreign affairs, including U.S. foreign policy, other nation’s political structures and foreign policies, the relationship between the United States and other countries, as well as international organizations. They will examine the meaning of citizenship, including who is a U.S. citizen, how people become citizens, and citizens’ privileges, rights, and responsibilities. Students will also analyze civic participation and civic virtue by studying historical and contemporary examples of how citizens influenced the government.

Each lesson features formative assessments that gauge students’ understanding of the material presented in the lesson. Mid-way and at the end of each unit, there is a summative quiz that covers the content prior to it. At the end of each unit, there is a review lesson before the unit test. In each unit, there are two projects that may require students to conduct research, synthesize information, and write essays. Finally, at the end of the course, there is a final exam.

  • Unit 1: Describe the basic principles, types, and purposes of government with an introduction to the concept of a constitution, the U.S. Constitution, and the structure of federalism
  • Unit 2: Explain the factors that influenced U.S. government and American society with a closer look at government structures at the national, state, and local level, as well as American political culture
  • Unit 3: Examine the three branches of government, how public policy is created, the powers of state and local governments, individual rights, and political parties
  • Unit 4: Analyze foreign affairs, including the U.S. relationship with other nations and global contemporary politics
  • Unit 5: Explain citizenship, the rights of citizens, and civic virtue

State: National
Grade Level: 8
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Year