At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to Arkansas' Academic Standards and Curriculum Framework.

Introduction to Careers in Arts, A/V Technology, and Communications

Introduction to Careers in Arts, A/V Technology, and Communications

This introductory course provides comprehensive information on five separate areas of arts and communications as potential educational and career pathways. Students who are interested in careers across a broad spectrum of professional positions, including fine artist, telecommunications administrator, magazine editor, broadcast journalist, or computer graphics artist, will gain useful perspective on industry terminology, technology, work environment, job outlook, and guiding principles.

  • Unit 1: Audio/Video Technology and Film: Unit 1 focuses on audiovisual (A/V) technology in film, the arts, and businesses such as advertising. Students learn about job opportunities in a variety of settings and the training programs, degrees, and experience they may need to qualify for them.
  • Unit 2: Performing Arts: Unit 2 covers the performing arts, including careers both on and offstage.
  • Unit 3: Visual Arts: Unit 3 examines the exciting field of visual arts in depth, with discussions of artistic design principles, animation design, the work and training of multimedia artists, and developments in the burgeoning field of special effects and animation in studios worldwide.
  • Unit 4: Printing Technology, Journalism, and Broadcasting: Unit 4 enters the world of printing technology and print publishing, including digital media. Students study technological evolution and advancements in printing since the invention of paper. A timeline of (predominantly U.S.) journalism gives students a glimpse into magazine editing, digital printing technology, broadcast journalism, and the legal and ethical issues of news reporting today.
  • Unit 5: Telecommunications Systems: In Unit 5, students examine the telecommunications industry and learn more about careers in networking, phone technology, and communications and the training or certification needed for various specific positions.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Arts, A/V, Technology & Communications
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Careers in Government and Public Administration

Introduction to Careers in Government and Public Administration

This course will provide students with an overview of American politics and public administration, including how political institutions and public management systems at the local, state, and federal levels exercise supervisory authority and maintain accountability. Students will learn about the foundations of the U.S. government, the separation of powers, the federal civil service system, and the relationship between the government and state and local officials. They will also learn about governmental powers of the states and of local governments, such as education, law enforcement, and transportation. Students will learn about politics in the United States and the electoral process, political attitudes and opinions, and American political parties. They will also learn about the structure of U.S. federal governmental institutions, the nature of bureaucracy, and the functions of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government. Students will also learn about policy making in American government, including discussions of foreign and defense policies. After completing this course, students will have a fundamental understanding of U.S. government and public administration. They will be able to explain the history and structure of the government, how the government functions and relates to state and local governments, and how the government creates and enforces public policies.

  • Administrative and Political Systems in the United States: This unit focuses on the foundations of the U.S. government, the evolution of democratic political institutions, and the power of the government. After completing this unit, students will be able to explain the role of the Constitution in the formation of the U.S. government and describe the guiding principles of U.S. government including the separation of powers, federalism, and checks and balances. They will also be able to outline the basic structure and qualities of the modern U.S. civil service and identify the disadvantages of the system.
  • Overlapping Powers of Government: This unit focuses on the importance of the organization of power in the U.S. government and how certain functions are divided among agencies and state and federal levels. After completing this unit, students will be able to discuss the importance of states and local governments (cities, counties, and special districts) within our Constitutional system of federalism and division of powers. They will also be able to recognize the distribution of power among the branches and levels of government and contrast U.S. federalism with other forms of government. They will also be able to explain the difference between state-centered and national-centered federalism.
  • The Politics, Elections, and Democratic Participation: This unit focuses on the process of political change and democratic participation. After completing this unit, students will be able to describe the formation of public opinion, socialization, and electoral processes in political campaigns and elections, as well as explain how individuals can influence selection of public officials. They will be able to describe how elections are conducted by states and explain the role of lobbyists and mass media professionals in politics.
  • Governmental Institutions: Executive, Legislative, and Judicial: This unit focuses on the structure of U.S. governmental institutions. After completing this unit, students will be able to explain the Constitutional stipulations for being president and recognize the different roles of the president. They will also be able to discuss the evolving role for the vice president as an advisor and successor to the president and explain the functions of agencies of the executive branch of the federal government.
  • Public Policy and Program Implementation: This unit focuses on the foundations and process of government policy making. After completing this unit, students will be able to describe the policymaking process including defining the problem, policy formulation, implementation, and evaluation. They will also be able to evaluate how policies such as immigration and health policies impact Americans and to examine the problems domestic policies are designed to address and to define regulatory policy.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Government & Public Administration
Course Length: Semester

Teaching and Training Careers

Teaching and Training Careers

This course introduces students to the art and science of teaching. It provides a thorough exploration of pedagogy, curriculum, standards and practices, and the psychological factors shown by research to affect learners. In five units of study, lessons, and projects, students engage with the material through in-depth exploration and hands-on learning, to prepare them for teaching and training careers. Students are given many opportunities to be the teacher or trainer, and to explore the tasks, requirements, teaching strategies, and research-based methods that are effective and high-quality.

  • Unit 1: Foundations of Pedagogy: Unit 1 provides foundational information on the evolution of education, educational formats, learning theories and theorists, and the interconnectedness of knowledge areas in teaching and training careers.
  • Unit 2: Planning and Preparing a Lesson: In unit 2, students become teachers, creating courses and lesson plans to standards, in their exploration of instructional design and planning. They investigate resources and types of materials teachers select, use, and create.
  • Unit 3: Delivering and Assessing: Unit 3 focuses on classroom strategies, as students role-play in simulations to devise methods of handling classroom issues and engage individual learners. They assess student and teacher performance through assessments themselves, examining the effectiveness of various methods.
  • Unit 4: Managing the Learning Environment: Unit 4 focuses on the importance of a positive environment, as evidenced through research, and students identify elements that achieve this outcome. Students contrast inclusion-based education with previous instructional models from educational history.
  • Unit 5: Data and Use in School Relations: Unit 5 completes the 30 lesson segments with student investigation of data collection; rankings; student records; and how data is collected, compiled, used, and stored. Students research outreach methods and accountability regulations and practices, to see how data use affects community standing and relationships, policy reform, and school reputation.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Education & Training
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Careers in Education and Training

Introduction to Careers in Education and Training

Introduction to Careers in Education and Training will introduce students to the field of education and training, and the opportunities available for early-childhood care, primary school, secondary school, higher education, vocational training, and adult and continuing education. The students will gain an understanding of the career options available in teaching, administrative work, and support services. They will also explore the education and background experience needed to succeed in these careers.

Students will learn about the evolution of the modern educational system in the United States, and the policies and laws that govern educational institutions. They will also discover the similarities and differences between the ethical and legal obligations of working with adults versus working with children.

Students will learn about the skills needed to be effective communicators. They will also learn how to differentiate between different types of learning theories, and they will explore how to implement current principles from educational psychology into the classroom.

Students will also learn how to create a safe and healthy learning environment. They will discover the federal laws and agencies that set health-and-safety standards, and they will learn how these regulations are enforced in the workplace.The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the field of education and training, and to explain the career opportunities that are available in this field.

  • Unit 1: Education and Training: Historical Perspectives, Introduction, and Critical Skills: In this unit students learn about the historical evolution of the American educational system and the social, political, and economic role that education currently plays in modern society. They also learn about the critical importance of strong communication skills to a successful career in education and training.
  • Unit 2: Learning Styles and Collaborative Learning: In this unit students learn about the different theories that describe how people learn and the fundamentals of educational psychology. Students also investigate the ways in which group interactions can be used to enhance the learning process.
  • Unit 3: Educational Policy and Human-Resource Development: Unit 3 examines the careers available in the field of educational research, policy development, and human resources. Students also discover some of the skills critical to these careers including conflict resolution, leadership, and management skills.
  • Unit 4: Ethical and Legal Policies of Careers in Education and Training: Unit 4 examines the ethical and legal rights that govern behavior as it relates to training and education. Students also learn about the federal laws that are applicable to K–12 schools and higher educational institutions. They also explore career opportunities in the fields of social work and career counseling and those available in higher education.
  • Unit 5: Health and Safety in Education and Training: In Unit 5, students examine the health and safety practices that are applicable to the educational setting. They also discover the career opportunities that are available in the field of health and safety.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Education & Training
Course Length: Semester

Spanish III

Spanish III

Spanish III is a high school foreign language course that builds upon skills and concepts taught in Spanish II, emphasizing communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. Students will be able to speak and write accurately in Spanish, as well as become acquainted with the cultural differences of Hispanic countries while helping them gain a keen awareness of their own culture.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish, and in cultural competency.

During this course

  • Unit 1: Students will identify all of the Spanish speaking countries and their history, explore Hispanic food, music, and festivals. They will also practice conjugating verbs and using different forms of tenses.
  • Unit 2: Students will explore different characteristics of Spanish speaking cultures, adjectives and pronouns, and reflexive verbs and pronouns that are associated with multiple aspects of Spanish life.
  • Unit 3: Students will identify Spanish language sources of news and examine the role of sports, television, politics, upper class, celebrities, and climate. They will also conjugate verbs and practice preterit and imperfect tenses.
  • Unit 4: Students will examine different methods of communication and technology in Spanish speaking countries. They will also learn pronouns, different forms of tenses, and adjectives associated with communication and technology.
  • Unit 5: Students will learn about cities and characteristics of life in Spanish-speaking cities. They will continue to practice different parts of speech in Spanish.
  • Unit 7: Students will study travel and tourism in Spanish-speaking countries and use present subjunctives with multiple topics.
  • Unit 8: Students will learn different aspects of medicine including exercise, nutrition, and alternative medicine in Spanish-speaking countries. They will practice present subjunctives and conjunctions.
  • Unit 9: Students will explore the causes and effects of pollution, environmental issues, hunting, conservation, and oil production in Spanish-speaking countries. They will practice present-perfect subjunctives, adjective clauses, and vocabulary.
  • Unit 10: Students will learn about archaeology, history, and the beliefs of Spanish-speaking countries while using subjunctive verbs and preterit tense forms.
  • Unit 11: Students will concentrate on the history of government, elections and voting, the economy, and immigration in Spanish-speaking countries. They will also demonstrate different forms of subjunctives.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: World Languages
Course Length: Year

Spanish II

Spanish II

Spanish II is a high school foreign language course that builds upon skills and concepts taught in Spanish I, emphasizing communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. This course gives students practice using the mechanics of the Spanish language, acquaints them with the cultural differences of Hispanic countries, and helps them gain a keen awareness of their own culture.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish, and in cultural competency. In addition to the default course program, Spanish II includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

During this course

  • Unit 1: Students will identify all of the Spanish speaking countries, translate key words related to those countries, learn food and travel related vocabulary words, and study different parts of speech.
  • Unit 2: Students will concentrate on all aspects of Chile and memorize Spanish speaking countries and capitals. They will also examine verbs, adjectives, vocabulary, and punctuation dealing with school systems and classrooms.
  • Unit 3: Students will explore the geography, culture, and history of Venezuela. They will also focus on the following parts of speech: prepositions, intonation and accents, rules of superlatives, pronouns, and vocabulary words.
  • Unit 4: Students will study the geography, history, and culture of Peru as well as the causes and symptoms of culture shock. They will learn different verbs, pronouns, idioms, and vocabulary words.
  • Unit 5: Students will focus on all aspects of Colombia, careers, and jobs. They will practice conjugating verbs, studying the different meanings of sentences, and vocabulary words.
  • Unit 7: Students will examine multiple aspects of Guatemala. They will also learn about conjugating verbs along with travel and transportation vocabulary.
  • Unit 8: Students will concentrate on the history and culture of Bolivia and Ecuador. They will also practice place vocabulary, verbs, and conjugating verbs.
  • Unit 9: Students will explore the history, geography, and customs of Costa Rica. They will demonstrate understanding of preterit and imperfect tenses and vocabulary regarding news and media.
  • Unit 10: Students will examine the history and culture of Peru and Uruguay. They will also learn different forms of verbs, creating formal and informal commands, and using object pronouns.
  • Unit 11: Students will focus on characteristics of life and history in Nicaragua, traveling in Latin America, the vocabulary and commands relating to health and medical topics, verb tenses, and prepositions.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: World Languages
Course Length: Year

Spanish I

Spanish I

Ppanish I is an entry level high school foreign language course that explores the Spanish language through communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities. Spanish I introduces students to the mechanics of the Spanish language, acquaints them with the cultural differences of Hispanic countries, and helps them gain a keen awareness of their own culture.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish, and in cultural competency. In addition to the default course program, Spanish I includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

During this course

  • Unit 1: Students will practice language patterns when they use words and phrases in Spanish. They will also review vocabulary words and parts of grammar.
  • Unit 2: Students will study parts of grammar, and practice pronunciation. They will also learn how to tell time, say numbers, and say dates in Spanish.
  • Unit 3: Students will learn more grammar including how to conjugate verbs, history and cultural traditions of Mexico, and vocabulary words associated with the beach.
  • Unit 4: Students will discover Argentina through its geography, culture, and activities. They will also learn verbs and adjectives associated with Argentina, and how to form questions.
  • Unit 5: Students will explore the geography and culture of Honduras while continuing to learn parts of speech and basic weather terms in Spanish.
  • Unit 7: Students will learn about all aspects of Puerto Rico while also learning how to respond to questions, different parts of speech, and vocabulary words.
  • Unit 8: Students will examine the history and culture of Spain while learning different parts of speech that relates to aspects of this country.
  • Unit 9: Students will study the history and culture of Cuba. They will also learn how say and use different parts of the body and clothes.
  • Unit 10: Students will explore aspects of the Dominican Republic while continuing to learn parts of speech. They will also study vocabulary associated with shopping.
  • Unit 11: Students will examine the history, culture, and activities of Panama. They will also learn phrases and vocabulary associated with transportation while still focusing on parts of speech.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: World Languages
Course Length: Year

French II

French II

French II is a high school foreign language course that builds on and reviews skills and concepts taught in French I through further exposure to communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency. In addition to the default course program, French II includes extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

This course gives students practice using the mechanics of the French language, acquaints them with the cultural differences of francophone countries, and helps them gain a keen awareness of their own culture.

  • Unit 1: Students will explore how to shop in France through vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation of products, markets, and bakeries.
  • Unit 2: Students will examine different professions and trades through vocab, grammar, and pronunciation.
  • Unit 3: Students will learn cultural information, vocabulary, and grammar relating to French films.
  • Unit 4: Students will learn vocabulary and grammar related to living in the city, the countryside, and traveling by train. They will also learn how to conjugate a list of past tense verbs.
  • Unit 5: Students will examine all topics of health and illness by using vocab, grammar, and pronunciation.
  • Unit 7: Students will study the vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation relating to travel and visiting Quebec.
  • Unit 8: Students will study all about the influences that have affected clothing through the last 100 years while using grammar and pronunciation.
  • Unit 9: Students will learn about art-related vocabulary, historical and cultural connections to art, France's influence on the art of other cultures, as well as some new grammatical elements.
  • Unit 10: Students will explore an overview of three francophone regions: Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, Guadeloupe, in the Caribbean Sea, and French Polynesia, in the South Pacific. They will learn pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary associated with these regions and travel.
  • Unit 11: Students will discover life events that francophone cultures consider significant. They will then review these events and the grammatical structures that enable people to talk about them.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: World Languages
Course Length: Year

French I

French I

In French 1, students begin to develop competence in four basic skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Whiledeveloping communicative competence in French, students gain and expand their knowledge of francophone countries and cultures. In addition to the default course program, French I include extra alternate lessons, projects, and tests for use in enhancing instruction or addressing individual needs.

Emphasis is placed on learning the present tense, the near future and the past tense in French I through thematically designed units. Topics include home, school, family, holidays, and daily and leisure activities.

  • Unit 1: Students will be introduced to French by learning greetings, the alphabet, numbers, how French has been influenced by other cultures, and how nouns are affected by gender.
  • Unit 2: Students will learn school-related vocabulary words and classroom expressions, the days of the week, months, and time. They will also learn how to conjugate certain verbs.
  • Unit 3: Students will study the French names for family members and possessive adjectives. They will then learn how to describe someone’s hair and eye color and ask questions for information in French.
  • Unit 4: Students will explore the sports and activities of France, the verbs and adverbs of those activities as well as the temperature and seasons in French.
  • Unit 5: Students will learn about colors and expressions, holidays celebrated, stem-changing verbs, and direct-object nouns and pronouns.
  • Unit 7: Students will identify modes of transportation and buildings, use prepositions of place, and conjugate regular and irregular “-re verbs”.
  • Unit 8: Students will learn words that pertain to food and beverages, analyze French cuisine and regional dishes, and use partitive articles and expressions of quantity.
  • Unit 9: Students will identify words pertaining to clothes and parts of the body, gestures and expressions. They will also conjugate reflexive verbs and explain routines in France.
  • Unit 10: Students will examine words pertaining to computers, the Internet, and television. They will also identify direct and indirect objects and replace them with direct and indirect pronouns.
  • Unit 11: Students will learn vocabulary words related to travel, the beach, and trains. They will also examine grammar and words relating to French customs about vacations.

Students develop the ability to:

  • greet and respond to greetings
  • introduce and respond to introductions
  • engage in conversations on several themes
  • express likes and dislikes
  • make requests
  • obtain information
  • understand some ideas and familiar details
  • begin to provide information

By the end of French I, students will:

  • communicate minimally by using short sentences, learned words and phrases, and simple questions and commands when speaking and writing.
  • understand some ideas and familiar details presented in clear, uncomplicated speech when listening.
  • understand short texts enhanced by visual clues when reading. 

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: World Languages
Course Length: Year

Vietnam Era

Vietnam Era

What comes to mind when you think about the Vietnam Era? For many, that period represents a difficult time in U.S. history. It is defined by an unpopular war that claimed the lives of 58,000 Americans and some 3 million Vietnamese. In this course, you'll look at the history of the Vietnam War. The roots of the conflict stretch further back than you might know. You'll examine why the United States got involved in the conflict and why the United States failed to achieve its objectives.

  • Unit 1: Students will learn about the history of Vietnam before the war and explain why the United States got involved in Vietnam.
  • Unit 2: Students will study the growth of U.S. involvement in Vietnam following the 1954 Geneva Accords to the first American combat troops in 1965 after the Gulf of Tonkin incident.
  • Unit 3: Students will describe fighting techniques and efforts by both the Vietnamese and Americans as well as the U.S. public opinion about the war.
  • Unit 4: Students will explore the Tet Offensive, Vietnamization, and the end of the war.
  • Unit 5: Students will identify the outcome of the Vietnam War, examine the 1973 Paris Peace Accords, and explain the impact of the Vietnam War on American foreign policy.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: History & Social Sciences
Course Length: Semester