At Odysseyware, we are committed to designing and publishing standards-aligned courses to support student learning. Our curriculum development team designs courses beginning with state and national standards.

Subject Matter Experts unpack each standard to craft standards-aligned learning objectives prior to collaborating with instructional designers, curriculum writers and editors to design courses, units, lessons, projects and assessments.

Courses in Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science, and History/Social Sciences are aligned to Arkansas' Academic Standards and Curriculum Framework.

Small Business Entrepreneurship

Small Business Entrepreneurship

This semester-long course is designed to provide the skills needed to effectively organize, develop, create, and manage your own business, while exposing you to the challenges, problems, and issues faced by entrepreneurs. Throughout this course, you will be given the chance to see what kinds of opportunities exist for small business entrepreneurs and become aware of the necessary skills for running a business. You will become familiar with the traits and characteristics that are found in successful entrepreneurs, and you will see how research, planning, operations, and regulations can affect small businesses. You will learn how to develop plans for having effective business management and marketing strategies.

Small Business Entrepreneurship will teach you basic principles of entrepreneurship and business ethics. You'll look at the major steps relevant to starting a new business. These steps include financing, marketing, and managing. Knowing how to analyze a business plan will help you develop one, while at the same time making it easier for you to understand the reasons businesses have to write one. Small Business Entrepreneurship is designed to give you an overview on running a business from start to finish.

Objectives

  • Understand the basic aspects of entrepreneurship.
  • Recognize the legal environment of a small business.
  • Describe basic economic principles.
  • Understand scarcity and forecasting.
  • Identify different kinds of costs.
  • Explain the principles of financing.
  • Identify kinds of financial records.
  • Know the sources of financing.
  • Explain target markets.
  • Analyze market research and competition.
  • Describe marketing mix.
  • Recognize the roles of management.
  • Construct a business plan.

Students must be computer literate and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Word processing and presentation software may be required to produce projects.

State: National, California, Florida, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Washington
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Principles of Business and Finance

Principles of Business and Finance

This course will introduce students to the fundamental structure of the American economy, the complexities of the global economy, and the principles, practices, and strategies associated with starting, managing, or simply working for a business.

Through a combination of lessons and projects, students will trace a trajectory of their potential role in the American economy as consumers, laborers, and executives. With lessons on everything from marketing to writing formal business correspondence, from the basic structures and legal definitions of business to the operations and importance of financial institutions, students will emerge from this course with a thorough introductory understanding of the business world.

Students will perform research, conduct interviews, and write papers on various topics designed to enrich their understandingof the American business environment. They will also navigate an interactive and creative project that spans the length of the course and asks students to engage their learning, imaginations and individual career motivation with the course material.

  • Unit 1: The Business Organization: Unit I takes students to the front door of business, discussing the various structures these commercial enterprises might take, from a sole proprietorship with just one employee to immense multinational corporations. Students examine how, regardless of size, every business has an ethical responsibility to its customers, clients, and employees to provide them products and services that meet the highest standards for quality and integrity, and how a failure to meet these ethical responsibilities likely will result in a dramatic loss of customers and revenue. Students also investigate the roles and responsibilities of those starting, leading, and managing businesses. Students learn about the differences between leaders and managers, about the important role human resource specialists play in recruiting and retaining the best employees available, and how a growing number of professionals today are starting their own businesses and becoming global entrepreneurs. 
  • Unit 2: Technology: Gateway to International Business Opportunities: Students begin this unit discussing the benefits technology has brought to business, ranging from software that manages several “back office” functions such as inventory control, payroll, budgeting, taxes, and communication and then examine how this technology also opens up new markets down the street and across the globe. Today, small business owners in Baltimore can do business with customers in Bahrain, Bangkok, and Brasilia as easily as they can with the family living in the apartment down the street. To be successful, however, that business owner must first understand the cultural and social differences from one country to another and apply the proper business etiquette; how to do this effectively using technology or in face to face meetings is a further topic of investigation in this unit.
  • Unit 3: Economics and Business: Business success depends on a healthy economy, and this unit delves into the nature of the U.S. free-market economy that relies on consumers to influence critical decisions about what to produce and at what price to sell a variety of goods and services. As part of this exploration, we delve into supply and demand, the difference between goods and services, government controls over the economy, needs and wants, and the role of private enterprise in meeting the basic needs of a population. Further, we relate these macroeconomic concepts to the responsibility business leaders have to carefully manage their capital and assets so that they provide the greatest benefit to the greatest number while maintaining a profitable and successful enterprise.
  • Unit 4: Marketing, Markets, Sales and Consumers: Connecting businesses and consumers is in many respects the business of business. This unit begins with an introduction to marketing and advertising, with opportunities for learners to understand the differences between the two and the very distinct roles marketers and advertisers play in bringing products and services to market. We then take a closer look at the traditions of advertising, what changes have been introduced since the Colonial era when merchants would post lists of inventories outside their shops, and how the Internet has opened additional opportunities for businesses to advertise their products and services. We have a frank discussion about the role of the consumer and how the government will step in to protect consumers from products that can cause physical harm as well as services that defraud consumers. The unit concludes with opportunities for students to explore sales techniques and careers and to gain insight into how group dynamics may influence decision making. 
  • Unit 5: The Language of Business and Expressing your Career Interests: This final unit of Principles of Business and Finance provides students an opportunity to develop the basic skills they will need to succeed in a business environment, beginning with a discussion of appropriate and inappropriate forms of communication in the business setting. Students are encouraged to try their hand at formatting formal business letters, memoranda, and e-mail messages using the suggestions and guidelines presented in this lesson. They have opportunities to become familiar with PowerPoint and other presentation software and to look at the changes these products have made to the business. The unit concludes with encouragement to the student to quite literally, “Get out there!” and use the skills and insight they have garnered in their efforts to land a great job in the business community.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Office 2013 Applications II

Office 2013 Applications II

Office 2013 Applications II is a semester-length, high school elective course that explores the use of application skills in the 2013 versions of Microsoft® Excel® and Microsoft® Access®. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business spreadsheet and database documents. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

  1. Introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft® Excel® ranging from basic spreadsheet terminology to exploring data entry, formatting, formulas, functions, charts, graphics, and additional features available in backstage view
  2. Skills in Microsoft® Access®, ranging from basic relational database terminology to creating and modifying tables, forms, queries, and reports

Objectives

  • Recognize the elements of an Excel spreadsheet.
  • Demonstrate use of Excel navigation and protection tools.
  • Know how to modify, edit, save, create, and format Excel spreadsheets.
  • Use tools to manage Excel worksheets.
  • Define the rules for creating formulas and functions in Excel worksheets.
  • Demonstrate how to create, modify, and edit charts and shapes in Microsoft Excel.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of database design.
  • Manage the Access Environment.
  • Create an Access database.
  • Create, modify, and edit Access forms, queries, and reports.

MICROSOFT,MICROSOFT WORD,MICROSOFT POWERPOINT,MICROSOFT EXCEL,MICROSOFT ACCESS, AND MICROSOFT PUBLISHER ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Office 2013 Applications I

Office 2013 Applications I

Office 2013 Applications I is a semester-length, high school elective that explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Word®, Publisher®, and PowerPoint® 2013. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business documents, publications, and presentations. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following Microsoft Office® applications:

  1. Microsoft Word: Students are provided with an introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft Word that range from simply developing an understanding of the various uses of Word to more complex explorations of mail merge, tab stops, reference resources, and additional features available in backstage view
  2. Microsoft Publisher: Students learn to create publications, insert and edit publication items, and view, review, and share those publications.
  3. Microsoft PowerPoint: Students will learn how to create presentations, enter and modify content, modify and deliver presentations, and collaborate and share PowerPoint presentations.

Objectives

  • Create, modify, save, and format styles, text, font, pages, and folders in Microsoft Word.
  • Demonstrate use of the Cut, Copy, and Paste commands and the Show/Hide button while editing documents.
  • Show how to use Spell Check, Find and Replace, and AutoCorrect in the Word application.
  • Know how to track changes and add comments in a document.
  • Demonstrate how to insert, format, modify, and edit elements of a Word document.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Microsoft Word advanced skills.
  • Understand the basics of references in Word.Modify document properties including templates.
  • Recognize how to navigate, modify, edit, and review elements of the Microsoft Publisher application.
  • Recall how to print and share a publication electronically.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how to open, modify, insert, create, present, and save elements of a PowerPoint presentation.

MICROSOFT,MICROSOFT WORD,MICROSOFT POWERPOINT,MICROSOFT EXCEL,MICROSOFT ACCESS, AND MICROSOFT PUBLISHER ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Office 2010 Applications II

Office 2010 Applications II

Office Applications II is a semester-length, high school elective course that explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Excel® and Microsoft® Access®. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business spreadsheet and database documents. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

Introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft® Excel® ranging from basic spreadsheet terminology to exploring data entry, formatting, formulas, functions, charts, graphics, and additional features available in backstage vieww
Skills in Microsoft® Access®, ranging from basic relational database terminology to creating and modifying tables, forms, queries, and reports.

Objectives

  • Recognize the elements of an Excel spreadsheet.
  • Demonstrate use of Excel navigation and protection tools.
  • Know how to modify, edit, save, create, and format Excel spreadsheets.
  • Use tools to manage Excel worksheets.
  • Define the rules for creating formulas and functions in Excel worksheets.
  • Demonstrate how to create, modify, and edit charts and shapes in Microsoft Excel.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of database design.
  • Manage the Access Environment.
  • Create an Access database.
  • Create, modify, and edit Access forms, queries, and reports.

Students must be computer literate and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Word processing and presentation software might be required to produce projects.

MICROSOFT,MICROSOFT WORD,MICROSOFT POWERPOINT,MICROSOFT EXCEL,MICROSOFT ACCESS, AND MICROSOFT PUBLISHER ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Office 2010 Applications I

Office 2010 Applications I

Office 2010 Applications I is a semester-length, high school elective that explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Word®, Publisher®, and PowerPoint® 2010. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business documents, publications, and presentations. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following Microsoft Office® applications:

Microsoft Word: Students are provided with an introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft Word that range from simply developing an understanding of the various uses of Word to more complex explorations of mail merge, tab stops, reference resources, and additional features available in backstage view.

  • Microsoft Publisher: Students learn to create publications, insert and edit publication items, and view, review, and share those publications.
  • Microsoft PowerPoint: Students will learn how to create presentations, enter and modify content, modify and deliver presentations, and collaborate and share PowerPoint presentations.
  • Microsoft Word Beginning Skills: Students will learn beginning skills in Word software, including how to create brochures, newsletters and other documents needed in a business environment.
  • Microsoft Word Intermediate Skills: Students continue deepening their Word skills by learning about the finer points of the application, including inserting images, text boxes, shapes and tables into documents, and exploring tools they will use as they review and revise documents.
  • Microsoft Word Advanced Skills: In this unit, students will focus on combining data from multiple sources to create labels and letters. They will also learn about adding special report features to documents such as endnotes, footnotes and hyperlinks.
  • Microsoft Publisher Application: Students will explore the Publisher application, a desktop-publishing application that will allow them to create publications such as newsletters, business cards, brochures, or programs.
  • Microsoft Powerpoint Application: Students will focus on the PowerPoint application and its power to design and deliver presentations. By using this application, they will learn to design, develop, and create presentations that can be delivered in many ways.

MICROSOFT,MICROSOFT WORD,MICROSOFT POWERPOINT,MICROSOFT EXCEL,MICROSOFT ACCESS, AND MICROSOFT PUBLISHER ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND/OR OTHER COUNTRIES.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Career Management

Career Management

Career management is a semester-length high school elective course that assists students in their preparation for career selection. The course is designed to improve workforce skills needed in all careers including:

  • communication
  • leadership
  • teamwork
  • decision making
  • problem solving
  • goal setting
  • time management

Students will complete activities that help identify personal interests, aptitudes, and learning styles. Students will use results of self-assessments to determine careers that may prove personally satisfying.

  • Unit 1: What is Work? Unit I looks at the elements of employment, from the purpose and personal benefits of work to lifelong learning and technology. Students learn about wages and employment benefits, find out how to maintain a time sheet, set lifestyle goals that match their work goals, and attain problem-solving skills. Students will also explore career clusters and begin a project that helps them which career clusters best match their talents and life goals.
  • Unit 2: Self-Assessment: Students begin this unit discussing their interests, skills and aptitudes. Students also explore their personality traits and values, and their learning styles. In lessons on listening, speaking and writing, students learn about communication skills and how to use them to improve relationships and performance. Teamwork and collaboration round out the unit, and students learn the importance of positive teamwork skills and the opportunities they will find throughout life to use them.
  • Unit 3: Career Research: This unit begins with an emphasis on the skills and tools students should possess for success as a member of the workforce. It continues with an overview of career education, training and qualifications, as well a look at the level of wages and benefits students can expect for different careers. Students will also learn about resources for exploring careers and how to compare careers based on research they conduct.
  • Unit 4: Planning for Your Career: What is appropriate workplace behavior and style, and how does it affect a career? Those are some of the topics students will explore in this unit, which will help them identify some of the benefits wise choices in those areas can have. Students will also learn about workplace trends, such as telecommuting and flextime, and behaviors that they can develop that will make them highly employable. Decision-making steps, goal-setting, mentoring and conflict management will also be studied, as will the importance of extracurricular and community activities.
  • Unit 5: Preparing for Your Career: Some of the nuts and bolts of acquiring a job are the focus of this unit, as students explore resumes, cover letters, job applications and finding job leads. Skills to help students through the job-seeking process are also taught through lessons on researching potential employers as well as on interview behaviors and follow-up.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Business Law

Business Law

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of some of the vital legal concepts that affect commerce and trade, after first gaining some familiarity with how laws are created and interpreted. Students will then be introduced to the types of businesses that can be created to engage in commerce as well as the contractual and liability considerations that can impact a business. Laws that affect how a business is regulated will also be reviewed, particularly the impact of administrative rules and regulations on a business. Global commerce and international agreements, treaties, organizations, and courts that can affect business will be discussed to get a better sense of what it means to "go global" with a business.

Consumer and environmental protections will be explained as well as bankruptcy options, should a business go insolvent. Lastly, no business exists without experiencing some kind of dispute or another, and so we will review the options that exist for dispute resolution and alternative dispute resolution to provide a better understanding of how best to deal with such matters.

  • Unit 1: The Role of Law and Its Impact on Business: Chapter 1 focuses on the legislative and executive branches of government and discussed the functions of each branch. In the second chapter, students begin a discussion on corporations by reviewing sole proprietorships and agency relationships.
  • Unit 2: Legal Considerations in Business Law: In this unit, students are introduced to the three elements that must be present for a contract to be valid: offer, acceptance and consideration. Students will also examine the Uniform Commercial Code, a federal law that regulates contracts for the sale of goods, including Internet contracts. Students also learn about the three types of contract defenses – validity of formation, inability to perform the contract, and inability to enforce a contract. Torts (civil wrongs causing injury to others) and defenses are also examined, as are liability and nuisance.
  • Unit 3: Regulating a Business: Unit 3 examines ethics and the law, including a discussion about how we determine what is right and what is wrong. Crimes against property are also probed, including white-collar crime. Criminal and civil procedure are also reviewed, including the key stages of each. An examination of administrative law and its history, the commerce clause, and employment law comprise the second half of this unit.
  • Unit 4: Global Commerce: Unit 4 introduces the concept of intellectual property and its protections, including trademarks, patents and copyrights. E-commerce is also discussed, as is international law and free trade and the free flow of capital in an increasingly integrated global economy.
  • Unit 5: Protections and Resolutions: In Unit 5, students examine consumer protection, environmental protection. Bankruptcy law and dispute resolution are also probed.

Course Requirements
While there are no formal requirements for this course, it is important to understand that this is a challenging course requiring your best critical-thinking skills. The ability to conduct research, make lateral connections, and consider options not clearly outlined is a function of those who successfully practice the law. This course uses scenarios and case studies to apply the concepts offered and encourages creative (but legal and ethical) thinking. For the student who is considering a career in thelaw, this course is a good primer.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Business Management & Administration
Course Length: Semester

Introduction to Careers in Finance

Introduction to Careers in Finance

Introduction to Careers in Finance course provides the fundamentals of the financial services industry in the United States and explores the jobs and career opportunities that the industry offers.

  • Unit 1: Finance Overview and Financial Services: Unit 1 introduces the financial services industry and the financial systems that operate in the US and internationally.
  • Unit 2: Securities Analysis and Investments: Unit 2 examines securities markets and investment companies, looks at how companies evaluate and mitigate risk, and discusses the valuation of stocks and bonds.
  • Unit 3: Principles of Corporate Finance: Unit 3 discusses the roles and responsibilities of corporate finance and accounting, analysis of financial statements, capital budgeting, and capital structure.
  • Unit 4: Banking Services: Unit 4 focuses on banking services, including how the industry is organized and regulated and how risks are managed.
  • Unit 5: Risk Management and Insurance: Unit 5 looks at the insurance industry, including how it is organized and regulated, how it addresses risks, and the career opportunities it offers.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Finance
Course Length: Semester

Banking Services Careers

Banking Services Careers

The exchange of money in the United States is generally managed with the services of banks and other financial institutions, whose reputations depend greatly on customer satisfaction and trust. Many of the products we use daily, like checking and savings accounts, debit cards, credit cards, and loans, are the backbone of the banking industry. This course will provide an overview of how the banking system works, what the Federal Reserve is, and the technical and social skills needed to work in banking and related services. Students will explore career paths and the required training or higher education necessary andwill gain an understanding of the basic functions of customer transactions (i.e., setting up an account, processing a loan, or establishing a business), cash drawer activity, check collection processes, and other customer service–related transactions. This course will also discuss how technology has changed banking in the 21st century. The banking industry is responsible for many of the products that we use on a daily basis, from checking and savings accounts to debit cards, credit cards, and loans.

This course will focus on the specific skills related to banking and related services. In addition, you will explore career paths and the required training or higher education preparation necessary to obtain a career in banking and related services. Also, you will gain an understanding of the basic functions of customer transactions, cash drawer activity, check collection processes, and other customer service–related transactions. This course will also discuss how technology has changed the banking and related services industry. Finally, this course will provide an overview of the technical and people skills necessary to aid consumers with setting up an account, processing a loan, or establishing a business.

  • UNIT 1: Description of the Banking Industry: Unit 1 familiarizes students with an overview of the entire banking industry, starting with the history of money in the United States. The discussion begins with The Federal Reserve System. The Federal Reserve System is the central bank of the United States and is responsible for a variety of tasks and oversight for the banking industry. In addition, Unit 1 focusses on the different types of financial institutions and will compare and contrast the competition in the banking industry. State-  and federally chartered banks and savings banks and credit unions will be discussed.
  • UNIT 2: Bank Performance: Unit 2 introduces students to bank performance and the financial information that is disseminated to the stakeholders of the organization. In addition, the laws and regulations that oversee the required release of financial information are also discussed. Bank performance can relate to the profitability of the bank and also the customer reviews of the banks. Students will learn the areas that banks are rated and how they are compared to their competitors. Of course, both performance ratings will impact the bottom line, as customer service is directly linked to banks’ profitability.
  • UNIT 3: Bank Products: Unit 3 introduces different products that are offered by banks. These products include deposit account products and also different lending options. Because banks offer almost the same products, it is important to understand what the products are and how each can be used to enhance one’s personal finances. In addition, this unit will discuss e-banking and how the Internet and technology have transformed the banking industry.
  • UNIT 4: Building Customer Relationships: Unit 4 demonstrates how banks develop customer relationships. Gaining new customers and retaining their current customers are both essential to the success of banks. Through personal financial planning, bankers are able to help customers reach their financial goals and gain loyal customers along the way. In addition, by being involved in the communities they serve, banks create an image of caring about the people and community that they serve. Both are important areas for building relationships and gaining long-term customers.
  • UNIT 5: Banking and Consumers: Unit 5 introduces the different roles of bank employees and explains the basic products and services that banks offer. Employees provide an important link to the customers they serve and must have a working knowledge of bank procedures, an understanding of products and services, and the skills to provide this information to the consumers. Understanding the products and services that are offered is essential for all employees. The employees have an important role in educating the customers about what services and products are available and which ones would benefit them the most in their financial goals and daily lives.

State: National
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
Category: Finance
Course Length: Semester